ATI licenses Intrinsity for faster chips

JoeB

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Aug 8, 2003
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<A HREF="http://www.extremetech.com/article2/0,3973,1518144,00.asp" target="_new">http://www.extremetech.com/article2/0,3973,1518144,00.asp</A>

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speeduk

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Feb 20, 2003
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Nice. A gpu running as fast as my athlon 64.

<A HREF="http://service.futuremark.com/compare?2k1=7523662" target="_new"> MY A64 System </A>
 

Crashman

Polypheme
Former Staff
If successfull, ATI will use this technology to reduce cost, not to increase performance. Imagine if the next performance card they released was a 1GHz Radeon 9600. And the next one after that was a 1.4GHz Radeon 9600. And the next one after that a 2GHz Radeon 9600. 2 years with virtually no developement cost.

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coolsquirtle

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Jan 4, 2003
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ARE U SERIOUS?!??!

well... no point of releasing fastass card if the game developer are soooo fing SLOW!!

i mean nothing right now can even touch 9800pro, sure HL2 and doom3? WHERE ARE THEY? STUPID VALVE!

RIP Block Heater....HELLO P4~~~~~
120% nVidia Fanboy
never tried to go crazy when it comes to o/cing.
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Crashman

Polypheme
Former Staff
No, I'm not completely serious. Here's what will probably happen:

1.) ATI already had a lot of developement work done on their next 2 top cores. They will probably release the next one on time. And if this new technology helps them, they will probably release the one after that late. Very late. As in, the R420 or whatever will see it's life extended substantially as a result of increased speed.

2.) ATI will release a long delayed replacement for the R420, but by then nVidia will probably be using similar tricks to speed up their hardware. And the replacement for the R420 will probably be too late to catch ATI back up.


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Two problems with your scenario.

First the core after the R420/423 is the 450 which is supposed to be the 0.11 core which if effective will be cheaper to make (in theory).

Second, with an ace in your pocket, you don't use it to simply extend the life of the core, you do it to either trounce the competition again with a leapfrog (the R450 being as fast as the R480 or R500 was epected to be), or you use this to help R450 if it has problems. Extending the R420 with new technology is as much effort as releasing the next core.

I would think in all likelyhood it will be used on the R500 series because this next round is pretty much set in their competitive choices. Only with a serious failure would you likely see such a new process adopted within the year, IMO.

We might also see it used to help their workstation cards ovetake their competition.

It would also make sense to come up with a solution that uses less transistors but higher clock rate to match a more expensive higher transistor count (the 1000mhz R9600 is a good example). That would lower costs while delivering similar performance.

Of course we may also never see it, and it may be used to help the aliens get better interactive anime porn. What do I know? :evil:


- You need a licence to buy a gun, but they'll sell anyone a stamp <i>(or internet account)</i> ! - <font color=green>RED </font color=green> <font color=red> GREEN</font color=red> GA to SK :evil:
 

Crashman

Polypheme
Former Staff
The flaw in your logic is that you don't seem to follow ATI's history:

1.) Instead of the Radeon 9800XT, we were supposed to get the R400. ATI decided to skip the R400 because they didn't need it to remain competative with nVidia.

2.) The R300 was supposed to be .13 micron, but the process wasn't at full capacity in time so ATI went .15 micron. The R350 was supposed to fix that, but didn't because ATI deamed the extra clock speed available on .13 micron cores wouldn't be needed to remain competitave with nVidia.

So basically ATI doesn't play trump cards.

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I know their history and don't lok on it as coldly as some, I see it from an economic standpoint which is really the only way for ATI to look at it. Do thngs that will keep people buying ATI products at a price that can ake them money. Do things that lower the cost so that the prices can be lower and they can still make money, or the prices can be the same and they make more money. Compettiion is part of it, and the lack of nV's threat did change the situation LAST time, can't be sure about next time.

Well actually they skipped it because it wasn't competitive with the NV40. Whether it would've made sense to release it instead of the R9800XT, that's another story. But whether or not they scuttle the R450 for an R460/470 before the R480, or skip to the R500 doesn't matter so much, they are still drawing board items, and like the R400, perhaps with developments that will change. I doubt he R400 was meant to be low-K, but now the R420 IS, thus allowing ATI to crank more juice out of their design.

It's a good thing that ATI didn't rush the 0.13 process. They did a good job with the RV350, but there is no guarantee that it would've worked for the R300 series. The RV350 had less transistors, and also came after TSMC had rolled the dice with the NV30. As for the R350, well if there is no competition, why risk destroying the line with something that is that expensive and risky. They were able to once again come out ahead with the R350. Did they go far beyond the R300 or NV35? No of course not, but that's not what I'm implying either. You're missing the referesj versus the whole new design. This time around is different, ATI has the upper hand, so they can be a little riskier, but not much, and I doubt even then that they would. If you follow the history something like a 1-1.2ghz RV350/380 would be the cheap and easy route with little risk. The reason for changing to 0.11 would be more about fiting more chips on a waffer, but if they encounter as bad a yield as nV did with their 0.13 early experiences, then there is no point since you're throwing out more chips and therefore losing the benefit.

I never said this will translate to sole benifit to us, but it might. As much as you talk about their post R300 history, rememebr that the introduction of the R300 also changed the landscape, who's to say that ATI wouldn't do that again. If they are equal or if the differences in design show the R42X to be lacking in some respect where the NV40 shines then of course ATI will use it to catch up which would require them to leapfrog to regain faith/purchases. But, it may simply give them the flexibility they need when it comes time to make 32bit precision work, and move to a new process (fab or design). The main thing is it's better to have it than not, and it will translate into some benifit to us, despite the fact that that is not the main intent for ATI.


- You need a licence to buy a gun, but they'll sell anyone a stamp <i>(or internet account)</i> ! - <font color=green>RED </font color=green> <font color=red> GREEN</font color=red> GA to SK :evil:
 

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