Question bluescreen after bios update when overclocking

shadowcat777

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Feb 23, 2019
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I have a z370-p motherboard with a i5 8600k cpu and after updating my bios to 2801
when overclocking i get bluescreens. So i have disabled the overclocking process in bios.
I wonder is this normal and can it be a hardware problem or is it simply the bios update ?
the blue screen was= WHEA uncorrectable error & DPC watchdog violation
Kind regards,
//
 

shadowcat777

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Feb 23, 2019
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I went from the last bios version
Specs= PSU Corsair RMX 750X Modular 80 PLUS GOLD V2
i5 8600k. gtx 1070 ti. 32gb ddr4 3200mhz ram.
noctua nh-d15
asus prime z370-p
 

shadowcat777

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Feb 23, 2019
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Do you have a baseline performance bar?
What components are you overclocking? What exactely are you increasing the components to? Are you overvolting too?
Only CPU. i could overclock with previous BIOS version without problem both at v1.335 at 4.8ghz and 5ghz at 1.415v
Now i get blue screen after doing this. I also had passed the Prime95 test for about 1-2 hours and the blue screens are random.
I did not have this problem with my previous bios version.
 
Have you read the release notes for the Bios update?
Many times these updates are just microcode updates to allow for new CPUs. Especially if it's an older board.

It's very possible that running your CPU at high voltage has weakened the CPU. It may just not be able to hit that overclock anymore.
 
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Phaaze88

Polypheme
Ambassador
Sometimes, bios updates BREAK overclocks(settings). That's something you have to take into account.

A couple bios updates ago, I had an Uncore Voltage offset of -0.03v. Updated bios, cleared CMOS - this board automatically does it - went into bios and applied my OC settings from a pendrive, restarted...
It failed to boot, throwing me an orange LED RAM error.
[panik]
Several minutes of applying Vcore, cache, and uncore voltage one at a time, I found that the update 'fixed' the uncore voltage as low as possible already; even when I tried -0.001v, it still failed to post.
So I put the offset to 0.

I think it's back to the drawing board for you; you have to retest everything, since we don't know what the update changed.
But what alceryes said is also legit:
1.415v is a bit excessive on Intel's 14nm chips.
If your LLC setting was crazy high - a common occurrence when folks follow some noob OC guide, or they didn't really read too much into it - then the Vcore was even higher than that.
Since you have an Asus board, they did either Lvls 1 to 7/8. Lvls 4 or 5 should be the max on air cooled VRMs...


I'm getting ahead of myself - it depends on how long you ran with that 5.0ghz at 1.415v setting. So, the bottom line is: OC not stable after bios update.
-current settings no longer stable.
-voltage degradation has reared it's head. That frequency is either no longer possible, or requires you to throw even more voltage at it(not recommended).
One of the above.
 

shadowcat777

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Feb 23, 2019
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OK im atm trying to oc with 4.7ghz at 1.27v and LLC to level 4. wish me good luck.
doing Prime95 stress testing now ^^
are there any other settings i should be doing in the bios?
I am still just a padawan at OC the cpu.
I had help from a friend to OC but we did LLC on level 7.
hopefully the system will be stable at current OC.
 
Last edited:

Phaaze88

Polypheme
Ambassador
Prime95 is NOT a reliable cpu voltage test. It is best used for testing the strength of the cpu cooler. Cinebench R23 would be better for testing Vcore.
It's hard to put the following in my own words, so refer to CompuTronix's Intel Temperature Guide: https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/intel-cpu-temperature-guide-2021.1488337/
As per Intel’s Datasheets, TDP and Thermal Specifications are validated “without AVX. Prime95 with AVX test selections enabled will impose an unrealistic 130% workload which can increase Core temperatures by up to 20°C. To correctly set Prime95 to run your CPU at 100% workload, simply click on the AVX test selections that are not greyed out so that all three AVX boxes are checked, as shown above. Further explanation concerning AVX Instruction Sets are detailed later in this Section.

Utilities that don't overload or underload your processor will give you a valid thermal baseline. Here’s a comparison of utilities grouped as thermal and stability tests according to % of TDP, averaged across six processor Generations at stock Intel settings rounded to the nearest 5%:




Figure 11-2

Although these tests range from 70% to 130% TDP workload, Windows Task Manager interprets every test as 100% CPU Utilization, which is processor resource activity, not %TDP workload. Core temperatures respond directly to Power consumption (Watts), which is driven by workload. Prime95 Small FFTs (AVX disabled) provides the correct workload for testing thermal performance. If Core temperatures don't exceed 80°C, your CPU should run the most demanding real-world workloads without overheating.

Credit goes to CompuTronix for the guide.
 

Neuspeed

Distinguished
Sep 24, 2007
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Updating the BIOS should be limited to trying to resolve an existing issue with the PC. If there are no issues, the BIOS should not be updated. I recommend rolling back to the previous BIOS version you had before.
 

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