News Better Linux Gaming With Steam and Proton

GenericUser

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Secondly, it does raise some ethical questions as, arguably, running the Windows version under Linux might reduce pressure on the developers to make a Linux native version of a game.
It's never really seemed like there was much pressure on developers to begin with. When Linux is such a small market share compared to Windows for gaming, from a development standpoint, why devote resources to supporting it? Gaming support on Linux has unfortunately been a chicken and egg scenario, since the small market share of users that also game means there's not much incentive to support games for it, and the lack of game support means it's going to keep people away who would otherwise be willing to switch to it (other factors notwithstanding).

I really hope support gets better and better going forward, since it's the only thing holding me back from switching to Linux full time and ditching Windows for good.
 
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For the people here reading this article, please note that EVERYTHING that was done through commands CAN BE DONE WITH A GRAPHICAL INTERFACE.
Installing something requires just a simple search in the INTEGRATED app store on Ubuntu (and whatever distro you use), you just type "Steam" and hit "install", the same with winetricks and proton. YOU DON'T NEED TO LEARN PROGRAMMING OR TO USE COMMANDS ON LINUX TO HAVE A FULL GAMING/USER EXPERIENCE WITH A LINUX SYSTEM.

Some Linux distros (distros are like different versions of Linux, with different interface and programs preinstalled) are for everyone, try it with the same philosophy you have with Windows or Mac and you'll be surprised to see how many things works easier. Other things requires you to do other steps, different from Windows or Mac, but it's not harder, it's just different, and BY NO MEAN you need to use commands for every small thing you want, like installing steam or playing some games.

Linux distros that are for everyone coming from Mac/Windows: ZorinOS, Ubuntu, Manjaro, PopOS... You can try them for free and stick with the one you like the most.

If you want to know more about Linux gaming search for Lutris, it's like a "generic" game launcher that automatizes all the process of gaming without Steam.
 

blppt

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It's never really seemed like there was much pressure on developers to begin with.

Plus, some of the "Linux" versions of games out there are nothing more than an optimized wine wrapper anyways.

On the plus side, dxvk has gotten so good of late that games running on dx9 in windows perform noticeably better in linux, even older MMOs like SWTOR.

Its definitely come a long way since the best you could hope for is 50% of the windows performance when DX API calls were only able to be translated to slow OpenGL.
 
Reactions: tq45
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sounds great but until you get an error message that its hard to know what cause it let alone troubleshoot it.
 

TheOtherOne

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I can never understand why can't all these Linux distros make GUI simple and have double click to open/run/install files like EXE files in Windows? Is it some sort of patent crap that makes them unable to do or is Linux really that complicated that you MUST use command line for simple things? :unsure:

Every time I think of giving Linux a shot after hearing how better gaming on Linux has become since last decade or so ago, the first thing I see is "open terminal and start typing" ... :homer:(n)
 
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I can never understand why can't all these Linux distros make GUI simple and have double click to open/run/install files like EXE files in Windows? Is it some sort of patent crap that makes them unable to do or is Linux really that complicated that you MUST use command line for simple things? :unsure:

Every time I think of giving Linux a shot after hearing how better gaming on Linux has become since last decade or so ago, the first thing I see is "open terminal and start typing" ... :homer:(n)
There are double click and open files for linux. for installing steam there is .deb file in steams own website and ubuntu repositories and for portable apps you can find .appimage files. steam and every other app also exists in distros pre-installed store to be installed with 1 click. but most users don't bother with them because opening terminal and writing 3 words "sudo apt install" and then name of everything you want after those 3 words "sudo apt install steam vlc neovim .... " is simply the superior solution to searching and clicking in store and then more searching and clicking.
 
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ezst036

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I can never understand why can't all these Linux distros make GUI simple and have double click to open/run/install files like EXE files in Windows?
Ease of use is like anything else, there's 20 ways to achieve the same result. Microsoft developed the Windows Store, but Linux distros have had that as a "package manager" for a very long time.

One single search in your package manager for "Firefox" or even "Browser" takes even less work than an installshield. If we want to count mouse clicks, then Linux is indeed easier. This requires a click for search, a click for accept, and a click for done.

That's 3 clicks.

In order to get the downloadable exe, there are several clicks to get through a website and download page, and several clicks of next, next, next, accept, and done.

When the server does the work for you, Linux is easier. It's just a different ease paradigm, that's all.
 

Gahl1k

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Reads the tutorial. Closes the page. Launches Steam on Windows and carries on with life.
That's exactly what I did after trying Linux.

Most beginners install Wine wrong, given "why it's not working" is the most common question you find online. Doesn't help that most Wine installation guides are incomplete. You have to dig to do extra commands that makes it work for older games, and even then everyone tells you to accept the possibility that a game may or may not work (which is something I simply can't live with as I have a big backlog with a wide range of games across different launchers).

A game might launch but not continue working and spits out an error. Good luck finding that specific error online, let alone a solution, especially if it's not a popular title.

Also Ray Tracing? DLSS? DirectStorage? Expect none of that. Workarounds are being made but give them 3-5 years in order to work properly.

It's a shame because I actually liked Linux as an OS. It was easier, faster, and had less bloatware. Except the 'enter password for each and every action.' That crap got annoying fast. It convinced me that I can't ditch Windows yet.
 

Eximo

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I must say my recent experience with Ubuntu wasn't super smooth. Took me like three hours to get an Nvidia driver loaded just so I could test (which required installing Ubuntu onto a thumb drive), and I had a heck of a time installing Unigine Heaven. (All because I basically had to reboot after selecting the driver, which I don't understand why it didn't just ask me during boot what driver it should load...) That whole double click to install would have been super handy, but I had to modify permissions on the file type and do everything from the command line anyway.

