Question BIOS and PC doesn't detect my SSD?

Jan 4, 2021
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I have 1TB storage on an HDD.
I have a 240GB storage on an SSD

After I woke up this morning to hop on my PC. I realised I was booting from my HDD. Thinking I knew how to solve the issue, I opened my BIOS settings and went to boot order. My primary boot was my HDD so I tried to change it to my SSD. My SSD wasn't detected in my drives so I was confused.

Now, I thought it was because last night I opened up my PC case to look at the components inside. In a couple weeks I'll be installing a new CPU so I wanted to see where things went, etc. I closed it up, turned it on and played games on my SSD like any other night.

So, me opening the PC didn't have to do with why this isn't working because I was able to boot from SSD last night.

I opened Device Manager and found that in my drives, it also locates only my HDD? Normally it locates both so at this point, I have no idea what's going on. Any help would be greatly appreciated!



EDIT: For some odd reason, after being on my HDD for half an hour, my SSD randomly decided to reappear and I can boot from it now? Why did this happen?
 
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I have 1TB storage on an HDD.
I have a 240GB storage on an SSD

After I woke up this morning to hop on my PC. I realised I was booting from my HDD. Thinking I knew how to solve the issue, I opened my BIOS settings and went to boot order. My primary boot was my HDD so I tried to change it to my SSD. My SSD wasn't detected in my drives so I was confused.

Now, I thought it was because last night I opened up my PC case to look at the components inside. In a couple weeks I'll be installing a new CPU so I wanted to see where things went, etc. I closed it up, turned it on and played games on my SSD like any other night.

So, me opening the PC didn't have to do with why this isn't working because I was able to boot from SSD last night.

I opened Device Manager and found that in my drives, it also locates only my HDD? Normally it locates both so at this point, I have no idea what's going on. Any help would be greatly appreciated!



EDIT: For some odd reason, after being on my HDD for half an hour, my SSD randomly decided to reappear and I can boot from it now? Why did this happen?
Make sure you or the case didnt move the cables well looking around or sliding on. Open the case back up really quick and make sure satas are fully seated
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
What are your FULL hardware specifications including the SSD model, motherboard model, power supply EXACT model, etc?

What motherboard BIOS version is currently installed?

Are the motherboard chipset and storage controller drivers up to date, based on what is directly available from the motherboard (Or prebuilt system manufacturer's) manufacturer's product support page for that motherboard?

Is Windows itself fully up to date, with all Windows updates applied including any applicable Windows build version updates?

I would recommend that if there is anything important on the SSD, that you back it up immediately, and then run a series of drive health tests on it such as the Seatools for Windows (Or Seatools USB bootable) utility and run the Short drive self test (DST) or long generic (Extended) tests, which is what Seagate recommends doing for all supported hard drives AND solid state drives. The brand does not matter, as the tests being run are compatible with all drive brands.


This sounds like it could be either a drive that is failing prematurely OR a bad cable. You might want to remove the cable and reseat it, or replace it entirely with a different cable.

Also, if you had that HDD attached to the system when you installed Windows on the SSD, you REALLY want to back up everything important on the SSD to some other location and reinstall Windows over again WITHOUT that HDD attached to the system. Often what happens is that the EFI and boot partitions that existed previously on the HDD if the HDD previously HAD Windows installed on it, tricks the installer into believing that it does not need to create a new EFI and boot partition and it simply uses the one that is already present on the HDD. This can create a number of problems, and usually does at some point.

For example, in such a scenario, if the HDD fails or is disconnected, then Windows on the SSD will immediately fail to be able to boot because it's boot partition will be missing. There are a few additional problems this can create as well but suffice to say it is an undesirable configuration and should be properly reconfigured as soon as possible IF that is the case.
 
Jan 4, 2021
56
2
45
0
What are your FULL hardware specifications including the SSD model, motherboard model, power supply EXACT model, etc?

What motherboard BIOS version is currently installed?

