Question ATX 2-pin motherboard connector

guswah

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I recently got a mini-ITX motherboard for a living room build, namely the ASUS Q87T. The first thing I noted was that the ATX power connector on the board is only a 2-pin. But the power supply I'm using has a much larger ATX plug. It also has a few 2-pin power connectors, but their pin configurations don't match the one I need for the mobo. But...

There is also a four-pin power connector, and half of it IS correct for the mobo. By that I mean that if I were to rotate the plug in just the right way amd use only two of the four pins, then yes, the pin configuration would be correct (one rounded and one square) and allow the remaining two pins to straddle the socket's lip and do nothing.

Is this acceptable? Or do I risk blowing up my motherboard?
 
A Thin Mini-ITX Form Factor motherboard differs from Mini-ITX. You didn't get the latter.

The Q87T motherboard is for an All-in-One system. All-in-One PC cases were introduced about five years ago, but the concept for building them never caught on.

Here are an example of some discontinued models:
https://www.quietpc.com/mono-aio

OEM PC makers are still selling AIO pre-built models but bare cases for them seem to be discontinued due to lack of interest. Thin-Mini ITX motherboards were designed so people could replace a motherboard in an All-In-One PC.
https://www.newegg.com/acer-z24-880-ur13-aspire-all-in-one-pc/p/N82E16883101606?Item=N82E16883101606&Tpk=N82E16883101606
 
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guswah

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that 2pin power plug has 19V DC imput
u can use either external 19V DC plug (on I/O ports) or internal DC converter plug

your ATX power supply is not compatible with this mainboard (that 4pin is 12V)
This is all news to me. Until now I'd never heard of 19v. Indeed there is a connector on the I/O panel for "DC power connector", but not a stitch of information in the manual about a specific power device that should be used or what would be the correct amperage. Very weird.

The "internal DC converter plug" you mention -- is that merely a plug that creates two leads out of a larger connector, or is that a transformer-type device? That does seem to be the cleanest remedy, but I'm having a hard time finding something like that online that won't need some home fabrication.

Thanks for your thoughts.
 

guswah

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A Thin Mini-ITX Form Factor motherboard differs from Mini-ITX. You didn't get the latter.

The Q87T motherboard is for an All-in-One system. All-in-One PC cases were introduced about five years ago, but the concept for building them never caught on.

Here are an example of some discontinued models:
https://www.quietpc.com/mono-aio

OEM PC makers are still selling AIO pre-built models but bare cases for them seem to be discontinued due to lack of interest. Thin-Mini ITX motherboards were designed so people could replace a motherboard in an All-In-One PC.
https://www.newegg.com/acer-z24-880-ur13-aspire-all-in-one-pc/p/N82E16883101606?Item=N82E16883101606&Tpk=N82E16883101606
 

guswah

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Yes, Calvin, I get it now. I imagine that using a board like this in one of those fancy Acer or HP all-in-one computers would also be cheaper than buying an OEM board.

I've actually put mine into a ThermalTake Core V1 case. Interestingly that case calls for a mini ITX form factor -- not specifically a "Thin"mini ITX. Still it fits perfectly and screw holes all line up as they should.
 
This is all news to me. Until now I'd never heard of 19v. Indeed there is a connector on the I/O panel for "DC power connector", but not a stitch of information in the manual about a specific power device that should be used or what would be the correct amperage. Very weird.

The "internal DC converter plug" you mention -- is that merely a plug that creates two leads out of a larger connector, or is that a transformer-type device? That does seem to be the cleanest remedy, but I'm having a hard time finding something like that online that won't need some home fabrication.

Thanks for your thoughts.
mainboard doesnt have ac/dc transformer on its own
so u have to connect DC input there
http://www.manualsdir.com/manuals/303350/asus-q87t.html?page=23
from your manuals

u will still need other dyi stuffs to power up your devices
here some random reading
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s2s-8VnRrqk
 
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guswah

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But I presume that if I do a step-up conversion from the PSU to 19v for the main board power, then as long as my standard PSU is installed, I can power my SSDs in the usual way?
 

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