Discussion BD Ripper (s) that Unlocks Zoom & Slow-Motion Functions?

soundtrek

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A long enjoyed perk with DVD movies is where you can choose to zoom in on the action, thereby gaining a more intimate experience with choice scenes. Of course, DVD's relatively low resolution degrades some of that close-up experience, but depending on the quality of the original source material and of the DVD mastering, using zoom and slow-motion can still add to the fun.

But when I finally wised up and started buying BDs instead of DVDs to help future proof my collection I sadly discovered that none of my BDs allow me to use my Cambridge 650BD player's zoom control. Recently, I learned that this evil deed was the work of the BluRay Association who early on had imposed Oracle's BD-J . https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BD-J Apparently, BD-J is part of a platform upon which runs most authoring software used to create a commercial BD movie's menu, special features and so forth, and which also allows the studio to add not only region lockouts but also disabling basic functionality, like zoom and maybe also slow-motion.

More insidiously, around 2008 the BD Association required all BD player manufacturers to include a chip which forces compliance with BD-J lockout features.

I'm in the US where I believe we are allowed to backup or rip one copy of each DVD or BD from our own collection. I've yet to attempt to rip even a DVD, if only because my ancient desktops could then run Vegas editing software to make a few choice a/v changes in a few scenes. That will change next year when I install a desktop with an i7 8700 or better cpu and respectably fast rendering Nvidia graphics, following purchase of a Sony OLED TV. Indeed, I was agonizing over the looming need to trash my DVD collection until this week at Best Buy when I watched a borrowed DVD of "Molly's Game" on a 55 and 65" Sony A8F OLED. Its upscaling processor made the DVD look seriously very good to almost excellent. The most noticeable flaw may have been just the smallest amount of softness around her face in the lawyer's office. And objects in the background may or may not have appeared a bit fuzzy. To my eyes overall definition and color looked too good to complain about, nor any anticipated eye fatigue. So I won't have to think about trashing at least my well mastered DVDs if I go with that OLED TV-though I probably would have much preferred if 1080p OLEDs were still available.

Presumably, one could zoom and slo-mo BDs when playing them on VLC or other open source or proprietary software video players, if there's no BD Association chip in BD drives to recognize any on-disc lockouts, and software players accomplish zoom and slo-mo differently anyway.

But are there one or more ripping software that can restore zoom and slow-motion functionality to BDs for use in standalone Panasonic, Cambridge and other hardware players?

If yes, which is the easiest to learn Windows 10 compatible DVD/BD ripping software for newbies or dummies?

Slightly off topic questions: Are the closed captioned for hearing impaired and non-english subtitles located in specific folders? Ditto "coming attractions"?

And can most BD ripper (s) allow me to easily delete them?

Some of here are talking about X265
https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/encoding-of-choice-for-dvd-rips.3390368/
Pardon my ignorance, but is the preferred format for encoding 1080p? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X265

And is the latest revision of X265, or an equal or better encoding scheme, included in most BD ripping software? And is it selected and enabled merely via the ripping software's user interface, before you go to burn your finished and saved lock out and/or other changes in DVD or BD folders to a blank DVD or BD-RE?
 
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soundtrek

Distinguished
Oct 11, 2009
22
0
18,510
0
A long enjoyed perk with DVD movies is where you can choose to zoom in on the action, thereby gaining a more intimate experience with choice scenes. Of course, DVD's relatively low resolution degrades some of that close-up experience, but depending on the quality of the original source material, DVD mastering and the upscaling power of the 2K or 4K player or TV, using zoom and slow-motion can still add to the fun.

But when I finally wised up and started buying BDs instead of DVDs to help future proof my collection I sadly discovered that none of my BDs allow me to use my Cambridge 650BD player's zoom control. Recently, I learned that this evil deed was the work of the BluRay Association, who early on had imposed Oracle's BD-J . https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BD-J Apparently, BD-J is part of a platform upon which runs most authoring software used to create a commercial BD movie's menu, special features and so forth, and which also allows the studio to add not only region lockouts but basic functionality disabling of zoom and maybe also slow-motion.

More insidiously, around 2008 the BD Association required all BD player manufacturers to include a chip which forces compliance with BD-J lockout features.

I'm in the US where I believe we are allowed to backup or rip one copy of each DVD or
BD from our own collection. I know better than attempting to rip a DVD with my ancient desktops. That will change next year when I install a desktop with an i7 8700 or better cpu and respectably fast rendering Nvidia graphics, following purchase of a Sony OLED TV. Though I don’t intend to seduce myself with 4K content for a long time, I was agonizing over the looming need to trash my DVD collection until this week at Best Buy when I watched the DVD of "Molly's Game" on a 55 and 65" Sony A8F OLED. Its upscaling processor made the DVD look seriously good to almost excellent. The most noticeable flaw may have been somewhat less definition of her face in the lawyer's office. And objects in the background may or may not have appeared a bit fuzzy. To my eyes overall definition and color looked too good to complain about, nor of any anticipated eye fatigue. So I won't have to think about trashing at least my well mastered DVDs if I go with that OLED TV-though I probably would have much preferred if 1080p OLEDs were still available.

Presumably, one could zoom and slo-mo BDs with VLC or other open source or proprietary software video players, if there's no BD Association chip in BD drives
to recognize any on-disc lockouts. And software players accomplish zoom and
slo-mo differently anyway.

But are there one or more ripping software that can restore zoom and slow-motion functionality to BDs for use in standalone Panasonic, Cambridge and other hardware players?

If yes, which Windows 10 compatible DVD/BD ripping software are the easiest to
learn for newbies or dummies?

Slightly off topic questions: Are the closed captioned for hearing impaired and
non-english subtitles located in specific folders?

Ditto "coming attractions"?

And can most BD ripper (s) allow me to easily delete them?

Some here are talking about X265
Pardon my ignorance, but is that the preferred format for encoding 1080p? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X265

And is the latest revision of X265, or an equal or better encoding scheme, included
in most BD ripping software?

And is it selected and enabled merely via the ripping software's user interface,
before you go to burn your finished and saved changes in DVD or BD folders to
a blank DVD or BD-RE?
 

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