[SOLVED] Best/Safest Material to Cover Glass on PC

MeganElisabeth

Commendable
Nov 13, 2016
23
0
1,510
0
I’m wanting to just somehow cover the glass pane I have when the PC is on and in use. Is it still possible for static to somehow damage/affect the components even if just taped to the glass? Also, what would be best to place under the case as it’s sitting on thin carpet? I have the Enthoo Luxe Full ATX with PSU on the bottom so I’ve read this is not good for static. Thank you very much in advance for any help. Don’t want to damage my not cheap first custom build.
 

Math Geek

Champion
Herald
considering your psu is on the bottom, the biggest concern you have is how much dust and lint is getting sucked into the psu and the pc case in general. that's a much bigger reason to get it off the floor or at least have it sitting on something off the carpet a little bit.
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
The metal in the case, connected to the ground wire in the power cable, grounds the whole PC. The components are tied to the ground by the ground connectors from the power supply. You have no concerns about static and your components inside your case.
 

MeganElisabeth

Commendable
Nov 13, 2016
23
0
1,510
0
The metal in the case, connected to the ground wire in the power cable, grounds the whole PC. The components are tied to the ground by the ground connectors from the power supply. You have no concerns about static and your components inside your case.
Well that sure is great to hear! I wonder why so much information I’m finding seems to indicate being on carpet specifically and any fabric covering the glass will lead to static and damaging components?
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
Well that sure is great to hear! I wonder why so much information I’m finding seems to indicate being on carpet specifically and any fabric covering the glass will lead to static and damaging components?
Maybe those are articles about BUILDING. Once assembled, static should not be an issue. If you live in a dry climate, a static wrist strap is a good investment. Wear it while building with a proper ground source.
 

jankerson

Illustrious
BANNED
Well that sure is great to hear! I wonder why so much information I’m finding seems to indicate being on carpet specifically and any fabric covering the glass will lead to static and damaging components?

Sounds like building articles, and MOST of those go WAY overboard about static. Almost all of them don't have a clue what they are talking about in reality.

In the end there is really nothing for you to worry about, just touch the PSU or the case (Something metal) before working on the PC.

I have never owned or used any of those anti-static wrist bands or other things they try and sell.

Built hundreds of PC's over the past 20+ years and never had an issue.
 
Last edited:

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
Sounds like building articles, and MOST of those go WAY overboard about static. Almost all of them don't have a clue what they are talking about in reality.

In the end there is really nothing for you to worry about, just touch the PSU or the case (Something metal) before working on the PC.

I have never owned or used any of those anti-static wrist bands or other things they try and sell.

Built hundreds of PC's over the past 20+ years and never had an issue.
That is anecdotally all true. A $5 wrist strap the ensures you have a continuous ground is not a bad thing. As I said, is especially necessary in winter or dry climates. Can you successfully assemble a PC without one? Sure. But wearing one is a best practice. Does EVERYONE in a motherboard manufacturing line wear one? Absolutely. It is a personal choice, just like buying car insurance greater than the govt mandate. Can you legally drive with the bare minimum? Sure. Is is a best practice? No.
 

jankerson

Illustrious
BANNED
That is anecdotally all true. A $5 wrist strap the ensures you have a continuous ground is not a bad thing. As I said, is especially necessary in winter or dry climates. Can you successfully assemble a PC without one? Sure. But wearing one is a best practice. Does EVERYONE in a motherboard manufacturing line wear one? Absolutely. It is a personal choice, just like buying car insurance greater than the govt mandate. Can you legally drive with the bare minimum? Sure. Is is a best practice? No.

That's in a factory, they also wear scrubs and eye protection and it's in a clean room type environment.

Big difference in that and what they are doing and spending 15 mins putting together a PC.
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
That's in a factory, they also wear scrubs and eye protection and it's in a clean room type environment.
And technically those are also best practices. Do you, as a home builder need to do that? No. Will it harm anything? Also no.

I work for an aerospace firm. I get to take ESD training annually. Does it seem unnecessary? Sometimes. But it also doesn't have ANY negative effects.
 
Reactions: aldan

jankerson

Illustrious
BANNED
And technically those are also best practices. Do you, as a home builder need to do that? No. Will it harm anything? Also no.

