[SOLVED] Best CPU choice to upgrade while retaining my existing GTX 750Ti

TDsouza007

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Please keep your upgrade discussion to 1 thread
I had an older machine that I gave away. I have however retained my HDD and graphics card which is a GTX 750Ti.

My older rig was as follows
Motherboard: Asus H81M-CS
Processor: i5-4440 3.1Ghz
Ram: Kingston hyperx fb-dimm 4GB DDR3
SSD: Kingston SSDNow 300 (128GB)
HDD: WD 1TB
Graphics Card: GTX 750Ti
PSU: Cooler Master MWE Bronze V2 450

The exact model of my graphics card is as below
https://www.amazon.in/dp/B00I5ZYI5A/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_glt_fabc_XVB9SC0C70M1E6XHAKAZ?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1

I'm not sure if a graphics card that old would bottleneck a newer processor, or if I still have some room to upgrade.

I personally like the i5 10600k but am not sure if it makes sense to take this route.

Is there any scope of still using the graphics card on a newer system today.

I'm not planning on over clocking or heavy gaming.
 

geofelt

Titan
What is your budget?
I like the GTX750ti.
It will work perfectly well on any motherboard.
I have a EVGA version that runs a 4k monitor at 60hz.
On gaming, it will be the graphics card that is the limiter for most games.
Whenever graphics cards become reasonably priced again, you can always upgrade.

On the processor, I would look at 11th gen intel.
I5-11400 is quite comparable in performance to the i5-10600K.
The prices are similar.
But, the 11400 will be perfectly happy with a B560 based motherboard that will usually cost less than a Z590 based motherboard which has the ability to overclock.
Here is a review of the 11400:
As a plus, the 11400 includes a stock cooler which the 10600k does not.

Two other suggestions:
Plan on a SSD; any kind of a ssd. pcie m.2 devices show impressive sequential benchmarks, but the real benefit is in random I/O and all ssd devices perform similarly there. They are some 40x better than a HDD.
The m.2 format plugs into a motherboard slot without the need for sata power and data cables.

Buy a quality psu with a 7 to 10 year warranty.
Here is a handy chart as to the wattage:
http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page362.htm
While 450w will do, I suggest buying something in the 550-750w range to accommodate a future graphics upgrade.
A PSU will only use the wattage demanded of it, regardless of it's max capability.
 

Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
You might want to understand that any processor you pair with that GPU past the 6th gen is still more than what the GTX750Ti will need. You're looking at a GPU upgrade sooner than later.

I'm not planning on over clocking or heavy gaming.
What do you want to tax the system with?

I'm more concerned about the PSU in your build considering it looks like it's as old as the processor in your prior build.
 

TDsouza007

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You might want to understand that any processor you pair with that GPU past the 6th gen is still more than what the GTX750Ti will need. You're looking at a GPU upgrade sooner than later.
Does this mean I could still proceed for the time being and later upgrade the graphics card too?

I'm not planning on over clocking or heavy gaming.
What do you want to tax the system with?
I mostly use it for web development and graphic design. However, wanna keep some room incase I wanna experiment with other disciplines too. For example, I might wanna learn AI/ML and use the machine to practice some of the basics. Likewise I might wanna do some light video editing.

I'm more concerned about the PSU in your build considering it looks like it's as old as the processor in your prior build.
I'm yet to decide on the PSU. Will do that once I finalize the other specs. As I mentioned the only parts I've retained are the GPU and the HDD. Wanna just see if the GPU is worth moving ahead with as I won't be gaming a lot.
 
Does this mean I could still proceed for the time being and later upgrade the graphics card too?



I mostly use it for web development and graphic design. However, wanna keep some room incase I wanna experiment with other disciplines too. For example, I might wanna learn AI/ML and use the machine to practice some of the basics. Likewise I might wanna do some light video editing.



I'm yet to decide on the PSU. Will do that once I finalize the other specs. As I mentioned the only parts I've retained are the GPU and the HDD. Wanna just see if the GPU is worth moving ahead with as I won't be gaming a lot.
The 750 will be a big step up from any igp.
As to whether it will have enough muscle to do what you want you won't know that until you try it.
I suspect it will run most anything perhaps not as quickly as you want.
 

geofelt

Titan
What is your budget?
I like the GTX750ti.
It will work perfectly well on any motherboard.
I have a EVGA version that runs a 4k monitor at 60hz.
On gaming, it will be the graphics card that is the limiter for most games.
Whenever graphics cards become reasonably priced again, you can always upgrade.

On the processor, I would look at 11th gen intel.
I5-11400 is quite comparable in performance to the i5-10600K.
The prices are similar.
But, the 11400 will be perfectly happy with a B560 based motherboard that will usually cost less than a Z590 based motherboard which has the ability to overclock.
Here is a review of the 11400:
As a plus, the 11400 includes a stock cooler which the 10600k does not.

Two other suggestions:
Plan on a SSD; any kind of a ssd. pcie m.2 devices show impressive sequential benchmarks, but the real benefit is in random I/O and all ssd devices perform similarly there. They are some 40x better than a HDD.
The m.2 format plugs into a motherboard slot without the need for sata power and data cables.

Buy a quality psu with a 7 to 10 year warranty.
Here is a handy chart as to the wattage:
http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page362.htm
While 450w will do, I suggest buying something in the 550-750w range to accommodate a future graphics upgrade.
A PSU will only use the wattage demanded of it, regardless of it's max capability.
 

TDsouza007

Reputable
Aug 5, 2017
42
1
4,545
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What is your budget?
I like the GTX750ti.
It will work perfectly well on any motherboard.
I have a EVGA version that runs a 4k monitor at 60hz.
On gaming, it will be the graphics card that is the limiter for most games.
Whenever graphics cards become reasonably priced again, you can always upgrade.

On the processor, I would look at 11th gen intel.
I5-11400 is quite comparable in performance to the i5-10600K.
The prices are similar.
But, the 11400 will be perfectly happy with a B560 based motherboard that will usually cost less than a Z590 based motherboard which has the ability to overclock.
Here is a review of the 11400:
As a plus, the 11400 includes a stock cooler which the 10600k does not.

Two other suggestions:
Plan on a SSD; any kind of a ssd. pcie m.2 devices show impressive sequential benchmarks, but the real benefit is in random I/O and all ssd devices perform similarly there. They are some 40x better than a HDD.
The m.2 format plugs into a motherboard slot without the need for sata power and data cables.

Buy a quality psu with a 7 to 10 year warranty.
Here is a handy chart as to the wattage:
http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page362.htm
While 450w will do, I suggest buying something in the 550-750w range to accommodate a future graphics upgrade.
A PSU will only use the wattage demanded of it, regardless of it's max capability.
Yes' I'm planning on an SSD along with about 500W of PSU.

I'm a little confused about the processor though. Given I'm not planning on overclocking does it still make sense to go for the 11400.

Basically, I've always thought that the base frequency is a large contributor to PSU performance. Given both have 6 cores and 12 threads, the one with the higher base frequency should win. However, reading the URL you shared, I seem to be wrong, just wondering how.
 

geofelt

Titan
A power supply needs to supply power mostly at 12v.
A graphics card like a GTX750i is powered entirely by the pcie slot which has a max capability of 75w.
Some very strong graphics cards may need aux psu power from a 6 pin connector which is 75w, or a 8 pin connector which is 150w.
Some ultra strong graphics cards can use two 8 pin connectors or even more so that becomes the most important need for a psu. All that makes the graphics card the more important determinant of the power needed.

On the cpu side, a processor like the 11400 will have a thermal design power of 65w.
That is what is needed to run the cpu at default specs.
Other things like hard drives, ssd devices or fans are in the range of 10w.
Not a significant contribution to power needs.

On overclockable processors like the I5-10600K, the TDP is 125w.
Plus, if you overclock, added power is needed to increase the voltage to get higher overclocked speeds.
The power needed from overclocking could easily double.

Since you are not planning on overclocking, that makes the 11400 an even better choice.

While not universally true, it is my observation that power supplies with wattages ending in 00 are more likely to be older or cheaper units.
A cheap PSU will be made of substandard components. It will not have safety and overload protections.
The danger is if it fails under load, it can destroy anything it is connected to.
It will deliver advertised power only at room temperatures, not at higher temperatures found when installed in a case.
The wattage will be delivered on the 3 and 5v rails, not on the 12v rails where modern parts
like the CPU and Graphics cards need it. What power is delivered may fluctuate and cause instability
issues that are hard to diagnose.
The fan will need to spin up higher to cool it, making it noisy.
A cheap PSU can become very expensive.

Do not buy one.

There are several psu quality tier lists for guidance.
Here are two:
 

animekenji

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Dec 31, 2010
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It's hard to even recommend the expense of buying a i7 4770 with that video card. I tried to do some benchmarking with my 1050 Ti in a i7 6700 machine, and it was really bottlenecked. The 6700 and 4770, in real world terms, perform very close to each other, so the 750 Ti would be bottlenecking even that. If you're going to be moving to a faster CPU, you're going to want a faster GPU to go with it.
 

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