kumarayush2104

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Jun 9, 2018
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Hello everyone, I have HP Pavillion Notebook 15-AU624TX, its almost 4 years old and battery is also almost 4 years old, Now I am getting a warning like "FOR OPTIMAL USAGE HP RECOMMENDS YOU CHANGE YOUR BATTERY AS YOUR BATTERY'S CYCLE IN ONLY 23% LEFT" . By this statement I feel like Battery is now dead

WINDOWS:

When I connect charger and boot windows, "windows says 100% Charged" but according to my laptop charging light (orange while charging and white while fully charged) is orange only that means according to motherboard its not fully charged. but when I disconnect the adapter, it stays for around 30 mins (or more than that ), that means battery is getting charged.

LINUX:

I have tried installing Linux, on Linux the battery shows "0%" and doesnt get up no matter how longer you keep connecting your charger, and it seems like the battery doesnt charge because after disconnecting the ac cable the laptop stays for 5 minutes then turns off.

FIRMWARE LEVEL:

HP have UEFI Hardware Diagnostic at firmware level (before booting), it shows the battery is 99% charger and only 23% cycles left

I want to know where is the problem either its some INTERNAL WIRES or BATTERY or AC ADAPTER.

If its battery should I replace it immediately or can I keep using that ?
 
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kumarayush2104

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Jun 9, 2018
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I would advise that you replace the battery as soon as you can. You don't want the battery to swell and become a health hazard.
Sir, thanks for your advice

i want to know that do random battery numbers sometimes its full or sometimes its empty, is that a battery issue only or maybe some issues with the adapter or motherboard ?
 
Jul 29, 2021
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Believe me, it's very rarely a battery issue.
Rather, most of times this is the result of a perfectly planned obsolescence of the battery: this is part of the planned profit for all the PC distribution chain.
In the BEV market (Battery Electric Vehicle) since the lithium battery is extremely expensive, all the car makers warn the customers NOT TO KEEP THE LITHIUM AT MAX. CHARGE LEVEL for a long time.
Please, ask yourself why.
Even lithium battery manufacturers themselves, stock and distribute their products at 40% charge level, nothing more!
Please again, ask yourself why.
Moreover, all the "intelligent" software which manages the battery cannot precisely measure the battery levels, because it only relies upon a couple of the needed parameters (tipically it acquires only the voltage... but ignores the ageing, the types of charge/recharge cycles, the temperature/current ratio, the storage temperatures cycles, and so on...).
So it happens very often that a battery is assumed as "faulty" or "died" even if this is not the case. But nobody cares: the lithium industry works, the PC maker raises its profit, the maker's technicians sell as good their ridiculous software, and even the final customer itself becomes happy, because "...that's OK, I am protected by the technology"
Is there a solution?
Unfortunately, PC makers stay well clear of giving the customer the choice to stop charging the battery before 100%. Furthermore, both in PCs and in mobile phones and tablets, the makers tend to fix it internally, and often to solder the battery terminals to the circuit, to prevent the customer from removing the battery before it reaches 100% of the charge.
Many mobile phone manufacturers (Samsung, Huawei ...) have even begun to prevent their customers from turning off their mobile phones at night, thus preventing the reduction of the number of charge/discharge cycles!
But nobody cares.
In many cases, lithium batteries can be reactivated (like the huge ones in BEVs), but by applying techniques that are still little known. Yet equally unfortunately, you cannot act in any way except by opening the casing, since the "level measurement" circuits usually resides inside the battery... and the mere thought of opening the battery case activates all kinds of terror and safety alarms.

So Lutfij is right when says "...a sign that your battery is in need of replacement". But please, keep in mind that in most cases it is NOT a battery problem. It's a PC (and cellphones) manufacturer's planning.
And this generates a crazy waste of energy and raw materials ... which become CO2 unnecessarily produced.
 

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