I work for an aerospace firm. I get to take ESD training annually. Does it seem unnecessary? Sometimes. But it also doesn't have ANY negative effects.
Working in factory conditions and comparing it to home and or small shop environment is comparing apples and oranges.

The point is really MOST of those reviewers and or article writers go way overboard on just about everything except the important things they need to be talking about. Like using quality parts in the 1st place.

Especially since everything comes in anti-static bags.
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
Working in factory conditions and comparing it to home and or small shop environment is comparing apples and oranges.

The point is really MOST of those reviewers and or article writers go way overboard on just about everything except the important things they need to be talking about. Like using quality parts in the 1st place.
Again. The term is "best practices" for a reason. I am obviously not advocating an ionizer or a wrist strap tester that are used in production facilities. I do advocate a wrist strap because it is $5 insurance with NO NEGATIVE effects. You obviously disagree with that recommendation.
 

jankerson

Illustrious
BANNED
Again. The term is "best practices" for a reason. I am obviously not advocating an ionizer or a wrist strap tester that are used in production facilities. I do advocate a wrist strap because it is $5 insurance with NO NEGATIVE effects. You obviously disagree with that recommendation.
Not disagreeing, just saying they aren't needed.

25 to 30 years ago we never used them at all, and only in the time of YT etc did they become a thing.

With today's components there is less danger of static damage than ever before.

Years ago when they might have been actually needed we didn't have them or even heard of them.

Today, we really don't need them and they are everywhere.

It's backwards.
 
Last edited:

jankerson

Illustrious
BANNED
People need to be more worried about buying quality parts (PSU's) that won't cook their PC's.

Something that there is a real danger of happening rather than static damage.

As usual people focus on the wrong things, it's always been that way however.
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
Not disagreeing, just saying they aren't needed.

25 to 30 years ago we never used them at all, and only in the time of YT etc did they become a thing.

With today's components there is less danger of static damage than ever before.

Years ago when they might have been actually needed we didn't have them or even heard of them.

Today, we really don't need them and they are everywhere.

It's backwards.
20 or 30 years ago, typical voltages for ICs were 5VDC. Now they are 1.2 or less than 1VDC. Circuit traces were 100s of microns Now they are under 20. Those conditions mean that the devices ARE more sensitive to static damage. CPUs still come packaged with conductive foam on the pins. For both physical protection and ESD protection. CPUs are going to be the most vulnerable install. There is very little to touch without accidentally touching signal pins. Motherboards, GPUs disk drives, all have large ground planes or metal pieces to handle. It is fairly trivial to not touch signal traces on a motherboard or GPU. That is what makes those devices such that you "don't need" ESD protection, not because the hardware is less vulnerable.
 

jankerson

Illustrious
BANNED
20 or 30 years ago, typical voltages for ICs were 5VDC. Now they are 1.2 or less than 1VDC. Circuit traces were 100s of microns Now they are under 20. Those conditions mean that the devices ARE more sensitive to static damage. CPUs still come packaged with conductive foam on the pins. For both physical protection and ESD protection. CPUs are going to be the most vulnerable install. There is very little to touch without accidentally touching signal pins. Motherboards, GPUs disk drives, all have large ground planes or metal pieces to handle. It is fairly trivial to not touch signal traces on a motherboard or GPU. That is what makes those devices such that you "don't need" ESD protection, not because the hardware is less vulnerable.
Intel CPU's don't have pins and haven't had them for a very long time now, just saying.

The overall quality of the components is much higher today and have static protection built in (Motherboards).
 

MeganElisabeth

Commendable
Nov 13, 2016
23
0
1,510
0
Maybe those are articles about BUILDING. Once assembled, static should not be an issue. If you live in a dry climate, a static wrist strap is a good investment. Wear it while building with a proper ground source.
Thank you so very much. The articles were about when they were turned on and in use. (Although I saw the ones regarding building as well). I’ll try my best to not be paranoid now that you’ve said it’s okay and seem to be pretty knowledgeable. The posts I read were saying a PC on carpet while on and in use could damage components through static by when we simply touch the power button. Also explained that’s why most offices have those mats for chairs if the PC is on carpet because of us being connected to the carpet and generating static. Also didn’t know if this would apply to other materials surrounding a carpeted area with PC such as construction paper and tape I think I’ve talked myself into going with. It was also explained that the PSU If intaking from the bottom and had carpet directly there wouln’t vent properly and overheat and could then damage the components? Maybe that’s where that comes from with damaging and not static? So just so I’m understanding, the PC isn’t grounded when building because it’s not connected to power and not grounded through that. However, when on and in use the PSU will ground all of the components so as to not allow static to get through? When touching things in/on the case I thought It was best to turn off PSU and unplug so I should be leaving it on and plugged in to stay grounded? I thank you so very much for your time as I’m just not wanting to lessen the lifespan of my components through static.

