[SOLVED] Best X570 for Overclocking.

Globber

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Jan 30, 2014
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I am planning to upgrade to an X570 board. I currently have the ASUS Prime X470 Pro, and I am not a big fan of the board, things like temperature sensors and general features. I am planning to upgrade to X570 for multiple reasons and will be upgrading to a 3xxx CPU later, so I am curious on people's thoughts for which of the X570 boards are working well for overclocking that have built in WiFi? I would like to clock my current chip to around 4200-4400 until I get a Ryzen 2 chip, and that has been really difficult with the Prime board I have. I was thinking about going with ASUS TUF X570 or the ROG Strix X570-E, but I just want to hear some overall suggestions. ASRock Taichi looks good as well, or MSI, but I just don't have much experience with ASRock or MSI. What board is going to be a good overclocker? Thanks!
 
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Overclocking on Ryzen 3K is quite poor by all accounts.

Basically, as far as I'm concerned, upgrading your motherboard for the sake of overclocking is largely a waste of money.
Another way to look at it: since overclocking the CPU enough to see any appreciable performance improvement will mean sub-ambient cooling, e.g., LN2 and so will therefore need the extreme features that requires, then something like X570 Crosshair Hero VIII would correctly be 'the best X570 for overclocking Ry3k'.
 
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TJ Hooker

Illustrious
Herald
I would like to clock my current chip to around 4200-4400 until I get a Ryzen 2 chip, and that has been really difficult with the Prime board I have.
What makes you think its your motherboard that's holding you back and not the CPU itself? 4.2-4.4 GHz is basically the max you can hope to hit on any Ryzen 2K chip no matter what motherboard you have. To be honest, you're probably better off leaving your CPU at stock (or using PBO) rather than manually overclocking, except maybe if you often run heavily threaded apps.
Overclocking on Ryzen 3K is quite poor by all accounts.

Basically, as far as I'm concerned, upgrading your motherboard for the sake of overclocking is largely a waste of money.
 
Reactions: drea.drechsler
....
Overclocking on Ryzen 3K is quite poor by all accounts.

Basically, as far as I'm concerned, upgrading your motherboard for the sake of overclocking is largely a waste of money.
Another way to look at it: since overclocking the CPU enough to see any appreciable performance improvement will mean sub-ambient cooling, e.g., LN2 and so will therefore need the extreme features that requires, then something like X570 Crosshair Hero VIII would correctly be 'the best X570 for overclocking Ry3k'.
 
Reactions: Globber

Globber

Honorable
Jan 30, 2014
163
1
10,695
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What makes you think its your motherboard that's holding you back and not the CPU itself? 4.2-4.4 GHz is basically the max you can hope to hit on any Ryzen 2K chip no matter what motherboard you have. To be honest, you're probably better off leaving your CPU at stock (or using PBO) rather than manually overclocking, except maybe if you often run heavily threaded apps.
Overclocking on Ryzen 3K is quite poor by all accounts.

Basically, as far as I'm concerned, upgrading your motherboard for the sake of overclocking is largely a waste of money.
Thanks, but overclocking is not the main concern. I have more use for the X570 chipset with my NVMe drives and other components, and in general I have had a lot of issues with the board and BIOS, as well as temperature sensors displaying correct temps. I plan to upgrade my board and processor, but it makes more sense for me to upgrade my board first, having a board with stable clocking and accurate sensors is just a feature that I require when upgrading it. Thanks.
 

Globber

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Jan 30, 2014
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Another way to look at it: since overclocking the CPU enough to see any appreciable performance improvement will mean sub-ambient cooling, e.g., LN2 and so will therefore need the extreme features that requires, then something like X570 Crosshair Hero VIII would correctly be 'the best X570 for overclocking Ry3k'.
I was looking at the Crosshair Hero VIII, one thing that I would like is built in WiFi. I know it's not as good as Ethernet, but unfortunately I can't get an ethernet cable wired to my office and desk area. So I am stuck with WiFi for now. I was also looking at the TUF Gaming with WiFi. Any ideas as to how well this board handles that power? Thanks!
 

TJ Hooker

Illustrious
Herald
Thanks, but overclocking is not the main concern. I have more use for the X570 chipset with my NVMe drives and other components, and in general I have had a lot of issues with the board and BIOS, as well as temperature sensors displaying correct temps. I plan to upgrade my board and processor, but it makes more sense for me to upgrade my board first, having a board with stable clocking and accurate sensors is just a feature that I require when upgrading it. Thanks.
Well, your thread is "Best X570 for overclocking" and you repeatedly ask which board would be good for overclocking in your OP.

Have you confirmed that your issues are actually caused by your motherboard? For instance, incorrect temperature readings can easily be the result of the monitoring software you're using. Obviously make sure you're on the latest (stable) BIOS, etc.

Do you have PCIe 4.0 SSD(s)? Or what exactly do you expect an X570 board to do better than your X470?
 

Globber

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Jan 30, 2014
163
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Another way to look at it: since overclocking the CPU enough to see any appreciable performance improvement will mean sub-ambient cooling, e.g., LN2 and so will therefore need the extreme features that requires, then something like X570 Crosshair Hero VIII would correctly be 'the best X570 for overclocking Ry3k'.
I actually did find the Hero with WiFi. It will be the board that I go for.
 

Globber

Honorable
Jan 30, 2014
163
1
10,695
1
Well, your thread is "Best X570 for overclocking" and you repeatedly ask which board would be good for overclocking in your OP.

Have you confirmed that your issues are actually caused by your motherboard? For instance, incorrect temperature readings can easily be the result of the monitoring software you're using. Obviously make sure you're on the latest (stable) BIOS, etc.

Do you have PCIe 4.0 SSD(s)? Or what exactly do you expect an X570 board to do better than your X470?
I have one 4.0 and one 3.0, but the X470 will only run one 3.0 SSD, as I plan on upgrading to Ryzen 3k and want to use both SSDs to their fullest, it makes most sense to upgrade my board first and my CPU later.
 

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