[SOLVED] Be quiet! Pure Base 500 Tempered Glass vs. Corsair Carbide 275R Tempered Glass (non Airflow version)

Phaaze88

Splendid
Ambassador
How does the H510 stack up against the PB 500?
That chassis is unique. It's marketed for negative pressure(exhaust is stronger than intake) and is preinstalled with a rear and top exhaust fan.
The stock config has been shown to be the best overall - as far as air cooling is concerned, anyways. Link #1. Link #2.
I would save the front panel for a 240/280mm AIO to cool the cpu or gpu, depending on which is the hotter component.

All that said, the chassis does have it's downsides, the primary one being the kind of hardware it can accommodate.
It struggles with both a high power consuming cpu and gpu - for example, a 9900K + 2080Ti.
You'd only be able to cool one - the 2080Ti, in this situation - so that leaves the 9900K to be cooled on air, which technically, should be fine, but you can forget about overclocking it.
NZXT did answer this shortcoming with their H700 series.

I don't think you'll be able to avoid using liquid cooling in any of those cases if your hardware consists of a 9900K-like cpu and a 2080 Super or higher power consuming gpu.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
The only real 'newer' features would be front panel usb type-C and/or 3.1. Other than that, there's really nothing 'new' about anything. Tool-less, shrouds, all that stuff has been around for years, and really doesn't change the build unless you are aiming for something more specific, like hdd bays under the shroud, fully modular insides etc. Which still isn't a 'new' concept, just a not widely used concept as it requires more work put into design and build structurely of the frame.

Very easy to punch out a motherboard tray, rivet it into place and never worry about the pc really warping. Miss a couple of screws on a modular design and you'll have the Leaning Tower of PC as soon as you put liquid in the rads.
 

lolermanlols123

Commendable
Mar 2, 2018
88
0
1,640
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That chassis is unique. It's marketed for negative pressure(exhaust is stronger than intake) and is preinstalled with a rear and top exhaust fan.
The stock config has been shown to be the best overall - as far as air cooling is concerned, anyways. Link #1. Link #2.
I would save the front panel for a 240/280mm AIO to cool the cpu or gpu, depending on which is the hotter component.

All that said, the chassis does have it's downsides, the primary one being the kind of hardware it can accommodate.
It struggles with both a high power consuming cpu and gpu - for example, a 9900K + 2080Ti.
You'd only be able to cool one - the 2080Ti, in this situation - so that leaves the 9900K to be cooled on air, which technically, should be fine, but you can forget about overclocking it.
NZXT did answer this shortcoming with their H700 series.

I don't think you'll be able to avoid using liquid cooling in any of those cases if your hardware consists of a 9900K-like cpu and a 2080 Super or higher power consuming gpu.
What are your thoughts on the H510 Elite that has a Ryzen 3600 + 2080 Super with a 280mm radiator in the front, 120mm fan in the rear and 140mm at the top? Would one achieve acceptable temps on both the CPU and GPU?
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
Pcie riser mounted? There's only 1 drawback to that, everything else is a bonus. But the drawback can be a deal breaker. The height of the card.

Most of the higher power cards are 2.5-3 slot cards, and even in cases built for such, there's very little room left between the fans and the case side. So while case temps benefit, exhaust benefits from a straight up shot, the card can suffer from starvation of airflow and actually run hotter. Many case designs don't even use 3 slot riser, you'll find most are only 2 slot riser. Just for that reason.

Otherwise the case would by necessity be a good inch wider, which changes everything from frame to hdd bays, even form factor at times.

Riser cards are usually best suited for a full custom loop, where the waterblock is what's visible and requires no consideration for ventilation or airflow.

Many SFF cases use pcie riser for the gpu, but that's a space using design and the case side will usually be direct airflow intake on the gpu, not a TG side panel.
 

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