Question ATX Power Connectors/ Convertor?

Pez

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Jul 26, 2008
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Hi all.

I posted a message on the board recently ( https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/cpu-socket-backwards-compatibility.3728324/ ) My Intel Core i7 7700K processor is 7th generation, and the socket is a 1151, and it turned out there are more recent motherboards with a 1151 socket, but, they're like a "Version 2", and support 8th & 9th generation, and are not backwards compatible with my processor.

So, after searching around, I found a motherboard that supports my generation processor & socket: An ASUS PRIME B250M-PLUS. When I purchased it, there was something that did NOT catch my eye: The motherboard has the two ATX power connectors, the 24-pin and the 4-pin. My Corsair HX 1050 watt PSU has a 24-pin connector and......an 8-pin connector.

While searching these forums, I came across another post that mentions the same motherboard and processor I have; what a coincidence!! (https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/b250-4-pin-cpu-power-connector.3709364/)

But here's what I want to find out since I don't think this was covered in the other post: I think there might be, but want to make sure: Are there converter cables sold that will take my existing 8-pin cable coming from my PSU and convert it to a 4-pin so I can plug it into this ASUS motherboard? If this can be done safely, I'd rather do this than to have to buy another PSU just to get the ATX 4-pin connector.

Thanks for any info;
Pez
 
You got a few things right, and a few wrong.
While the socket on z170, z270, z370 and z390 (or the b series versions..) is the same,
z170 was intended for 6th gen, and could be upgraded to 7th gen when that launched, and z270 was intended for 7th gen, but could also run 6th gen.
And z370-z390 were the same for 8th and 9th.
While the socket is physically the same, the chipset and rom on the board are different.
(Intel could have made it work. They just decided not to. There are some "special sauce" chinese motherboards that allow all 6th-9th gen... Don't buy them though.)

Also, the 8/4 pin connector you are talking about is the EPS 8 pin, not the ATX 8 pin. the ATX is for your graphics card and is split into 6+2, the EPS is split into 4+4.
If you disconnect the 8 pin eps connector from your current board, you'd see that it splits into 4+4. You can connect the 4 pins, and leave the other 4 dangling and the board will work.
I would get a better board either way.
A board with only a 4 pin connector was not made for an i7.
Get a cheap Z270 or Z170 board. The i7 7700k is a good overclocker. you will be able to get it 5-6 hundred mhz higher.
 

Pez

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Hi siaan312; thanks for your response.

Ahhh, the EPS 8 pin, not the ATX 8 pin; I did not realize that.

I took a look at my 8-pin, and yes, I saw what you meant: Even though it's a total of 8, it is like 4 and 4 (even though it's not physically split, it's not like I can pull them apart.

But yes, you're right, I can still plug it in using half (4 pins), then the other unused half of the other 4 pins is just next to the plug on the motherboard, not really plugged into anything.

And I know you suggest to get a better board, but for now that's not my intention; I just wanted something to get by with until a future date when I can put together a whole other new system build (and when finances are better).

My previous board was an Aorus Z270X Gaming 8 Motherboard, and that was a nice board.

Pez
 

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