Question Best BIOS settings on Z270 GAMING M3 motherboard ?

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
What Windows version are you running?

What are your FULL hardware specifications including exact model numbers for motherboard, CPU, memory kit, power supply, CPU cooler, case, number of case fans, exact location of case fans, which direction (in or out each case fan is blowing), graphics card and storage devices. Knowing the approximate age of each of them would be helpful as well.
 
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pumacs16

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What Windows version are you running?

What are your FULL hardware specifications including exact model numbers for motherboard, CPU, memory kit, power supply, CPU cooler, case, number of case fans, exact location of case fans, which direction (in or out each case fan is blowing), graphics card and storage devices. Knowing the approximate age of each of them would be helpful as well.
idk its age, maybe in 2017, all the parts were bought My windows: Windows 10 (22H2 OS Build. 19045. 2311)
HWINFO: https://easyupload.io/pvusur
CPU: Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-7400 CPU @ 3.00GHz
MOTHERBOARD: MSI Z270 GAMING M3 (MS-7A62)
RAM 1: KINGSTON KHX3000C15D4/8GX 8gb 3000mhz
RAM2: G.SKill F4-3000C16-8GISB 8gb 3000mhz
GPU: GIGABYTE GTX 1050 Ti OC 4GB (GV-N105TOC-4GD)
DRIVES: TOSHIBA DT01ACA050 | Serial number: 653DU9VGS & TOSHIBA DT01ACA100 | Serial number: 46I0XTRNS
POWER SUPPLY: CORSAIR VS650 CP-9020098-EU
HOUSE: NZXT

Video number of case fans, exact location of case fans, which direction (in or out each case fan is blowing), 4 fans + cpu fan
video: https://youtube.com/shorts/UuV9KKzogbE?feature=share
Photos HOUSE: https://postimg.cc/gallery/ftLDRbP
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Right off the bat I see two problems, but I can't see your HWinfo screenshots because that page says they are not available. Upload your HWinfo screenshot to imgur and then use THIS process for posting any future images here so that they will be visible directly in the thread.


For one thing, you have two completely different memory modules. Even having two IDENTICAL memory modules that did not come together in the same kit can be a problem, much less two that are completely different. This can cause a variety of problems such as nothing working at all, only one DIMM working, very poor memory timings due to motherboard having to set very loose timings in order to get the sticks to work together, half the memory not being recognized at all, and so on. I need to see the screenshots of the SPD tab and the Memory tab (Click on slot that is populated to populate specs in the fields to the right on this tab) to verify whether we have a working memory configuration or not.

For another thing, you have the memory in the wrong slots. For two DIMM installations they should be in the second and fourth slots, which are the A2 and B2 slots. Fourth slot is the one closest to the edge of the motherboard and second slot is two slots over from that. So I'd move them to the two slots they are not in now, and then go in and take your HWinfo screenshots of those tabs I listed, and then post them here.

Also, your VS series power supply is pretty terrible. Even Jon Gerow, who is the chief PSU engineer for Corsair and used to post here fairly frequently used to say how bad those units were. I would very seriously consider replacing it with a better quality unit. I can make recommendations based on your region and budget if and when you decide to do that. Do not let "brand" be a guide when looking for a quality power supply. Model is the key, as even the better known brands have both good and bad models.

As to the BIOS settings, I still need a little more information so please do this.

Click your start menu and in the run or search box type in diskmgmt.msc and then hit OK or click on the result to open disk management.

When open, drag the window larger so that it shows all the disks that are installed and take a screenshot of all the available drives and partitions. Then, right click on the C: (Windows) partition and select properties. Then in the window that pops up click the hardware tab. Find the drive that matches the drive you have Windows installed on and select it then below click the properties button. In the Window that pops up click the Volumes tab and then click the Populate button.

We need to know what it says next to Partition style. It will be either GUID Partition Table (GPT) or MBR. This will tell us if you have done a legacy or UEFI Windows installation which will tell us much about how the BIOS should be configured or whether it is advisable to reinstall Windows using a full UEFI configuration. MBR legacy installations are generally undesirable unless it is absolutely necessary, these days, especially if you are not running old hardware that is not UEFI compatible or an older OS like Windows 7.
 
