Question BIOS UPDATE CAUSE BLACK SCREEN

Apr 29, 2022
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Pc ran into a bunch of problems after installing new cpu. Before I switched my cpu, I updated my bios to a new version since my new cpu required it. I switch out my cpu with a new one and my boom it turns on. However, it was only showing 2 cores and 4 threads when its 6 cores 12 threads and someone on the forum suggested to make sure my bios was updated to the newest version which it was not since I only updated to the required version to run it. So I update my bios again and after my pc resets, my screen is black with no mouse signal or keyboard signal. I attempted to clear my cmos, take out my cmos battery, try old ram and unplugging my pc and I have had 0 success. I don’t know what to do to fix it and I don’t know if I need a new motherboard. Someone please help me out if you can.

AMD RYZEN 5 5600x
AMD A30M-S2H
16GB 3200mhz ram
1TB SSD
RX 570x
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Did you previously make sure you updated to BIOS version F32 before updating to any newer version than F32, because it's clearly outlined as a requirement prior to updating to versions newer than F32. If not, then it's likely your board is bricked now since that board lacks BIOS flashback or any way to easily update the BIOS aside from sending it to the manufacturer to be reflashed.
 
Apr 29, 2022
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Did you previously make sure you updated to BIOS version F32 before updating to any newer version than F32, because it's clearly outlined as a requirement prior to updating to versions newer than F32. If not, then it's likely your board is bricked now since that board lacks BIOS flashback or any way to easily update the BIOS aside from sending it to the manufacturer to be reflashed.
I updated it to t54e first then went to the newest version
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
What version was it on before you installed t54e, because clearly you had problems after you installed that BIOS version and if you did NOT install version F32 before you installed version t54e, like it specifically tells you to do on the BIOS update page, then you probably bricked the board.

EVERY SINGLE BIOS version after F32 specifically states in bright red letters that you MUST update to version F32 before updating to version F40 or newer. If you had an older version than F32 installed and you installed F40 or newer, you bricked the board.
 
Apr 29, 2022
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What version was it on before you installed t54e, because clearly you had problems after you installed that BIOS version and if you did NOT install version F32 before you installed version t54e, like it specifically tells you to do on the BIOS update page, then you probably bricked the board.

EVERY SINGLE BIOS version after F32 specifically states in bright red letters that you MUST update to version F32 before updating to version F40 or newer. If you had an older version than F32 installed and you installed F40 or newer, you bricked the board.
Yes I checked using system information before I updated, i was aware of that and my bios came originally with F40 or one of 2019 versions when I got my pc
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Ok, so that's good at least.

Unfortunately, if you have already done a hard reset of the BIOS, like outlined below, EXACTLY like outlined below, and you still have nothing but a black screen, there's not much you can do other than send it back to the manufacturer for repair or replacement, if it is still under warranty, or replace it yourself with something newer, which might just be the better idea anyhow if you can afford to do that.

BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, IF the problem is related to a lack of video signal, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.

Trying a different monitor as well, if possible, is also a good idea if there is a lack of display. It happens.
 
Apr 29, 2022
5
0
10
0
Ok, so that's good at least.

Unfortunately, if you have already done a hard reset of the BIOS, like outlined below, EXACTLY like outlined below, and you still have nothing but a black screen, there's not much you can do other than send it back to the manufacturer for repair or replacement, if it is still under warranty, or replace it yourself with something newer, which might just be the better idea anyhow if you can afford to do that.

BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, IF the problem is related to a lack of video signal, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.

Trying a different monitor as well, if possible, is also a good idea if there is a lack of display. It happens.
thanks for the help, I’ll try that. I did a hard reset before and I didn’t press the power button continuously.Also, If it’s not too much to ask, are there any motherboards in like the 150-200 price range that come with the bios to run my Ryzen 5 5600x. I don’t want to have to update my bios and risk it all again
 

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