Are the motherboard chipset and storage controller drivers up to date, based on what is directly available from the motherboard (Or prebuilt system manufacturer's) manufacturer's product support page for that motherboard?

Is Windows itself fully up to date, with all Windows updates applied including any applicable Windows build version updates?

I would recommend that if there is anything important on the SSD, that you back it up immediately, and then run a series of drive health tests on it such as the Seatools for Windows (Or Seatools USB bootable) utility and run the Short drive self test (DST) or long generic (Extended) tests, which is what Seagate recommends doing for all supported hard drives AND solid state drives. The brand does not matter, as the tests being run are compatible with all drive brands.


This sounds like it could be either a drive that is failing prematurely OR a bad cable. You might want to remove the cable and reseat it, or replace it entirely with a different cable.

Also, if you had that HDD attached to the system when you installed Windows on the SSD, you REALLY want to back up everything important on the SSD to some other location and reinstall Windows over again WITHOUT that HDD attached to the system. Often what happens is that the EFI and boot partitions that existed previously on the HDD if the HDD previously HAD Windows installed on it, tricks the installer into believing that it does not need to create a new EFI and boot partition and it simply uses the one that is already present on the HDD. This can create a number of problems, and usually does at some point.

For example, in such a scenario, if the HDD fails or is disconnected, then Windows on the SSD will immediately fail to be able to boot because it's boot partition will be missing. There are a few additional problems this can create as well but suffice to say it is an undesirable configuration and should be properly reconfigured as soon as possible IF that is the case.
I've had my SSD for about a month and my HDD for around a year. When I opened my PC, I cleaned a little bit of the fans as they were covered in a lot of dust. The next thing I did while looking around the components was touch my SSD, I never pulled or moved it.

Here are my specs you needed:

Power Supply: Thermaltake 750W
SSD: KINGSTON SA400S37240G
HDD: Seagate ST31000528AS
Motherboard: MSI 2A9C

P.S. Every cord was unplugged and the power supply was disabled.
 
Jan 4, 2021
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Make sure you or the case didnt move the cables well looking around or sliding on. Open the case back up really quick and make sure satas are fully seated
Where are the SATA cables located? The only thing I did was put my PC on it's side, would it of really moved my cables?
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Ok, well, I've got to be honest, that motherboard is so old that it would not be AT ALL surprising if the motherboard or the onboard storage controllers were failing.

Try unplugging the power and SATA data cables from the hard drive, plug the SATA data cable into the SSD in place of the one that is currently plugged into the SSD. Do not plug anything back into the HDD for now.

Be sure that the power is off and that the power switch on the back of the power supply is off (The "0" position) or unplugged from the wall, before you start unplugging and moving cables around inside the case. Then after making the cable swap (And we are trying to use a different cable for the SSD here AND a different SATA header on the motherboard, which is why you want to swap the HDD cable over to the SSD and then just don't plug the ones from the SSD into anything until later) switch the PSU back on and power up the system. Go into the BIOS and see if the SSD is showing up now.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
If you don't know what the SATA cables are or where they are located, then it might be a very good idea to get some help from somebody who is familiar with working inside a computer. At least until you get the chance to watch and familiarize yourself.

If that's not an option, then I'd suggest watching a few Youtube videos on changing hard drive cables and general service before you try doing anything inside.

 
Jan 4, 2021
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Ok, well, I've got to be honest, that motherboard is so old that it would not be AT ALL surprising if the motherboard or the onboard storage controllers were failing.

Try unplugging the power and SATA data cables from the hard drive, plug the SATA data cable into the SSD in place of the one that is currently plugged into the SSD. Do not plug anything back into the HDD for now.

Be sure that the power is off and that the power switch on the back of the power supply is off (The "0" position) or unplugged from the wall, before you start unplugging and moving cables around inside the case. Then after making the cable swap (And we are trying to use a different cable for the SSD here AND a different SATA header on the motherboard, which is why you want to swap the HDD cable over to the SSD and then just don't plug the ones from the SSD into anything until later) switch the PSU back on and power up the system. Go into the BIOS and see if the SSD is showing up now.
Thing is, even without doing anything, the SSD is showing up now?