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pumacs16

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Right off the bat I see two problems, but I can't see your HWinfo screenshots because that page says they are not available. Upload your HWinfo screenshot to imgur and then use THIS process for posting any future images here so that they will be visible directly in the thread.


For one thing, you have two completely different memory modules. Even having two IDENTICAL memory modules that did not come together in the same kit can be a problem, much less two that are completely different. This can cause a variety of problems such as nothing working at all, only one DIMM working, very poor memory timings due to motherboard having to set very loose timings in order to get the sticks to work together, half the memory not being recognized at all, and so on. I need to see the screenshots of the SPD tab and the Memory tab (Click on slot that is populated to populate specs in the fields to the right on this tab) to verify whether we have a working memory configuration or not.

For another thing, you have the memory in the wrong slots. For two DIMM installations they should be in the second and fourth slots, which are the A2 and B2 slots. Fourth slot is the one closest to the edge of the motherboard and second slot is two slots over from that. So I'd move them to the two slots they are not in now, and then go in and take your HWinfo screenshots of those tabs I listed, and then post them here.

Also, your VS series power supply is pretty terrible. Even Jon Gerow, who is the chief PSU engineer for Corsair and used to post here fairly frequently used to say how bad those units were. I would very seriously consider replacing it with a better quality unit. I can make recommendations based on your region and budget if and when you decide to do that. Do not let "brand" be a guide when looking for a quality power supply. Model is the key, as even the better known brands have both good and bad models.

As to the BIOS settings, I still need a little more information so please do this.

Click your start menu and in the run or search box type in diskmgmt.msc and then hit OK or click on the result to open disk management.

When open, drag the window larger so that it shows all the disks that are installed and take a screenshot of all the available drives and partitions. Then, right click on the C: (Windows) partition and select properties. Then in the window that pops up click the hardware tab. Find the drive that matches the drive you have Windows installed on and select it then below click the properties button. In the Window that pops up click the Volumes tab and then click the Populate button.

We need to know what it says next to Partition style. It will be either GUID Partition Table (GPT) or MBR. This will tell us if you have done a legacy or UEFI Windows installation which will tell us much about how the BIOS should be configured or whether it is advisable to reinstall Windows using a full UEFI configuration. MBR legacy installations are generally undesirable unless it is absolutely necessary, these days, especially if you are not running old hardware that is not UEFI compatible or an older OS like Windows 7.


HWINFO pdf formating: https://easyupload.io/dqx2z7
This is the only way I can solve it, it would take a long time to save the pictures one by one, or from which part?

So change ram slot
as in the photo?






DISK MANAGMENT
I don't know "Populate button' what you mean exactly, but I think that's what you want:











RAMS:
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
On the window that shows Toshiba DT01ACA050 at the top you then need to click on the Volumes tab, and THEN click on Populate.

On the memory, yes, those are the correct slots and yours are not in those slots currently based on the pictures you posted earlier.
 
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pumacs16

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On the window that shows Toshiba DT01ACA050 at the top you then need to click on the Volumes tab, and THEN click on Populate.

On the memory, yes, those are the correct slots and yours are not in those slots currently based on the pictures you posted earlier.
I transferred the memory as it is and now the LEDs work on the motherboard, (XMP) how to proceed?


 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Perfect, so the OS drive is already GPT, that makes life a little easier. These are what I'd recommend changing in the BIOS based on your screenshots. I would make one change at a time, then save settings, exit BIOS then go back into BIOS to make the next change. That way if any problems come up you will know exactly what caused it.

Windows 8.1/10 WHQL change to enabled. Windows 7 installation change to disabled.

Fast boot can be changed to enabled too but I'd wait until later down the road because enabling fast boot can make it a bit harder to get back into the BIOS so I usually like to wait until I'm sure all other changes are good before I worry about that. Do not enable MSI fast boot when you do, just fast boot.


Next screen, Boot mode select, UEFI only, not Legacy+UEFI.

Next screen, Extreme memory profile (XMP), change to enabled.

On the "Overclocking\CPU features screen", change EIST (Enhanced Intel Speed Step) to enabled.

That's pretty much it based on the screenshots you provided.


If after making ANY of these changes the system won't POST so that you can get back into the BIOS, then power off, flip the switch on the PSU to the off position, remove the CMOS battery from the motherboard to reset the BIOS settings, leave it out for a minute or two, then put it back, flip PSU switch back on and restart the system, then report back here with what setting you had problems after changing.
 
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pumacs16

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Perfect, so the OS drive is already GPT, that makes life a little easier. These are what I'd recommend changing in the BIOS based on your screenshots. I would make one change at a time, then save settings, exit BIOS then go back into BIOS to make the next change. That way if any problems come up you will know exactly what caused it.

Windows 8.1/10 WHQL change to enabled. Windows 7 installation change to disabled.

Fast boot can be changed to enabled too but I'd wait until later down the road because enabling fast boot can make it a bit harder to get back into the BIOS so I usually like to wait until I'm sure all other changes are good before I worry about that. Do not enable MSI fast boot when you do, just fast boot.


Next screen, Boot mode select, UEFI only, not Legacy+UEFI.

Next screen, Extreme memory profile (XMP), change to enabled.

On the "Overclocking\CPU features screen", change EIST (Enhanced Intel Speed Step) to enabled.

That's pretty much it based on the screenshots you provided.


If after making ANY of these changes the system won't POST so that you can get back into the BIOS, then power off, flip the switch on the PSU to the off position, remove the CMOS battery from the motherboard to reset the BIOS settings, leave it out for a minute or two, then put it back, flip PSU switch back on and restart the system, then report back here with what setting you had problems after changing.
Thank you,
My question is that there are still occasional freezes, why is that, and the game is not so smooth at several fps, I see that on a 144-hz monitor the game is very smooth even at +200 fps.

My problem is that if it is on, then set it to 200 fps, the picture is not smooth, but if I reduce it to 48 fps, which is the lowest in csgo, then back to 200 the game is smooth, but only For 5-10 seconds..
 
Last edited:

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
If there are any steps listed here that you have not already done, it would be advisable to do so if for no other reason than to be able to say you've already done it and eliminate that possibility.



First,

Make sure your motherboard has the MOST recent BIOS version installed. If it does not, then update. This solves a high number of issues even in cases where the release that is newer than yours makes no mention of improving graphics card or other hardware compatibility. They do not list every change they have made when they post a new BIOS release. In cases where you DO already have the latest BIOS version, simply resetting the BIOS as follows has a fairly high percentage chance of effecting a positive change in some cases so it is ALWAYS worth TRYING, at the very least.


BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, IF the problem is related to a lack of video signal, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.

Trying a different monitor as well, if possible, is also a good idea if there is a lack of display. It happens.


Second,

Go to the product page for your motherboard on the manufacturer website. Download and install the latest driver versions for the chipset, audio and network adapters. Do not skip installing a newer driver just because you think it is not relevant to the problem you are having. The drivers for one device can often affect ALL other devices and a questionable driver release can cause instability in the OS itself. They don't release new drivers just for fun. If there is a new driver release for a component, there is a good reason for it. The same goes for BIOS updates. When it comes to the chipset drivers, if your motherboard manufacturer lists a chipset driver that is newer than what the chipset developer (Intel or AMD, for our purposes) lists, then use that one. If Intel (Or AMD) shows a chipset driver version that is newer than what is available from the motherboard product page, then use that one. Always use the newest chipset driver that you can get and always use ONLY the chipset drivers available from either the motherboard manufacturer, AMD or Intel.


IF you have other hardware installed or attached to the system that are not a part of the systems covered by the motherboard drivers, then go to the support page for THAT component and check to see if there are newer drivers available for that as well. If there are, install them.


Third,

Make sure your memory is running at the correct advertised speed in the BIOS. This may require that you set the memory to run at the XMP profile settings. Also, make sure you have the memory installed in the correct slots and that they are running in dual channel which you can check by installing CPU-Z and checking the Memory and SPD tabs. For all modern motherboards that are dual channel memory architectures, from the last ten years at least, if you have two sticks installed they should be in the A2 (Called DDR4_1 on some boards) or B2 (Called DDR4_2 on some boards) which are ALWAYS the SECOND and FOURTH slots over from the CPU socket, counting TOWARDS the edge of the motherboard EXCEPT on boards that only have two memory slots total. In that case, if you have two modules it's not rocket science, but if you have only one, then install it in the A1 or DDR4_1 slot.



