[SOLVED] Been running a Ryzen 7 5800X for 3 weeks. Wondering about the temperature range seems appropriate for the HSF

RareAir23

Prominent
Jun 10, 2020
29
7
535
0
Hi all. So I've had a Ryzen 7 5800X CPU on my rig for about 3 weeks now. It is being cooled by a Scythe Mugen 5 Rev. B air cooled HSF using Arctic MX4 thermal compound. The temperature range usually sites between 36C when not doing anything at all to 85C when really going (in Outriders and The Division 2 it sits between 72C and 85C). When web browsing, listening to iTunes, working in Office, going through email it sits between 44C and 62C. For the HSF I'm using with this CPU I was wondering: is this is the kind of temperature range I should be expecting with the combination of parts in play? Thanks in advance for your thoughts and until next time I am out!
 
@drea.drechsler the P400A I got does have a mesh front. I think my fan controller can fit 2 more fans at the top (either 120mm or 140mm) so I might consider adding 2 more soon. I run the current fans I have off of the P400A's fan controller at the moment because while the Crosshair VIII Hero could run each fan off the board when I built the machine at first and looked at how the fan ports on the mobo were placed I knew the cable management would be a most of the day job. In this case, I might consider doing it. Also I should mention that the temps I reported were straight off a non-OCed 5800X. It's running straight stock at the moment (except for the DOCP profile on my memory). Out!
Two more 140's exhausting at the top would probably do a trick. They help set up a strong flow stream to pull the air through and out, and not circle around in eddy currents. That's the idea, at least.

I understand the wiring...but you can probably make the job a lot easier with some 'Y' splitters as then you'd only have three connectors that need to find a header on the motherboard.
 

alexbirdie

Notable
Feb 20, 2020
415
83
840
37
The 5800x is a hotrunnung CPU (full 142W, but only one chip-die for heat-dissipation).

Your temperature are quite normal. But simply google for "5800x temperature", and you will get a lot of tests and user-postings for comparing with your's.

But if you like:

Set PBO to manual . Standard values of PPT, TDC and EDC are 142 95 140. Set PPT to 90-120,TDC ( simply try it) , TDC and EDC to "auto" and check temperatures.

I suppose, you will not feel any performance degradation at all.

And undervolt CPU to about -0.05 to -0.1 volt( that depends on your CPU, because every silicon is different).

There are some more sophisticated tools like curve editor, clock tuner etc. to control voltage and frequency of cores more differently. But because I do not have a ZEN3-CPU, I do not have any experience with them.
 
Hi all. So I've had a Ryzen 7 5800X CPU on my rig for about 3 weeks now. It is being cooled by a Scythe Mugen 5 Rev. B air cooled HSF using Arctic MX4 thermal compound. The temperature range usually sites between 36C when not doing anything at all to 85C when really going (in Outriders and The Division 2 it sits between 72C and 85C). When web browsing, listening to iTunes, working in Office, going through email it sits between 44C and 62C. For the HSF I'm using with this CPU I was wondering: is this is the kind of temperature range I should be expecting with the combination of parts in play? Thanks in advance for your thoughts and until next time I am out!
That's a proper 'monster' HSF and should be adequate even for a 5800X but any air cooling is only as good as case ventilation, so a bit more on system details would help. Specifically: what case and how many/type of case fans and how are they arranged (intakes and exhausts)? And what GPU?

In particular, gaming doesn't present a truely heavy "all-core" workload so those high temps (up to 85C) suggest hot air from the GPU is being recirculated by the CPU cooler instead of being exhausted so it's actually warming instead of cooling the CPU.

A simple test: open your case side panel and direct a small personal fan to blow outside air in front of the CPU HSF. If it runs a lot cooler then you'll know case ventilation is an issue.
 
Last edited:

RareAir23

Prominent
Jun 10, 2020
29
7
535
0
Hi all. @drea.drechsler, here's what I got for you. I'm running my Ryzen 7 5800X CPU on an ASUS ROG Crosshair VIII Hero X570 mobo with an eVGA GeForce RTX 3080 XC3 Ultra video card in the PCI-e slot. My fan formation is 2 Noctua 140mm Chromax Black fans in the front for intake and a Noctua Chromax Black 120mm fan in the back for exhaust. They are connected to my Phanteks Eclipse P400A mid-tower ATX case and its built-in fan controller running at medium speed setting. Hope that helps. Thanks. Out!
 

Zerk2012

Titan
Ambassador
Hi all. @drea.drechsler, here's what I got for you. I'm running my Ryzen 7 5800X CPU on an ASUS ROG Crosshair VIII Hero X570 mobo with an eVGA GeForce RTX 3080 XC3 Ultra video card in the PCI-e slot. My fan formation is 2 Noctua 140mm Chromax Black fans in the front for intake and a Noctua Chromax Black 120mm fan in the back for exhaust. They are connected to my Phanteks Eclipse P400A mid-tower ATX case and its built-in fan controller running at medium speed setting. Hope that helps. Thanks. Out!
I would turn the fans to high when gaming or during a high work load.

EDIT haven't had much to do with the 5XXX processors but usually with AMD you get a higher boost speed with lower temps.
 
Hi all. @drea.drechsler, here's what I got for you. I'm running my Ryzen 7 5800X CPU on an ASUS ROG Crosshair VIII Hero X570 mobo with an eVGA GeForce RTX 3080 XC3 Ultra video card in the PCI-e slot. My fan formation is 2 Noctua 140mm Chromax Black fans in the front for intake and a Noctua Chromax Black 120mm fan in the back for exhaust. They are connected to my Phanteks Eclipse P400A mid-tower ATX case and its built-in fan controller running at medium speed setting. Hope that helps. Thanks. Out!
I'm not sure about your case...does it have a mesh front so the front fans can draw air easily? If so, that's what you need.

You might consider putting some more exhaust fans in the top as I do think it can handle them there. The two 140's in front would move a lot of air in (especially if it's a front mesh) but that one 120 in the rear isn't going to keep up so the air spins in circles until finding it's way out where ever it can. That's an easy way for the exhaust of the 3080 to wind up feeding the intake of the Mugen. Also consider raising fan speed, or putting them on a curve using motherboard headers. I think the CHVIII boards should have plenty enough headers and you should be able to run two or three fans off each with splitters.
 

RareAir23

Prominent
Jun 10, 2020
29
7
535
0
@drea.drechsler the P400A I got does have a mesh front. I think my fan controller can fit 2 more fans at the top (either 120mm or 140mm) so I might consider adding 2 more soon. I run the current fans I have off of the P400A's fan controller at the moment because while the Crosshair VIII Hero could run each fan off the board when I built the machine at first and looked at how the fan ports on the mobo were placed I knew the cable management would be a most of the day job. In this case, I might consider doing it. Also I should mention that the temps I reported were straight off a non-OCed 5800X. It's running straight stock at the moment (except for the DOCP profile on my memory). Out!
 
@drea.drechsler the P400A I got does have a mesh front. I think my fan controller can fit 2 more fans at the top (either 120mm or 140mm) so I might consider adding 2 more soon. I run the current fans I have off of the P400A's fan controller at the moment because while the Crosshair VIII Hero could run each fan off the board when I built the machine at first and looked at how the fan ports on the mobo were placed I knew the cable management would be a most of the day job. In this case, I might consider doing it. Also I should mention that the temps I reported were straight off a non-OCed 5800X. It's running straight stock at the moment (except for the DOCP profile on my memory). Out!
Two more 140's exhausting at the top would probably do a trick. They help set up a strong flow stream to pull the air through and out, and not circle around in eddy currents. That's the idea, at least.

I understand the wiring...but you can probably make the job a lot easier with some 'Y' splitters as then you'd only have three connectors that need to find a header on the motherboard.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY