Best Use For Low Latency On Wireless AC

revolultrablue

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I am a gamer and would like to lower the latency as much as possible wirelessly throwing throughput out the window. My question basically boils down to this. Which of these settings would be best for gaming and lower latency.

20mhz vs 40mhz

beamforming vs non beamforming

Assuming I am close to the router.
 

vmfantom

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There's no difference in latency, since the electromechanical wave velocity is the same. That's just the laws of physics. (If you really want to split hairs, more wavelengths of a slightly higher 5 GHz frequency can be received in a given interval than a slightly lower one.)

In terms of transmit power, VHT40 and non-beamforming would be somewhat higher. For example, the Asus RT-AC88U tests at 29.95 dBm at VHT40 without TxBF, and at 26.46 dBm at VHT20 with TxBF. So your modulation and throughput might stay higher over the same distance with 40 MHz and no beamforming.
 

revolultrablue

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lol i have the ac88u. Currently I'm running 40mhz with beamforming. I'm only slightly tech savy. Are you saying that I may have better latency with beamingforming off? I currently have airtime fairness on as well.

And when you say higher frequency you mean have it on a higher channel which equals higher frequency right? Or is it vice versa? I have it on channel 44 now.

so channel 44/40 mhz/ beamforming enabled.
 

vmfantom

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Good choice on that router! I don't think there'd be a discernible change in latency with one versus the other, but disabling beamforming could potentially help the CPU run faster. Other than that, this is an academic distinction, but between channel 44 and 173, there's a difference of 5 millimeters in the wavelengths.
 
802.11ac by default uses 80mhz of bandwidth. You will cut your top data throughput if you set it to only 40mhz channel width. Then again games do not actually transfer a lot of data.

As indicated if you just talk about the time it takes the radio wave to propagate and latency related to data encoding it is mostly a academic exercise. The main cause of delays in wireless is interference. WiFi unlike most other forms of network media attempt to actually detect and correct transmission errors. It does this by retransmitting the data until it gets a good copy. This of course takes time which is why you see spikes of increased latency in WiFi.

Now in theory at least if you use 20mhz channels you reduce the risk of interference. Then again a neighbor with one of the new tri-band routers is likely already attempting to use almost the available radio channels so you will get interference no matter. If you are lucky and can find 20mhz of bandwidth all to yourself you should get optimum performance.

It used to be a simple solution when everyone only used 20mhz channels. There were enough channels to share now days you have massive number of devices near you all competing for the same radio bandwidth. Pretty much WiFi is a trial and error thing because of so much variation in the environment between different people houses. Even when you get it working perfectly one of those new cars with its mobile wifi drives by your house you can get a short term spike in the latency.



 

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