Do I still do what you mentioned, because this is the first time it's happened.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Problems like this RARELY just "go away" or "fix themselves" in any permanent sort of way. It's possible it was just some kind of "glitch", but it's rather unlikely. It will probably happen again but the next time it may be a permanent situation.

Try this.

Shut down.

Take the side panel off.

Unplug the SATA data cable or the power cable, from the hard drive but leave the SSD plugged in. Power back on and see if the system will boot into Windows. If it will, then great, shut back down, power off, plug the HDD back in and go on with life unless it happens again, and if it does happen again, then follow the steps I listed earlier including swapping out or changing the SATA cable to a new one as a first step.

If it won't boot, then I'd power off, plug the HDD back in, then see if it will boot. If it will, back up everything important to someplace else, another drive, flash drive, optical disk, the HDD, cloud storage, somewhere, and then shut back down, unplug the HDD and reinstall Windows EXACTLY as outlined here:



But, I would still run the Seatools for Windows utility no matter what, just to check the drive health of both drives. Run the Short DST (Drive self test) and the Long generic (Extended) tests. DST first, long generic second. Run it on the SSD first, and then on the HDD. Report back with the results. Be aware that running the long generic/extended test is likely to take a few hours on the HDD for sure.
 
Jan 4, 2021
56
2
45
0
Problems like this RARELY just "go away" or "fix themselves" in any permanent sort of way. It's possible it was just some kind of "glitch", but it's rather unlikely. It will probably happen again but the next time it may be a permanent situation.

Try this.

Shut down.

Take the side panel off.

Unplug the SATA data cable or the power cable, from the hard drive but leave the SSD plugged in. Power back on and see if the system will boot into Windows. If it will, then great, shut back down, power off, plug the HDD back in and go on with life unless it happens again, and if it does happen again, then follow the steps I listed earlier including swapping out or changing the SATA cable to a new one as a first step.

If it won't boot, then I'd power off, plug the HDD back in, then see if it will boot. If it will, back up everything important to someplace else, another drive, flash drive, optical disk, the HDD, cloud storage, somewhere, and then shut back down, unplug the HDD and reinstall Windows EXACTLY as outlined here:



But, I would still run the Seatools for Windows utility no matter what, just to check the drive health of both drives. Run the Short DST (Drive self test) and the Long generic (Extended) tests. DST first, long generic second. Run it on the SSD first, and then on the HDD. Report back with the results. Be aware that running the long generic/extended test is likely to take a few hours on the HDD for sure.
Before doing any of that I somehow came across another issue. I was enjoying being on my SSD and then decided to restart my PC. As it loaded up it said things like, 'Repairing C:" and I thought it was doing something like a Window Update. I let it load and at then for some reason, my PC is asking for my password to be changed? Thing is, I never had one in the first place. It was built by a person I paid for and it never had a password. It had the following...

Original Password:
New Password:
Confirm New Password:

I tried many passwords like Microsoft and my HDD Windows password but now I can't even sign in to my SSD. Man, today is really <Mod Edit> :/
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
"Repairing" is never "like a Windows update". Repairing means something has been corrupted, either because you fiddled with something in the registry, or the boot process was interrupted and, to quote Microsoft, "something happened", or the system lost power or any number of reasons where for whatever reason something that normally contributes to the normal boot process whether through the registry settings and configuration or the boot partition, was affected or corrupted and Windows cannot boot.

Or, the system is just weirding out for no reason. In any case, I normally ONLY allow the system to try and "repair" itself as a last ditch option because usually it doesn't work and it almost always completely borks the Windows installation up when it doesn't work.