I'm sure Steam would be easier, but just not quite there yet for the casual gamer.

And as someone else mentioned, first sign of trouble and it might be hours of googling to solve.
 

TheOtherOne

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There are double click and open files for linux. for installing steam there is .deb file in steams own website and ubuntu repositories and for portable apps you can find .appimage files. steam and every other app also exists in distros pre-installed store to be installed with 1 click. but most users don't bother with them because opening terminal and writing 3 words "sudo apt install" and then name of everything you want after those 3 words "sudo apt install steam vlc neovim .... " is simply the superior solution to searching and clicking in store and then more searching and clicking.
There's a reason why GUI (Graphical User Interface) even with more clicks is considered "easy to use" or "simple", because for average Joe and Jane, it really is. And it doesn't help, as I mentioned, almost every article about Linux has steps to do ONLY with command line. Why would this article, for exp, NOT mention those GUI options if it's aim really is to educate Windows users that Linux is user friendly as well? Any current Linux user most likely already know all that is mentioned in this article and probably even more. But for Windows users, when they see all the command line ONLY options, they just gonna turn their heads and ignore all this.
 
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TJ Hooker

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I must say my recent experience with Ubuntu wasn't super smooth. Took me like three hours to get an Nvidia driver loaded just so I could test (which required installing Ubuntu onto a thumb drive), and I had a heck of a time installing Unigine Heaven. (All because I basically had to reboot after selecting the driver, which I don't understand why it didn't just ask me during boot what driver it should load...) That whole double click to install would have been super handy, but I had to modify permissions on the file type and do everything from the command line anyway.

I'm sure Steam would be easier, but just not quite there yet for the casual gamer.

And as someone else mentioned, first sign of trouble and it might be hours of googling to solve.
From what I've heard, Pop!_OS (which is based on Ubuntu) is the best, hassle-free option for Nvidia GPU users, as I believe it will auto-install their proprietary drivers.

With an AMD GPU (or Intel iGPU), getting Ubuntu up and running should be pretty painless, I don't think you'd have to use the command line at all.
 

TJ Hooker

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There's a reason why GUI (Graphical User Interface) even with more clicks is considered "easy to use" or "simple", because for average Joe and Jane, it really is. And it doesn't help, as I mentioned, almost every article about Linux has steps to do ONLY with command line. Why would this article, for exp, NOT mention those GUI options if it's aim really is to educate Windows users that Linux is user friendly as well? Any current Linux user most likely already know all that is mentioned in this article and probably even more. But for Windows users, when they see all the command line ONLY options, they just gonna turn their heads and ignore all this.
I think this may be because there are so many GUIs available for Linux. So trying to make a guide on how to do something with GUI that would cover every GUI out there wouldn't be easy. Not to mention trying to update it as the GUIs change over time. Even with Windows, a GUI guide for Win7 may not work for Win10, and even within Win10 things may have changed/moved around since the guide was written.

Terminal commands typically aren't going to change much over time, and can often apply to a wide variety of Linux distros. That being said, with Ubuntu being such a popular distro, if you search for a guide for doing something in Ubuntu (rather than just searching for how to do it in Linux), I'd say there's a decent chance you'll find a guide on how to do it via GUI.
 

blppt

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I can never understand why can't all these Linux distros make GUI simple and have double click to open/run/install files like EXE files in Windows? Is it some sort of patent crap that makes them unable to do or is Linux really that complicated that you MUST use command line for simple things? :unsure:

Every time I think of giving Linux a shot after hearing how better gaming on Linux has become since last decade or so ago, the first thing I see is "open terminal and start typing" ... :homer:(n)
Its a lot easier now with the rise of Ubuntu and its subsequent boost of debian. I should tell you stories of how things used to be back in the day with Red Hat, Slack or Caldera where you had to hunt down dependencies to get packages to install, or to build binaries.

Its come a long way. Debian is downright simple nowadays.
 

blppt

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That's exactly what I did after trying Linux.

Most beginners install Wine wrong, given "why it's not working" is the most common question you find online. Doesn't help that most Wine installation guides are incomplete. You have to dig to do extra commands that makes it work for older games, and even then everyone tells you to accept the possibility that a game may or may not work (which is something I simply can't live with as I have a big backlog with a wide range of games across different launchers).

A game might launch but not continue working and spits out an error. Good luck finding that specific error online, let alone a solution, especially if it's not a popular title.

Also Ray Tracing? DLSS? DirectStorage? Expect none of that. Workarounds are being made but give them 3-5 years in order to work properly.

It's a shame because I actually liked Linux as an OS. It was easier, faster, and had less bloatware. Except the 'enter password for each and every action.' That crap got annoying fast. It convinced me that I can't ditch Windows yet.
You don't even need to 'install wine' anymore----automated game launchers like Lutris or the even slicker Steam (Proton) will do all that stuff for you.

IIRC, Ubuntu even comes with wine installed by default, though it is an older, generic version.
 

blppt

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From what I've heard, Pop!_OS (which is based on Ubuntu) is the best, hassle-free option for Nvidia GPU users, as I believe it will auto-install their proprietary drivers.

With an AMD GPU (or Intel iGPU), getting Ubuntu up and running should be pretty painless, I don't think you'd have to use the command line at all.
Ubuntu will also install proprietary drivers during installation, if you click the box.
 
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I always knew that Linus is far more better than windows at any point in time, and optimal gaming performance is an example for that.
 

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