Fourth (And often tied for most important along with an up-to-date motherboard BIOS),

A clean install of the graphics card drivers. Regardless of whether you "already installed the newest drivers" for your graphics card or not, it is OFTEN a good idea to do a CLEAN install of the graphics card drivers. Just installing over the old drivers OR trying to use what Nvidia and AMD consider a clean install is not good enough and does not usually give the same result as using the Display Driver Uninstaller utility. This has a very high success rate and is always worth a shot.


If you have had both Nvidia and AMD cards installed at any point on that operating system then you will want to run the DDU twice. Once for the old card drivers (ie, Nvidia or AMD) and again for the currently installed graphics card drivers (ie, AMD or Nvidia). So if you had an Nvidia card at some point in the past, run it first for Nvidia and then after that is complete, run it again for AMD if you currently have an AMD card installed.



And last, but not least, if you have never done a CLEAN install of Windows, or have upgraded from an older version to Windows 10, or have been through several spring or fall major Windows updates, it might be a very good idea to consider doing a clean install of Windows if none of these other solutions has helped. IF you are using a Windows installation from a previous system and you didn't do a clean install of Windows after building the new system, then it's 99.99% likely that you NEED to do a CLEAN install before trying any other solutions.


How to do a CLEAN installation of Windows 10, the RIGHT way
 
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pumacs16

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Oct 31, 2017
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If there are any steps listed here that you have not already done, it would be advisable to do so if for no other reason than to be able to say you've already done it and eliminate that possibility.



First,

Make sure your motherboard has the MOST recent BIOS version installed. If it does not, then update. This solves a high number of issues even in cases where the release that is newer than yours makes no mention of improving graphics card or other hardware compatibility. They do not list every change they have made when they post a new BIOS release. In cases where you DO already have the latest BIOS version, simply resetting the BIOS as follows has a fairly high percentage chance of effecting a positive change in some cases so it is ALWAYS worth TRYING, at the very least.


BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, IF the problem is related to a lack of video signal, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.

Trying a different monitor as well, if possible, is also a good idea if there is a lack of display. It happens.


Second,

Go to the product page for your motherboard on the manufacturer website. Download and install the latest driver versions for the chipset, audio and network adapters. Do not skip installing a newer driver just because you think it is not relevant to the problem you are having. The drivers for one device can often affect ALL other devices and a questionable driver release can cause instability in the OS itself. They don't release new drivers just for fun. If there is a new driver release for a component, there is a good reason for it. The same goes for BIOS updates. When it comes to the chipset drivers, if your motherboard manufacturer lists a chipset driver that is newer than what the chipset developer (Intel or AMD, for our purposes) lists, then use that one. If Intel (Or AMD) shows a chipset driver version that is newer than what is available from the motherboard product page, then use that one. Always use the newest chipset driver that you can get and always use ONLY the chipset drivers available from either the motherboard manufacturer, AMD or Intel.


IF you have other hardware installed or attached to the system that are not a part of the systems covered by the motherboard drivers, then go to the support page for THAT component and check to see if there are newer drivers available for that as well. If there are, install them.


Third,

Make sure your memory is running at the correct advertised speed in the BIOS. This may require that you set the memory to run at the XMP profile settings. Also, make sure you have the memory installed in the correct slots and that they are running in dual channel which you can check by installing CPU-Z and checking the Memory and SPD tabs. For all modern motherboards that are dual channel memory architectures, from the last ten years at least, if you have two sticks installed they should be in the A2 (Called DDR4_1 on some boards) or B2 (Called DDR4_2 on some boards) which are ALWAYS the SECOND and FOURTH slots over from the CPU socket, counting TOWARDS the edge of the motherboard EXCEPT on boards that only have two memory slots total. In that case, if you have two modules it's not rocket science, but if you have only one, then install it in the A1 or DDR4_1 slot.



Fourth (And often tied for most important along with an up-to-date motherboard BIOS),

A clean install of the graphics card drivers. Regardless of whether you "already installed the newest drivers" for your graphics card or not, it is OFTEN a good idea to do a CLEAN install of the graphics card drivers. Just installing over the old drivers OR trying to use what Nvidia and AMD consider a clean install is not good enough and does not usually give the same result as using the Display Driver Uninstaller utility. This has a very high success rate and is always worth a shot.


