Question Best value for singlethread, and multithread? ryzen 2700x???

Tad2

Distinguished
Apr 3, 2010
22
0
18,510
Hi, I'm into 3d rendering, but I also want the smoothest silkiest gaming experience I can get.
AND i'm poor.

I'll be building a new system soon, and so far my research points to the ryzen 2700x as being the best value that gives me strong singlethreaded perf (for games)
and still puts down a heavy cinebench multi score (for artwork)

What do you think?
Have I missed anything?

I'm upgrading from an overclocked 3570k
And i'll be most likely buying used.
Also i'm open to older chips, like xeon e5's for example. (gotta love dirt cheap ddr3 memory)
 
2700X the best for its money currently. It has a 4.3ghz max turbo (XFR) decent 1 thread performance and 8c/16t, so for gaming and editing, it is great. It costs a fair bit, however, it is cheap for what it is, and it includes a stock RGB cooler.
The best overall single-threaded and multithreaded chip is the Intel Core I9 9900k. 5ghz turbo and 8c/16t. It is like $500 new and requires an additional beefy cooler.
I agree this all could change with the announcement of Ryzen 3000 in just weeks.
 
Unfortunately, for programs like Adobe CC, Ryzen is not the way to go. Currently, Adobe CC doesn't scale past 8 threads, so the multi threaded monsters like the 2700x are limited to just 8 cores at a lower IPC than Intel. Apart from the 9900k, the single best alternative is the 9700k, which gets better results than many HEDT cpus from last generation.


So I guess it depends on budget vs necessity of gaming vs work as to which is the better overall value
 

Tad2

Distinguished
Apr 3, 2010
22
0
18,510
Thanks. I dont use aftereffects so thats no issue. But it sounds like i was right about the 2700x.
And yes. Ill wait for the new chips to come out, then maybe a used 2700x will be cheaper.
 
how do you know that?
Unless you know the seller, you don't. But today's modern CPUs are pretty inteligent. They throttle back if they get too hot, motherboards limit the voltage quite a bit, and the CPU even shut down to save themselves if needed. So, it isn't quite as important as it used to be. Where were you planning on searching for a used 2700X?
 

Tad2

Distinguished
Apr 3, 2010
22
0
18,510
Unless you know the seller, you don't. But today's modern CPUs are pretty inteligent. They throttle back if they get too hot, motherboards limit the voltage quite a bit, and the CPU even shut down to save themselves if needed. So, it isn't quite as important as it used to be. Where were you planning on searching for a used 2700X?
probably ebay tbh
 
If ebay, then be sure to look for sellers with a good number of sales under their belt, have a rating in the upper 90% range or better, and offer returns. I buy and sell a lot on ebay and haven't had too bad an experience buying if I watch those things.

When you get the new CPU, run a stress test on it (at stock clocks). Check using Ryzen Master that temps stay within the CPU's standard range and it doesn't throttle.
 

Tad2

Distinguished
Apr 3, 2010
22
0
18,510
If ebay, then be sure to look for sellers with a good number of sales under their belt, have a rating in the upper 90% range or better, and offer returns. I buy and sell a lot on ebay and haven't had too bad an experience buying if I watch those things.

When you get the new CPU, run a stress test on it (at stock clocks). Check using Ryzen Master that temps stay within the CPU's standard range and it doesn't throttle.
Ok great advice i will!
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS