Question Best router to buy for the Virgin Sperhub 3 in modem mode?

rouchie

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Hi, I am fed up with the intermittent service I get th from the Virgin Superhub and am loooking at getting a router and putting the hub in modem mode. I have heard that the ASUS RT-AC86U Wi-Fi AC2900 would improve coverage and prevent the frequent drops we have endured for far too long? I have seen it on Amazon at £134.99. We live in a sem idetached 3 bed with Brick outside walls and plasterboard internal walls and connect with phones, tablets, TVs, PCs and laptops so I would hazard a gues at 12 - 20 devices overall, one on an ethernet cable and the rest via wifi
 

RealBeast

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Hi, I am fed up with the intermittent service I get th from the Virgin Superhub and am loooking at getting a router and putting the hub in modem mode. I have heard that the ASUS RT-AC86U Wi-Fi AC2900 would improve coverage and prevent the frequent drops we have endured for far too long? I have seen it on Amazon at £134.99. We live in a sem idetached 3 bed with Brick outside walls and plasterboard internal walls and connect with phones, tablets, TVs, PCs and laptops so I would hazard a gues at 12 - 20 devices overall, one on an ethernet cable and the rest via wifi
While that is a very good router, with only one wired device you may need more wireless bandwidth if you do any gaming or streaming video. Depending on the layout of your home, I would consider adding the new router as an access point and still using the 2.4GHz and 5GHz radios from the Super Hub. If the house if close to square the two can be just a few meters apart but if it is a long rectangle, better to place them farther apart with the AP at the opposite end.

You will need to assign non-overlapping 2.4GHz channels to the Superhub and AC86U. I would also give them different SSIDs and assign users or devices to split up the use.

Consumer quality routers cannot really handle 15-20 devices if each is using much bandwidth, despite marketing claims to the contrary. Some of the new very expensive routers have multiple 2.4 and 5GHz radios, but just adding one new AP will probably suffice.
 

rouchie

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Apr 26, 2012
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While that is a very good router, with only one wired device you may need more wireless bandwidth if you do any gaming or streaming video. Depending on the layout of your home, I would consider adding the new router as an access point and still using the 2.4GHz and 5GHz radios from the Super Hub. If the house if close to square the two can be just a few meters apart but if it is a long rectangle, better to place them farther apart with the AP at the opposite end.

You will need to assign non-overlapping 2.4GHz channels to the Superhub and AC86U. I would also give them different SSIDs and assign users or devices to split up the use.

Consumer quality routers cannot really handle 15-20 devices if each is using much bandwidth, despite marketing claims to the contrary. Some of the new very expensive routers have multiple 2.4 and 5GHz radios, but just adding one new AP will probably suffice.

Hi, Thanks for your response, and it is certainly the wireless coverage I am trying to improve. Just to be clear we probably have that many connectable devices between us but usually only 2 or 3 will in use at any one time as there is now just me an my wife at home most of the time. I game but don't stream
 
When you are getting wireless drops it means the signal level is too low. Replacing the router with a different router in general does not increase the signal level. The problem generally is the walls absorb the signals and you have neighbors with strong signals interfering. Since almost all router put out near the maximum allowed radio power it does not change how much signal the walls absorb or increase the level so it can in effect overpower the neighbors

In addition lets say you purchased one of those illegal routers directly from china that exceeds the maximum allowed power output. The signal may now get to the end device but since the end device still has a lower power transmitter the signal going back will still be absorbed by the walls.

In many case wifi coverage issues are end device issues. Many of these devices use lower power transmitters and small antenna because portability and battery life are more important than performance.

The only true solution to get better wifi coverage is to add more wifi transmitters. You would need to run a wire to the remote room and put in a wifi radio...ie a AP or router running as a AP. Best is to use ethernet wires but if you do not have it you can consider MoCA if you have tv coax or powerline networks that use the electrical wires.
 

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