[SOLVED] battery of wireless mouse running out too fast??

brannsiu

Honorable
Apr 20, 2013
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My mouse is a Microsoft wireless mouse of pink color, I forget the model, but it's less than $15 I remember.
It's powered by one piece of AAA battery. In the past, I did not turn off the mouse when I don't use the computer one AAA battery could stay up to 2-3 months of time before red light (means running out of battery) warns but recently I always turn off the mouse but it ran out faster than I expected, in less than ONE month.

Should I just let the mouse stay ON always without turning it on and off so frequently which would be even better for the battery life???
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
No. Turning it off will ALWAYS result in the battery lasting longer than leaving it on all the time. No way around that.

It's possible that the difference you are seeing is the fact that you are using batteries that have already been sitting around in the drawer OR on the shelf, or if you are ordering them online, on somebody else's shelves, for much longer than the ones you purchased originally or when you first purchased them.

If these are batteries you've had for a while sitting in a drawer, they are not going to last as long as they did when you first bought them.

If these are batteries you just bought, then I'd pay attention to the date code on the package they came in because there are OFTEN problems with batteries that have been sitting around unsold for a number of years and then you come along and buy them, and they don't last as long as you would expect them to. If buying online, always look at the reviews for that product AND for that specific seller, to see if they are selling batteries that are already beyond the recommended date code. If the date code isn't within a year of the current date, avoid them. If you can't verify either way, avoid them. Honestly, you are better off buying batteries locally in most cases unless you live in a region where they are not readily available at reasonable prices in which case you then need to pay attention to what you are ordering online because not all batteries are going to have the same lifespan even if they are exactly the same type of batteries.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
No. Turning it off will ALWAYS result in the battery lasting longer than leaving it on all the time. No way around that.

It's possible that the difference you are seeing is the fact that you are using batteries that have already been sitting around in the drawer OR on the shelf, or if you are ordering them online, on somebody else's shelves, for much longer than the ones you purchased originally or when you first purchased them.

If these are batteries you've had for a while sitting in a drawer, they are not going to last as long as they did when you first bought them.

If these are batteries you just bought, then I'd pay attention to the date code on the package they came in because there are OFTEN problems with batteries that have been sitting around unsold for a number of years and then you come along and buy them, and they don't last as long as you would expect them to. If buying online, always look at the reviews for that product AND for that specific seller, to see if they are selling batteries that are already beyond the recommended date code. If the date code isn't within a year of the current date, avoid them. If you can't verify either way, avoid them. Honestly, you are better off buying batteries locally in most cases unless you live in a region where they are not readily available at reasonable prices in which case you then need to pay attention to what you are ordering online because not all batteries are going to have the same lifespan even if they are exactly the same type of batteries.
 

brannsiu

Honorable
Apr 20, 2013
774
3
10,985
0
No. Turning it off will ALWAYS result in the battery lasting longer than leaving it on all the time. No way around that.

It's possible that the difference you are seeing is the fact that you are using batteries that have already been sitting around in the drawer OR on the shelf, or if you are ordering them online, on somebody else's shelves, for much longer than the ones you purchased originally or when you first purchased them.

If these are batteries you've had for a while sitting in a drawer, they are not going to last as long as they did when you first bought them.

A 3M mousepad markets to save 50% of battery. Could a better surface really save the battery of a mouse??

If these are batteries you just bought, then I'd pay attention to the date code on the package they came in because there are OFTEN problems with batteries that have been sitting around unsold for a number of years and then you come along and buy them, and they don't last as long as you would expect them to. If buying online, always look at the reviews for that product AND for that specific seller, to see if they are selling batteries that are already beyond the recommended date code. If the date code isn't within a year of the current date, avoid them. If you can't verify either way, avoid them. Honestly, you are better off buying batteries locally in most cases unless you live in a region where they are not readily available at reasonable prices in which case you then need to pay attention to what you are ordering online because not all batteries are going to have the same lifespan even if they are exactly the same type of batteries.
Thanks for your detailed explanation

but in fact the batteries were all from one box set I purchased earlier, the battery shouldn't be a variable. But I will still keep the habit of turning off the mouse when not in use.

But, could the mousepad be the reason? Because I think I haven't even wiped the mousepad for long time and it was full of dust and dirt
 
You could always replace it. I have a cheap little HP wireless mouse that uses two AAA batteries and it lasts a long time with heavy use. The single battery in yours is only going to last for so long, but turning it off when you're away for a while can help some.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Even within the same set, if the date code is old, there can be VERY different results. I have, recently in fact, found old large packages of AA and AAA batteries that were unopened, in a drawer that had not been used in about five years.

Testing the batteries in those packages with a volt meter revealed the fact that some of the batteries had less than 1v, which means they were not going to last very long OR work at all in some cases, while other batteries from the same package had a full 1.5v and were ok. Even a package of batteries that you just bought, especially if you bought them online, could be old. I have ordered batteries through vendors on Amazon and Ebay and when I received them I discovered that they were years old and that most batteries in the packages were not at full voltage and either didn't work or ran down quickly.

The best thing to do is get a volt meter and test each battery before use. If they are not at a full 1.5v then they may still work, but they are not going to last very long.
 

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