[SOLVED] Bluescreen - Memory Management

RaptorXZ

Commendable
Aug 15, 2016
10
1
1,510
0
My nephew's been experiencing blue screen crashes on his custom-built PC. It has been running fine for a long time. This is the most common error that shows up. Temperatures and usage of RAM, CPU and GPU seem to be at nominal levels.



==================================================

Dump File : 062319-11765-01.dmp

Crash Time : 2019-06-23 18:23:09

Bug Check String : MEMORY_MANAGEMENT

Bug Check Code : 0x0000001a

Parameter 1 : 0000000000041792

Parameter 2 : ffffee3f
fdc8a180

Parameter 3 : 0000000000400000

Parameter 4 : 00000000
00000000

Caused By Driver : ntoskrnl.exe

Caused By Address : ntoskrnl.exe+1b3ef0

File Description : NT Kernel & System

Product Name : Microsoft® Windows® Operating System

Company : Microsoft Corporation

File Version : 10.0.17763.557 (WinBuild.160101.0800)

Processor : x64

Crash Address : ntoskrnl.exe+1b3ef0

Stack Address 1 :

Stack Address 2 :

Stack Address 3 :

Computer Name :

Full Path : C:\WINDOWS\Minidump\062319-11765-01.dmp

Processors Count : 6

Major Version : 15

Minor Version : 17763

Dump File Size : 557 916

Dump File Time : 2019-06-23 18:25:12

==================================================
 

jason201

Prominent
Feb 20, 2018
231
8
765
42
Please attach the minidump files, so I could have a more in-depth analysis, I might be able to find something you've missed out on. Apart from that, as the error itself says, there's a strong possibility that this is RAM related. I suggest you check it checked with memtest86:
If errors are found, then you should first verify that the RAM timings/voltage settings in BIOS are set correctly (as in, matching the particular stick's specifications, if you're unsure of what those specifications are, then you're gonna have to remove the stick, inspect it for it's make/model, and then Google it), once you've verified these are set correctly, if there's more than one stick, try testing each of em individually (with the others disconnected) as it's possible only one of em is bad. If there's a single stick however (and it fails the test, despite having the timings/voltage set correctly) then it'd need to be replaced.
 

RaptorXZ

Commendable
Aug 15, 2016
10
1
1,510
0
Thank you for the replies. Unfortunately I can't upload the dump-files, as after we tried using the driver verifier incorporated into Windows 10 and rebooted, it has gotten locked in an auto-repair loop on boot and we can't get access to the OS.
We tried using command prompt and bootrec /fixboot, but to no avail.
We then opted to reinstall Windows with a usb-drive, but at 1% it says it cannot complete, and restarts.
 
Did you perform the driver verifier run after making a system restore to recover from?
the Driver Verifier can create this problem as it is ultimately trying to force the PC to fault.
However that could be more indicative of a hardware error if a clean install is faulting.

What is the full system spec including PSU make and model?
 

RaptorXZ

Commendable
Aug 15, 2016
10
1
1,510
0
A system restore was attempted once the blue screen crashes started, but ended up failing. As there is nothing else on the system disk apart from the OS, I figured if a system restore would be necessary after the Driver Verifier, we might as well just reformat and reinstall Windows, so we did not make another system restore point.

I will ask my nephew for the specs.
 

RaptorXZ

Commendable
Aug 15, 2016
10
1
1,510
0
Motherboard ASUS Z370-F gaming
CPU i5 7600 k
RAM 2x4GB 2400hz DDR4
2 x240 GB SSD
GPU 1070 GTX MSI
Radiator Cooler from Corsair 240mm (2 fans)

Waiting for the PSU specs
 
I will await PSU specs.

Being as we can't get a good understanding of what the BSOD is, and now you are having difficulties with installation. It's more likely a process of eliminating hardware.
Memory Corruption can often be a third party driver, RAM, or your storage drive as your system will recognise some of the storage drive as memory. Being as you can't even install Windows, I would opt for the latter 2.

You'll probably want to remove 1 of the RAM modules and retry an installation, and then repeat with just the other module to ensure that one module isn't faulty.
Running a memtest as stated above would be first port of call for testing RAM, you don't need to boot into Windows for this.
Following that I would try installing a different drive and going through installation again.
Do you know if any overclock was being run?
 

RaptorXZ

Commendable
Aug 15, 2016
10
1
1,510
0
Great advice, thank you! I will suggest that he tries this, he might have gone to sleep for today though as it is nearing midnight where I am. It seems highly plausible that the culprit is one of your suggestions, so we should be able to narrow it down.
I am reasonably sure that everything was set to factory clocks, but I will verify just in case.

I'll report back tomorrow!
 

RaptorXZ

Commendable
Aug 15, 2016
10
1
1,510
0
My nephew opted to order and wait for new RAM. He installed two new sticks and took out the two old ones and Windows booted fine. He's been gaming as usual throughout the day without any crashes. So I feel fairly confident that the issue was defective RAM.

Now I just need to reset the things we were trying before it refused to boot. We did Verifier /reset but no settings were changed, so I guess it was already turned off. And we tried turning off early-boot malware protection when trying to get it to boot, so need to get that reset.

Thank you very much for the help! I'll mark your last reply as best answer. :)
 
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