If you have had both Nvidia and AMD cards installed at any point on that operating system then you will want to run the DDU twice. Once for the old card drivers (ie, Nvidia or AMD) and again for the currently installed graphics card drivers (ie, AMD or Nvidia). So if you had an Nvidia card at some point in the past, run it first for Nvidia and then after that is complete, run it again for AMD if you currently have an AMD card installed.


Graphics card driver CLEAN install guide using the Wagnard tools DDU



And last, but not least, if you have never done a CLEAN install of Windows, or have upgraded from an older version to Windows 10, or have been through several spring or fall major Windows updates, it might be a very good idea to consider doing a clean install of Windows if none of these other solutions has helped. IF you are using a Windows installation from a previous system and you didn't do a clean install of Windows after building the new system, then it's 99.99% likely that you NEED to do a CLEAN install before trying any other solutions.


How to do a CLEAN installation of Windows 10, the RIGHT way
not help :(
 

pumacs16

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Please explain what you mean by "not smooth", because that could mean ten different things for ten different people.
Okay, so it seems that I see less fps on the 165hz monitor, but yesterday I looked at and tested a program called Process Lasso, and I did the following steps for that program:
I/O Priority -> Always -> High,
Memory Priority -> Always -> High and the game is much faster +10%, but it didn't fix it completely (which is adjusted to 165hz, the problem is this, I really can't tell, this needs to be seen.
And I see this because I used to have a 144hz monitor first, I turned it on and played an fps game, the gameplay was very fast, I had no input lag, the game was much smoother. And then it disappeared after a few minutes, I thought it was the monitor's fault... that's why I bought this new monitor, but nothing changed...
and I could shoot such. and maybe is ram
problem because not change pc speed 8gb ram -> 16 gb -24 gb ram???
Video:
 
Last edited:

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Do this, for both our sakes.

Download HWinfo. Install it. Run it, and choose "sensors only". Make sure "Summary" is not checked. Expand the HWinfo window so it reaches from the top to the bottom of your display and is wide enough to see all of the relevant sensor data. Take screenshots, with it at idle. It will probably require taking several screenshots and scrolling down in between screenshots to capture all of the sensors.

Then, take a second set of screenshots with HWinfo open but this time run your game or some other form of high intensity benchmark or stress test. Run it for a minute or two before you start taking the screenshots so things can get warmed up a bit.

Post the screenshots here. Probably there will be something like 6-8 screenshots.
 
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pumacs16

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Oct 31, 2017
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Do this, for both our sakes.

Download HWinfo. Install it. Run it, and choose "sensors only". Make sure "Summary" is not checked. Expand the HWinfo window so it reaches from the top to the bottom of your display and is wide enough to see all of the relevant sensor data. Take screenshots, with it at idle. It will probably require taking several screenshots and scrolling down in between screenshots to capture all of the sensors.

Then, take a second set of screenshots with HWinfo open but this time run your game or some other form of high intensity benchmark or stress test. Run it for a minute or two before you start taking the screenshots so things can get warmed up a bit.

Post the screenshots here. Probably there will be something like 6-8 screenshots.
Okey bro :)
Thank you very much for your help, I am very grateful that you are so helpful and so professional :)
I am attaching the photos


NOT GAME:











INGAME:




 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Well, for one thing it doesn't look like your memory is running at the correct speed. Let's verify that because you only posted screenshots of the SPD tab in CPU-Z previously. Take a screenshot of the memory tab in CPU-Z and post that here.

Also, your power supply, which I mentioned before as being very low quality, needs to be replaced. If you look at the +12v system voltage in your "gaming" screenshots, you'll see the voltage has dropped to 11.7v in the "min" column. That is discard result. 11.7v or less means the unit is not capable of sustaining correct 12v voltage and should be replaced.
 
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pumacs16

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Oct 31, 2017
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Well, for one thing it doesn't look like your memory is running at the correct speed. Let's verify that because you only posted screenshots of the SPD tab in CPU-Z previously. Take a screenshot of the memory tab in CPU-Z and post that here.

Also, your power supply, which I mentioned before as being very low quality, needs to be replaced. If you look at the +12v system voltage in your "gaming" screenshots, you'll see the voltage has dropped to 11.7v in the "min" column. That is discard result. 11.7v or less means the unit is not capable of sustaining correct 12v voltage and should be replaced.
OK, what do you recommend, which is the cheapest and good power supply?

 

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