Here are a couple of the posts:

https://www.quora.com/Is-it-OK-if-you-put-a-PC-tower-on-carpet-I-just-bought-a-gaming-PC-and-it-looks-like-there-is-vents-in-the-top

 
Last edited:

MeganElisabeth

Commendable
Nov 13, 2016
23
0
1,510
0
Sounds like building articles, and MOST of those go WAY overboard about static. Almost all of them don't have a clue what they are talking about in reality.

In the end there is really nothing for you to worry about, just touch the PSU or the case (Something metal) before working on the PC.

I have never owned or used any of those anti-static wrist bands or other things they try and sell.

Built hundreds of PC's over the past 20+ years and never had an issue.
I saw many of those too but no these were about the PC when in use. Thank you very much for this informative response!
 

Math Geek

Champion
Herald
considering your psu is on the bottom, the biggest concern you have is how much dust and lint is getting sucked into the psu and the pc case in general. that's a much bigger reason to get it off the floor or at least have it sitting on something off the carpet a little bit.
 

MeganElisabeth

Commendable
Nov 13, 2016
23
0
1,510
0
considering your psu is on the bottom, the biggest concern you have is how much dust and lint is getting sucked into the psu and the pc case in general. that's a much bigger reason to get it off the floor or at least have it sitting on something off the carpet a little bit.
Thank you very much! That’s definitely my plan. Am planning on putting black construction paper with tape on the outside of the glass panel and am just trying not to be paranoid about it somehow damaging components with static or something.

Quick question, when applying the construction paper should I turn off PSU or unplug it too? I want to make sure it’s grounded when I’m touching the metal of the case while applying.
 

Math Geek

Champion
Herald
i'm not 100% sure about what you are planning. you want to cover the glass to accomplish what? are there vent holes in this glass or other air flow on it? if so you'll not want to cover that.

guess i need to understand what you're trying to accomplish to see what material/method would work easiest/best
 

MeganElisabeth

Commendable
Nov 13, 2016
23
0
1,510
0
i'm not 100% sure about what you are planning. you want to cover the glass to accomplish what? are there vent holes in this glass or other air flow on it? if so you'll not want to cover that.

guess i need to understand what you're trying to accomplish to see what material/method would work easiest/best
No, just the side glass panel with no vents or holes. I’m needing to cover lights that I cannot remove nor modify.
 

jankerson

Illustrious
BANNED
Thank you very much! That’s definitely my plan. Am planning on putting black construction paper with tape on the outside of the glass panel and am just trying not to be paranoid about it somehow damaging components with static or something.

Quick question, when applying the construction paper should I turn off PSU or unplug it too? I want to make sure it’s grounded when I’m touching the metal of the case while applying.

Actually you can just take the side off the case and put on the paper then put the side back on.

Or tape it on with it intact.

Just turn off the PC, no need to unplug it.

You should be able to turn off the LED's in either the bios or with the MB software so you won't have to cover it.
 

MeganElisabeth

Commendable
Nov 13, 2016
23
0
1,510
0
Actually you can just take the side off the case and put on the paper then put the side back on.

Or tape it on with it intact.

Just turn off the PC, no need to unplug it.

You should be able to turn off the LED's in either the bios or with the MB software so you won't have to cover it.
Good point thank you! Only turn off the PC or safest PSU off too? I wish. I had someone build this awhile back and cannot track down the cable in the jungle of cables hooked up to an LED Fan and don’t feel safe messing around trying to unplug to find it. It’s not directly into the mobo because I can’t control it through bios and not PSU by Molex either. So it must be some splitter or something. Paper should be completely safe though just on the glass right?
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS