Best Gaming Microphones for 2019

nobspls

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Mar 14, 2018
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Is there a mic that has activation threshold setting to make up for the fact that games that Overwatch has retarded voice system that can not fiqure out that not all sounds needs to be sent all the time, and only when I speak loudly.
 

daglesj

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Jul 14, 2007
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Your'e confusing resolution with range.
Still pointless as most people using high bitrate will still want to be using the wider freqs associated with that.

Only to have it played through laptop speakers or a $20 Trust PC speaker system.

Stick to Redbook audio folks!
 

mm0zct

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Aug 13, 2009
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Is there a mic that has activation threshold setting to make up for the fact that games that Overwatch has retarded voice system that can not fiqure out that not all sounds needs to be sent all the time, and only when I speak loudly.
If you run your mic through "voice meter", you can dial in a "audibility" setting which does this, it fades out the mic when it's quiet, and won't register sound until a threshold is crossed. I recommend voice meter just for adjusting the mic gain anyway, but this is an extra handy feature.

I have the beyerdynamic fox, and even with the high gain setting it's quite quiet for me sitting on my desk, so I run it through voice meter to boost the gain. Because it's a studio quality mic there's no extra electronic/amplifier noise picked up from this, the mic just has a lot of headroom that I'm not using, especially in conference calls.
 

nobspls

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Mar 14, 2018
902
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If you run your mic through "voice meter", you can dial in a "audibility" setting which does this, it fades out the mic when it's quiet, and won't register sound until a threshold is crossed. I recommend voice meter just for adjusting the mic gain anyway, but this is an extra handy feature.

I have the beyerdynamic fox, and even with the high gain setting it's quite quiet for me sitting on my desk, so I run it through voice meter to boost the gain. Because it's a studio quality mic there's no extra electronic/amplifier noise picked up from this, the mic just has a lot of headroom that I'm not using, especially in conference calls.
What exactly is this "voice meter"? Is this a piece of hardware or additional software? Thanks for pointing this out.
 

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