[SOLVED] Beginners Question

Jul 4, 2019
16
0
10
0
So, the topic of ssds has been stumping me. I can't grasp the how and why of ssds. So, do I HAVE to install windows onto the ssd for it to be functional, or is it just a regular thing to do. Can I just install my ssd, then boot up my computer like normal, and if I do will it work, or will it do something? The only reason I am buying an ssd is to have some extra storage, I am not trying to migrate to it, or to move my OS to it. If there is anything I am not realizing, please point it out. I am pretty new to computers, but I know my way around them, I thought ssds would be easy, but they are quite hard. I thought that it would be an install then I could use it, but im not sure anymore. Thanks for the answers, for I am very confused about this and need some proper help. PS: Sorry if you saw my post earlier and think this is a little repetitive, but I think I needed to reword my questions to get some answers I so desperately need.
 
Assuming you currently have a single HD C: drive...

Just plug in the SSD and it should come up as D: automatically. Sometimes you have to partition and format it before D: comes up. Hope that's not too much detail for you.

From then on, you will download your games into D: specify D: when downloading. Do not take default, which is C:

Thereafter, running those games, will load from faster D: don't expect mega miracle speeds.

The problem am seeing is, 256 gig is very little space for today's games, u may find out, very very soon, you are out of space again. But I get the gist u just wanna play with SSD see what it does.
 

jimmysmitty

Polypheme
Moderator
The main purpose of an SSD is the performance gains over a HDD it brings. Those benefits are sen mainly for OS and booting tasks, not just storage. If you want just storage a HDD is still the way to go.

Basically most newer setups use a SSD or NVMe SSD for the OS, applications and some games while longer term storage is relegated to a HDD since HDDs have a much better $/GB than SSDs. So pictures, movies, music etc would go there while the OS would go on your SSD.

If you get say a Samsung they typically come with a migration software that would allow you to move your system as is to the SSD.

However if you decide you want to buy an SSD for storage only you can install it and when you boot the PC it will need to be initialized and formatted. After that it will be assigned, or you can pick, a drive leter and will be useable. I still recommend against that as it is a much higher $/GB to pay just for storage.
 
Jul 4, 2019
16
0
10
0
The main purpose of an SSD is the performance gains over a HDD it brings. Those benefits are sen mainly for OS and booting tasks, not just storage. If you want just storage a HDD is still the way to go.

Basically most newer setups use a SSD or NVMe SSD for the OS, applications and some games while longer term storage is relegated to a HDD since HDDs have a much better $/GB than SSDs. So pictures, movies, music etc would go there while the OS would go on your SSD.

If you get say a Samsung they typically come with a migration software that would allow you to move your system as is to the SSD.

However if you decide you want to buy an SSD for storage only you can install it and when you boot the PC it will need to be initialized and formatted. After that it will be assigned, or you can pick, a drive leter and will be useable. I still recommend against that as it is a much higher $/GB to pay just for storage.
Thanks for the fast response, I didn't get a big one, just 256gb. I wasn't really sure what I was getting myself into it seems. I will try and learn what to do so I dont fuck anything up!
 
Jul 4, 2019
16
0
10
0
The main purpose of an SSD is the performance gains over a HDD it brings. Those benefits are sen mainly for OS and booting tasks, not just storage. If you want just storage a HDD is still the way to go.

Basically most newer setups use a SSD or NVMe SSD for the OS, applications and some games while longer term storage is relegated to a HDD since HDDs have a much better $/GB than SSDs. So pictures, movies, music etc would go there while the OS would go on your SSD.

If you get say a Samsung they typically come with a migration software that would allow you to move your system as is to the SSD.

However if you decide you want to buy an SSD for storage only you can install it and when you boot the PC it will need to be initialized and formatted. After that it will be assigned, or you can pick, a drive leter and will be useable. I still recommend against that as it is a much higher $/GB to pay just for storage.
One more question. If I were to use it as I had it in mind, would putting games on it such as rust, help the loading times still? Because that was the main reason was to help the loading times for games. If it will not do this I will have to learn how to format it to my liking.
 
Jul 4, 2019
16
0
10
0
Yes it will improve load times but not help in getting more Frames per second.
So it is as simple as hooking it up and booting up the computer like normal? Becuase people made a big deal on yt on having to install windows and such, but I wasn't really looking to do all that. I was getting worried I had ordered an ssd not knowing what I would have to do. But if I can just put my games on there and help the load times, then that is worth for me.
 
Assuming you currently have a single HD C: drive...

Just plug in the SSD and it should come up as D: automatically. Sometimes you have to partition and format it before D: comes up. Hope that's not too much detail for you.

From then on, you will download your games into D: specify D: when downloading. Do not take default, which is C:

Thereafter, running those games, will load from faster D: don't expect mega miracle speeds.

The problem am seeing is, 256 gig is very little space for today's games, u may find out, very very soon, you are out of space again. But I get the gist u just wanna play with SSD see what it does.
 
Jul 4, 2019
16
0
10
0
Assuming you currently have a single HD C: drive...

Just plug in the SSD and it should come up as D: automatically. Sometimes you have to partition and format it before D: comes up. Hope that's not too much detail for you.

From then on, you will download your games into D: specify D: when downloading. Do not take default, which is C:

Thereafter, running those games, will load from faster D: don't expect mega miracle speeds.

The problem am seeing is, 256 gig is very little space for today's games, u may find out, very very soon, you are out of space again. But I get the gist u just wanna play with SSD see what it does.
Don't worry, I have prepared. I don't have many games, and they are not too big either. I was just making sure I could use it for what I wanted. Thanks so much for the info tho!
 

popatim

Titan
Moderator
In Steam & Origin you can actually move games you've already installed to the SSD . First you need to create a Steam/Origin folders on the SSD (Make new folder...) and then add the new folder location to the library location in the Steam/Origin app.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS