Question Best CPU for the long haul?

Jan 14, 2022
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Please don't spam the forum, keep it to 1 thread.
(Disclaimer: I'm not a professional when it comes to computers, I've just picked up nuggets of information through the years, so just please bear with me:sweatsmile: )

So I know any computer is not really future proof, but I hope to build a computer that will last me at least a good 8-10 years. The stuff I do on my current computer probably isn't considered to be heavy workloads per say(Mostly web surfing, some gaming[rarely], occasional Adobe Photoshop/Premiere/Audition usage, etc), but my current computer is starting to show it's age, such as occasional crashing, freezing, slowing down, etc. It's about 10 years old now and though I have upgraded a few things through the years, I think it's getting closer to moving on from it.

Its specs include:
CPU: i7-3770
GPU: RX580
Hard Drive: 1TB SSD/1 TB HDD
PSU: EVGA 600watts
RAM: 16GB.

My main question is, what would be the best processor to go with? AMD or Intel?
I was looking at the Ryzen 7 5800x, but considering that the AM4 platform is about to be replaced by the AM5, and that support for DDR5 and PCIe 5.0 is right around the corner for AMD, I wasn't sure upon jumping the gun on the 5800x just yet. Another thing I thought about is that if I do wait for a CPU that uses the AM5 socket, I could probably upgrade the CPU down the road and keep the same motherboard, since AMD uses the same socket for years.
I was also looking at the Intel lineup, such as the i7-12700k, which supports DDR5 and PCIe 5.0, but the cost for DDR5 right now is horrible. Another thing about Intel though, is that they seem to change sockets more frequently, so less room for CPU upgrades using the same socket.
So what would ya'll recommend? Also my budget would probably be around $1200-1300, and I would probably use my old RX580 in my new build, but give the rest of my old computer to a family member to use.

Thanks!!!
(Edit: I would also like to add that I'm not against buying a pre-built computer, but I really prefer to build my own. Never done a build myself and looking forward to doing so on my next desktop computer)
 
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Co BIY

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Jun 18, 2015
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Why_Me makes a very solid suggestion with the 12400 on a solid B660 board with DDR4.

Hitting the bang-for-your buck sweet spot is a better strategy then going high-end and keeping longer. Especially when your requirements are actually quite low.

Not sure a cooler is even needed as the Intel stock cooler is getting good reviews.

Personally I would pay the extra for the IGP since we are still in a restricted market for GPUs especially for your use case of light use and an older GPU.
 
Jan 14, 2022
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Thanks for suggestions ya'll! I appreciate it! Yeah I know I should probably just aim for a little lower spec build due to my needs, save money, and upgrade sooner down the road, which I may end up doing, but I have a tendency to sometimes go over board on things, spend more than I should, get higher priced stuffed(even though I don't really need it😅), and run things into the ground to the point that I pretty much have to get something new.
Is there a therapy on here to help with that? 😄 jk
 
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Co BIY

Honorable
Jun 18, 2015
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I have a tendency to sometimes go over board on things, spend more than I should, get higher priced stuffed(even though I don't really need it😅), and run things into the ground to the point that I pretty much have to get something new.

Is there a therapy on here to help with that? 😄 jk
Done that plenty of times myself. And not just too much money but too much time invested for a tiny bit of possible theoretical performance or reliability. With cars, with computers, ...

If you figure out the right therapy let me know.

I think they say recognizing you have a problem is the first step ...
 
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