Question Basic reminders for terminating a new ethernet line for a first timer???

axlrose

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I got a few lines run through my ethernetless home probably two months ago, and then the end of the school year got really busy and I never finished off the lines and attaching the wifi hardware. Can anyone remind me how to do it? I haven't done it before and thought I taught myself enough to understand a few months ago, but then I never actually tried doing it and I think it all slipped my memory. :)

Thanks.
 

axlrose

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How about this...prepare for some ultra technical terminology here... :)

  1. cable from the wall
  2. termination piece (female-ish) with individual strands in the correct spots punched
  3. back of face plate
  4. smaller termination piece (male-ish) on measured, stationary patch cable that runs from device to the face plate
sound roughly right?
 

axlrose

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Wall plates just have open squares. The piece behind them, that I need to terminate the interior cable with, is larger than the smaller piece I need to terminated the exterior cable with.
 

kanewolf

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If your wall plates just have square holes. Then what you put in that hole is a keystone jack -- http://www.vericomsolutions.com/p-4148-keystone-jacks.aspx
With a keystone jack you do a type of termination called punchdown. You still follow the 568B color coding, but you push each wire into a slot in the keystone jack with a punchdown tool That will provide a wall jack that a standard RJ45 will connect to. I don't recommend terminating your own patch cables any more. Commercial cables are so cheap it just isn't worth the hassle.
If you are doing in-wall cabling, I recommend you get a simple continuity tester like this -- https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004CI9NRM/
 
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axlrose

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So I have these keystones
https://www.monoprice.com/product?c_id=303&cp_id=30204&cs_id=3030727&p_id=15664&seq=1&format=2
so I don't think I need any tools for that end.

I have these rj45's.
https://www.monoprice.com/product?c_id=303&cp_id=30308&cs_id=3030704&p_id=34418&seq=1&format=2

First timer, so I have no specialized tools. Suggestions on what I need to terminate the two ends as far as specific tools go? It's a nice, cold, rainy day today so I'm inclined to stay inside and work in the house on networking cable today instead of doing outdoor projects. :)

Thanks guys.

If I haven't said before, I think I have 12 of these to do.
 

AllanGH

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Home Depot: 8P8C crimper, and a meter to check for cable shorts and open circuits.

There are inexpensive cable testers available (Home Depot also), but my hand always lands on the Fluke DMM, so I just go with that.

Double- and triple-check those keystones, though.....those "toolless" options always seem to be a bit lackluster in the "firm connection" department. I have often found myself having to solder a wire, here and there, to make up for poor tension in some of those IDC grooves.
 
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axlrose

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Thanks. I've heard that too, so the tester is probably a good idea. Seems to me when I was looking for cat 6a keystones, finding something that wasn't toolless and not uberexpensive was very difficult. I guess if they don't work well, it's not a huge hassle to take the plate off and try something different.
 

axlrose

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Okay, dumb question, when I look for crimpers quick online before going to the store, I see 8p8c and I see 6p6c, but I don't see 8p6c. Want to make sure I get the right thing. Guessing 8p6c does 8 and 6???
 

kanewolf

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Get some cheap RJ45s and scrap wire. Practice. Put on a connector, test it. Cut it off and do it again. 3 or 4 ft of wire will let you do a dozen terminations. It should take about 3 inches of wire per termination. Strip the cover 2 inches. Get the wires straight, in the correct color code. Pinch them between your thumb and forefinger. Trim them to the appropriate 1/2 inch or so. Then feed them into the RJ45 and crimp. Verify the color code. Test with a continuity meter.
 

Ralston18

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If possible, go back and check those wire runs for hard bends, kinks, twists, pinches, nail or staple penetrations - any physical damage. You may realize that the cable(s) were not correctly or properly run.

On both ends of any wires that you run leave a "service loop" inside the wall so there is some extra wire already in place in case some termination does need to be redone. Do not staple down that loop.

Mark the wires on both ends so you know which wires at the patch panel go to which wall jacks in each room. And put the same information on the inside of the cover plate for the wall jack. Draw out a general sketch. If you have a copy of the house floor plan use that to show where the wires are run. Document the runs and take photos for reference purposes. Especially in hard to get to areas. Saving a trip into the attic is generally a good thing..... All the more so for a crawl space.....

Plugs: wires are stranded and solid. Ensure that you use the correct/applicable plugs. If you do the practice terminations and crimps (as suggested above and that you should do) you will probably discover any mismatches. And per @AllanGH do pay attention to the RJ-45's orientation. I.e., clip pointed away from you.
 

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