Question Bios Auto voltage setting Ryzen 3600XT to 1.4V

Gyoung123

Commendable
Jun 9, 2020
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Hi Everyone,

I recently bought a 3080 TI And was looking into overclocking as I believe my CPU Could be a bit of a bottle neck. But when researching I came across a question. First, specs:

Motherboard: asus rog strix b450-f
GPU: Zotac 3080 Ti Trinity (Not OC)
CPU: Ryzen 3600XT
Ram: Viper 2x 8GB 3600MHz
PSU: Seasonic focus + Platinum 750W

So, when looking into overclocking my 3600XT I came across a lot of comments saying that 1.4V Can cause degradation in the CPU. Now, when I went to my BOIS the voltage was set to Auto and this appeared to be at 1.4V
I've been running this setup for years and as far as I can tell my CPU still is performing well (I know user benchmark isnt be best but its usually above expectations)

However, should I reduce this? Is this voltage safe for the 3600XT? And how would i go about setting this in the bios?

e.g. do I set a manual override to 1.3V in the Bios or is this something I can change in the Ryzen software? (I currently can't see any way to change it from there though, it goes up to 1.4 when I run a stress test but the acual value cant be clicked up or down)

EDIT: I just checked the voltage when running afterburner stress test and it goes as high as 1.425!

Thanks in advance
 

Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
Yes high voltage being fed into any component can and will degrade the component's lifespan in spite keeping said component cool. AUTO always meant that the highest possible voltage was being pushed to ensure stability given how one processor can and will vary with regards to power draw(silicon lottery). What BIOS version are you currently on for your motherboard? You should look into swapping the processor out for something in the 5000 series and forgo overclocking on your current processor, IMHO.
 

Gyoung123

Commendable
Jun 9, 2020
25
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1,530
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I imagined I would need a new CPU at some point, I upgraded from a stock 1080 so its still a huge upgrade.


Bios version is 2.17.1246 - I havent upgraded it since buying as I heard bios updates can be tricky and brick if done wrong?

But in the meantime, how do I go about lowering the core voltage and whats a safe level? If its safe to assume that I will be getting a new CPU in the future, In the meantime I'd like to stabilise the voltage and get what I can out of this CPU as the change won't be immediate. Should I manually override it in the BIOS?

As as side note, which processor is recommended to not bottleneck?
 
I imagined I would need a new CPU at some point, I upgraded from a stock 1080 so its still a huge upgrade.


Bios version is 2.17.1246 - I havent upgraded it since buying as I heard bios updates can be tricky and brick if done wrong?

But in the meantime, how do I go about lowering the core voltage and whats a safe level? If its safe to assume that I will be getting a new CPU in the future, In the meantime I'd like to stabilise the voltage and get what I can out of this CPU as the change won't be immediate. Should I manually override it in the BIOS?

As as side note, which processor is recommended to not bottleneck?
Ryzen ie designed to run up to 1.5v as long as cooling is adequate but less is desirable of course. I doubt you would se any deterioration in it's life time or maybe yours. Best way is to use negative voltage offset in BIOS and let voltage scale up and down as needed.
 

Gyoung123

Commendable
Jun 9, 2020
25
0
1,530
0
Ryzen ie designed to run up to 1.5v as long as cooling is adequate but less is desirable of course. I doubt you would se any deterioration in it's life time or maybe yours. Best way is to use negative voltage offset in BIOS and let voltage scale up and down as needed.
How do I go about setting the negative offset?

I've been playing around in Ryzen master and can get it to 4600 with 1.35 voltage set in the BIOS and on the software.

However, when I change my Voltage in the BIOS It defaults to around 1.28V, which I cant seem to change, so to get to 1.35 I would need to use a positive offset.

Would this work? Ideally I would like to have a scaling voltage like you mentioned so its not at 1.35V All the time but only when its needed. Could using the positive offset achieve this? You're also of the opinion 1.35V IS relatively save with this CPU? (Granted, Ive had it on auto for years where it's been using 1.4-1.425 and I havent seen any degradation.... Not that I would know how to test this but nothing noticeable, how would you know if its having a negative effect?). I'm hoping 4600 and 1.35V Will be fine until I eventually get a new CPU Somewhere within the next year.


Thanks for both the responses so far.
 
How do I go about setting the negative offset?

I've been playing around in Ryzen master and can get it to 4600 with 1.35 voltage set in the BIOS and on the software.

However, when I change my Voltage in the BIOS It defaults to around 1.28V, which I cant seem to change, so to get to 1.35 I would need to use a positive offset.

Would this work? Ideally I would like to have a scaling voltage like you mentioned so its not at 1.35V All the time but only when its needed. Could using the positive offset achieve this? You're also of the opinion 1.35V IS relatively save with this CPU? (Granted, Ive had it on auto for years where it's been using 1.4-1.425 and I havent seen any degradation.... Not that I would know how to test this but nothing noticeable, how would you know if its having a negative effect?). I'm hoping 4600 and 1.35V Will be fine until I eventually get a new CPU Somewhere within the next year.


Thanks for both the responses so far.
Voltage settings should be in BIOS Advanced menu under DIGI+ VRM section where it says Auto and can change to manual or Offset (positive or negative) -0.1v usually works but may need some less or more depending on chip quality. You'll have to test it yourself.
One more thing, don't make changes to any settings in Ryzen Master and BIOS, they may clash or cancel each other, do it in BIOS only and RM for viewing what's going on.
 

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