Question Black screen on boot, need multiple manual power downs and restarts to post?

May 6, 2022
3
0
10
0
Hi all,

I have been suffering from a perplexing issue with my PC for over a year now, and I have no idea what to do. To summarize: nearly every time I power on my PC, all components will power up, LEDs will turn on, keyboard and mouse will light up, but the monitor will remain black. I then have to, pressing the power button, turn the PC off. Depending on the day, I will repeatedly turn on and turn off the PC, with the power button and without any post, multiple times. Sometimes it only needs to be powered off once and then turned back on. This issue also happens any time I need to restart the PC from within Windows, say, after installing an update: the PC will fail to restart, all components will be powered on, but the screen will be black, requiring me to manually power down the PC with the power button and turn it back on.

On very rare occasions, the PC will boot all the way into Windows without posting anything to the monitor, as indicated by the Windows 11 boot up sound. Once the PC is on, there are no issues: it plays games at 1440p on Ultra without a hitch; there are no weird issues; there are no thermal problems; nothing—it works exactly as it should. I have tried a litany of things to resolve it, starting with the GPU:

GPU:
  • RMA'd GPU to manufacturer (Gigabyte).
  • No issues found: GPU returned to me.
  • However, a quick search of Nvidia forms reveals people using my GPU (RTX 2070 Super) have been plagued by this issue.
PSU:
  • Checked voltage with paper clip method, worked.
  • Replaced PSU anyway: issue persists.
RAM:
  • Disabling XMP: no change.
  • Enabling XMP: no change.
  • All RAM appears in system, no evidence of failures.
Monitor:
  • Tried with different computers: no issue.
  • Tried multiple cables: standard DisplayPort, HDMI, HDMI to DisplayPort—issue persists.
  • Also tried connecting PC to a different monitor/HDTV, issue still occurred.
Motherboard:
  • Flahsed BIOS, using most recent version: issue persists.
Software:
  • Have reinstalled Windows multiple times.
  • Issue present on both Windows 10 and Windows 11.
  • Update all firmware (e.g., chipset, SSDs), issue persists.
  • Removed all RGB & MSI software, issue persists.
General:
  • Changed PCI slots, issue persists.
  • Reset GPU power pins, issue persists.
Power Settings:
  • Disabled fast boot in Windows and BIOS.
  • Disabled hibernation.
  • Changed power settings to maximum performance, issue persists.
System Specs:
Gigabyte RTX 2070 Super
i7-9700k @ 3.6GHz
GSKILL Trident Z 32GB (4x8GB) DDR4 @ 3000MHz (XMP)
MSI MPG Z390 Gaming Edge Motherboard
EVGA 1000GQ 80+ Gold semi-modular PSU
1TB Samsung 860 EVO SSD (boot disk)
1TB WD Blue 3D NAND SSD
3TB 7200 HDD
NZXT H510 Case

I am so frustrated and cannot take this anymore: I am in desperate need for help. Any recommendations and guidance you can provide is very appreciated!
 

DRagor

Illustrious
When it fails to post what is the sequence of EZ Debug LEDs?
Put GPU into second x16 slot and see if it makes any difference.

Generally it has to be either GPU or motherboard problem. Even if Gigabyte considers GPU to be working it still does not mean it will work flawlessly with your motherboard. Such things happen. In such case you will need to swap the components, even if they are otherwise perfectly fine.
 
May 6, 2022
3
0
10
0
When it fails to post what is the sequence of EZ Debug LEDs?
Put GPU into second x16 slot and see if it makes any difference.

Generally it has to be either GPU or motherboard problem. Even if Gigabyte considers GPU to be working it still does not mean it will work flawlessly with your motherboard. Such things happen. In such case you will need to swap the components, even if they are otherwise perfectly fine.
Cheers for the reply. In my own naivete, I didn't even know my motherboard has this feature. Just rebooted: it's definitely holding the led for VGA. So the GPU is failing to be detected. Sigh. Also, I've switched the x16 slots multiple times, that hasn't changed the outcome. :/

Do you have any recommendations on trying to determine if it's on the motherboard or GPU side? Thanks so much!
 
Last edited:

DRagor

Illustrious
Just rebooted: it's definitely holding the led for VGA.
That's actually good news - it means no other component but GPU and mobo are involved.
Also, I've switched the x16 slots multiple times, that hasn't changed the outcome. :/
Well, didn't expect it to fix the problem, that would be too much luck. But it suggest the problem is more likely GPU side. Again, it does not mean GPU is bad (it could be though) but rather there is a problem in GPU-mobo communication.
Do you have any recommendations on trying to determine if it's on the motherboard or GPU side?
This may sound strange but it does not matter. Both components seem to be working, the problem most likely is communication. As such, it would not matter which component you change, as long as they are different models. But generally in such situation you would need to try different GPU on your PC. Since we know your GPU works elsewhere this test can be skipped. Other option is trying another motherboard but it is more time consuming (plus is usually harder to obtain mobo for a test).
 

Paperdoc

Polypheme
Ambassador
One other possible way to test something. IF your CPU and mobo include built-in graphics you could go into BIOS Setup and change the configuration to use that on-board system, then SAVE and EXIT. At that point do not let it finish booting - shut down right away. Move the video cable that feeds your monitor to the mobo's rear-panel video output, then reboot. If it boots properly and cleanly every time, you know the video card was your culprit. If the problem persists, just to be sure, shut down and remove the video card completely, then try again. If the problem is gone with no video card in use, you know where the problem is. If the problem persists you can re-install and configure to use the video card, then concentrate on other areas.

There are two very closely related types of issue that might be involved. The POST process involves numerous subsystems that must initiate themselves and then respond to queries from the mobo BIOS (and later from the OS) to confirm that they are working and ready to perform properly. One (maybe more, not commonly) such subsystem can fail to complete its own POST process and cause this total system freeze. But likewise a subsystem that is having some difficulty and takes too long to complete its own POST, leading to a delay in responding to the request for verification, may also cause an apparent failure. Such errors can be caused by real component failure in the subsystem, or by poor contacts in connectors. Examples of subsystems could include the video card, RAM modules, HDD or SSD units, fans, etc. So this issue may or may not be from your video card.
 
Last edited:
May 6, 2022
3
0
10
0
One other possible way to test something. IF your CPU and mobo include built-in graphics you could go into BIOS Setup and change the configuration to use that on-board system, the SAVE and EXIT. At that point do not let it finish booting - shut down right away. Move the video cable that feeds your monitor to the mobo's rear-panel video output, then reboot. If it boots properly and cleanly every time, you know the video card was your culprit. If the problem persists, just to be sure, shut down and remove the video card completely, then try again. If the problem is gone with no video card in use, you know where the problem is. If the problem persists you can re-install and configure to use the video card, then concentrate on other areas.

There are two very closely related types of issue that might be involved. The POST process involves numerous subsystems that must initiate themselves and then respond to queries from the mobo BIOS (and later from the OS) to confirm that they are working and ready to perform properly. One (maybe more, not commonly) such subsystem can fail to complete its own POST process and cause this total system freeze. But likewise a subsystem that is having some difficulty and takes too long to complete its own POST, leading to a delay in responding to the request for verification, may also cause an apparent failure. Such errors can be caused by real component failure in the subsystem, or by poor contacts in connectors. Examples of subsystems could include the video card, RAM modules, HDD or SSD units, fans, etc. So this issue may or may not be from your video card.
I'll try this: thanks!
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY