News Binning Your Binned CPU: Der8auer Sells 5.3GHz 9900KS's In Germany

MatBailie

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Jun 29, 2016
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Isn't thermal paste what's on the outside of the CPU?
Yeah,he says : " Der8auer also engraves the IHS (integrated heatspreader), and replaces the factory thermal paste"
so it's the normal paste not the tim.
Der8auer has form here. On the original 9900K he delidded the CPUs, lapped the dies, and re-lidded with the liquid metal which he has a financial stake in. The 9900K did use STIM but he claimed a 9 degree reduction in temps doing this.

So, no, this isn't a remark about the normal thermal paste applied between the CPU and the heat sink (be it air or liquid cooled).

https://www.techpowerup.com/248735/intel-core-i9-9900k-de-lidded-soldered-tim-outperformed-by-liquid-metal
 
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CompuTronix

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Here's the fascinating YouTube from der8auer explaining his procedure for delidding the soldered 9900K, which includes his investigation into the thickness of the Indium solder and Die, as well as relidding with Thermal Grizzly Conductonaut: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r5Doo-zgyQs

For comparison purposes, information concerning Silicon Lottery's findings on the effectiveness of delidding Intel processors from 3rd Generation Ivy Bridge to 9th Generation Coffee Lake Refresh is in Section 9 - The TIM Problem: Intel Temperature Guide: https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/intel-temperature-guide.1488337/
 

TJ Hooker

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Isn't thermal paste what's on the outside of the CPU?
Yeah,he says : " Der8auer also engraves the IHS (integrated heatspreader), and replaces the factory thermal paste"
so it's the normal paste not the tim.
Thermal paste can be (and in many cases, is) used as TIM between the die and IHS. Given that the 9900KS is soldered and doesn't come with any stock cooler/(external) paste, referring to "factory thermal paste" doesn't make sense. I can only assume the author made a mistake and meant to write "factory TIM".
 
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CompuTronix

Intel Master
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Thermal paste can be (and in many cases, is) used as TIM between the die and IHS. Given that the 9900KS doesn't come with any stock cooler/(external) paste, referring to "factory thermal paste" doesn't make sense. I can only assume the author made a mistake and meant to write "factory TIM".
Exactly. Understanding the issues requires keeping the terminology straight, so it's just an oversight on behalf of the author.

The term "Thermal Interface Material" or "TIM" is also called "thermal compound" but is more commonly known as "paste". TIM is a generic term used for any material used for transferring heat from one surface to another, whether it's from the Die to the IHS, or from the IHS to the cooler.

When used between the IHS and the cooler, TIM almost always refers to paste, but serious overclockers might instead choose to use liquid metal. However, when used between the Die and the IHS, the most effective TIM is "Indium" solder, which Intel used on 2nd Generation Sandy Bridge and earlier processors.

With 3rd Generation Ivy Bridge processors, Intel began using paste between the Die and the IHS, which is when "delidding" became the go-to solution for overclockers. Since IHS soldering is a complicated and exacting process far beyond the capabilities of end users, replacing the paste with liquid metal is the practical answer to regain thermal efficiency lost when Intel changed from solder (sTIM) to paste (pTIM).

With 9th Generation, Intel returned to solder due to the high power consumption and heat dissipation problems with the 8 core 16 thread 9900K, which became blatantly evident with the 6 core 12 thread 8700K. Nonetheless, Intel made the Die and the solder thicker on 9th Generation, which although is a compromise, is still an improvement over paste, but less efficient than 2nd Generation Sandy Bridge and earlier processors.

Note that delidding requires the use of only liquid metal TIM between the Die and IHS. Typical silicon TIM will fail in a relatively brief period of time. A process known as “pump-out” will cause silicon TIM to ooze out from between the Die and IHS due to thermal cycling. Intel's TIM is formulated to resist pump out, but has relatively poor thermal conductivity. It also degrades, but over longer periods of time. A highly recommended liquid metal TIM is Thermal Grizzly Conductonaut.

Here’s the short list in order of thermal conductivity:

Indium - 81.8 W/mk (Used in processors with soldered IHS)

Liquid Metal TIM (IHS to Die)

Thermal Grizzly Conductonaut - 73.0 W/mk
CoolLaboratory Liquid Ultra - 38.4 W/mk
CoolLaboratory Liquid Pro - 32.6 W/mk

Typical Silicon TIM (IHS to Cooler)

Thermal Grizzly Kryonaut - 12.5 W/mk
Arctic Silver 5 - 9.0 W/mk
Arctic Cooling MX4 - 8.5 W/mk
 
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