As far as the passwords go, sorry, we can't help with ANYTHING that is meant to assist with bypassing security or password protocols no matter how obvious it is that the system belongs to you. This is a hard, fast forum rule and is not ever an option.

The only thing I CAN suggest, or offer, is whether you actually tried NOT putting anything into the password field.

If you have tried that, and it didn't work, and you have no way to know the password, then my advice would be that you need to do a clean install of Windows. Unfortunately, that means you're going to lose whatever is on that drive, so hopefully you FIRST followed my advice to back up anything important OR you already had whatever was important backed up elsewhere to start with.

Instructions on doing a clean install are already up above.
 
Jan 4, 2021
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"Repairing" is never "like a Windows update". Repairing means something has been corrupted, either because you fiddled with something in the registry, or the boot process was interrupted and, to quote Microsoft, "something happened", or the system lost power or any number of reasons where for whatever reason something that normally contributes to the normal boot process whether through the registry settings and configuration or the boot partition, was affected or corrupted and Windows cannot boot.

Or, the system is just weirding out for no reason. In any case, I normally ONLY allow the system to try and "repair" itself as a last ditch option because usually it doesn't work and it almost always completely borks the Windows installation up when it doesn't work.

As far as the passwords go, sorry, we can't help with ANYTHING that is meant to assist with bypassing security or password protocols no matter how obvious it is that the system belongs to you. This is a hard, fast forum rule and is not ever an option.

The only thing I CAN suggest, or offer, is whether you actually tried NOT putting anything into the password field.

If you have tried that, and it didn't work, and you have no way to know the password, then my advice would be that you need to do a clean install of Windows. Unfortunately, that means you're going to lose whatever is on that drive, so hopefully you FIRST followed my advice to back up anything important OR you already had whatever was important backed up elsewhere to start with.

Instructions on doing a clean install are already up above.
Thank you so much for the help, however I have one more issue. My BIOS isn't detecting my USB. Should I download the .iso file instead?
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
What "kind" of USB drive are you trying to use? Is it an external drive of some kind, or a flash/thumb drive? What USB port type are you trying to use it in? Is the USB port black, blue, red, yellow, USB 2.0/3.0 etc.? Is it a USB hub, front case panel, rear of case, etc.?

Do you have a DIFFERENT thumb drive you can use? What system did you create the USB thumb drive installation media for Windows ON?

No, the ISO file is probably useless to you unless you have a system with an optical DVD or Blu ray drive and a DVD blank disk and know how to burn an ISO to a disk image.

If you have trouble with creating USB media and using it, then doing it with an optical disk isn't likely to be any easier or any more successful.

Also, if your BIOS isn't recognizing ANY of the USB ports, and you should try several of them, and you NEED to plug the drive in BEFORE you boot into the BIOS, then it's likely your motherboard is dead or dying.
 
Jan 4, 2021
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What "kind" of USB drive are you trying to use? Is it an external drive of some kind, or a flash/thumb drive? What USB port type are you trying to use it in? Is the USB port black, blue, red, yellow, USB 2.0/3.0 etc.? Is it a USB hub, front case panel, rear of case, etc.?

Do you have a DIFFERENT thumb drive you can use? What system did you create the USB thumb drive installation media for Windows ON?

No, the ISO file is probably useless to you unless you have a system with an optical DVD or Blu ray drive and a DVD blank disk and know how to burn an ISO to a disk image.

If you have trouble with creating USB media and using it, then doing it with an optical disk isn't likely to be any easier or any more successful.

Also, if your BIOS isn't recognizing ANY of the USB ports, and you should try several of them, and you NEED to plug the drive in BEFORE you boot into the BIOS, then it's likely your motherboard is dead or dying.
Don't worry, I fixed everything! Even though my USB wasn't appearing, it's kind of a good thing. I didn't have to completely reinstall Windows 10 on my SSD as I found a solution to this thread: https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/after-booting-it-says-i-need-to-change-my-password-however-i-never-set-a-password-in-the-first-place.3677230/#post-22146171
 

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