[SOLVED] Boosting RAM Frequency Using Ryzen DRAM Calculator..?

Aug 14, 2019
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I have been experimenting with the Ryzen DRAM Calculator (ver. 1.6.0.3) over the past week or so, and have been able to successfully tighten all timings on my Flare X 3200 CL14 (2x8) (F4-3200C14D-16GFX) memory kit. However, when I attempt to also use the calculator for boosting DRAM frequency, I've run into a few issues. I have been able to get my system to boot and load Windows 10 after raising the freq. from 3200mhz up to 3400 or 3466mhz and sometimes I can even get through multiple stability tests and benchmarks. But after running the system for an hour or so, I will eventually get a hard reboot (usually when idle) or sometimes a BSoD.

So, I guess my questions are as follows:

1) Can the Ryzen DRAM Calculator even be used to boost frequency? Or is it only intedned for adjusting timings ?

2) If the Calculator can in fact be used to boost frequency, how would this be achieved?

3) Am I doing something wrong in my current method of calculating the timings?

The current method I am using is to simply input all of my system info (i.e. CPU series, Die type, mobo etc.) but instead of selecting "3200" from the Frequency drop-down, I am selecting 3400 or 3466. Then I click R-XMP button to load the XMP information. And finally I click either "Calculate Safe" or "Calculate Fast". I've tried both and seem to be having issues with each.

Any comments, suggestions, etc. would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!

Relevant system specs:

CPU: Ryzen 5 2600X (Not manually overclocked ATM)
RAM: 16gb Flare X 3200 CL14 (2x8)
Mobo: MSI B450 Tomahawk

EDIT: Also, I know this is probably a dumb question, but I have been selecting "Ryzen+" from the Processor Generation tab, as Im assuming this is referring to Zen+ chips (i.e. my 2600X). But is it possible that I should maybe be selecting "Ryzen 2" instead? IDK...just a thought. I'm pretty sure the developer of this app is Russian and Im wondering if maybe there may be a bit of a translation issue in the labels?
 
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It can be used to select timings at a given frequency, assuming you have silicon quality that is capable of it. Both DRAM and CPU have to be up to the task.

Using the calculator you'll enter your memory module characteristics (what kind of DRAM chips are on it, your SPD timings (which are read from SPD by the calculator), etc) and the desired frequency you'd like to be able to operate. Then press the Calculate button...Safe or Fast; extreme is 'in work' on my version.

Print out a screen shot of the first and second pages then go enter ALL the values. Be sure to also use the voltages he recommends, as some DRAM is very sensitive to it. b-die Samsung DRAM, for instance, really needs to have voltage increased to operate stable as you increase frequency.

Be absolutely sure to run a memory test (on the MemBench tab) of all available memory, run it out to 3400% or so (assuming 16Gb total memory). It will take quite a while but that's the only way to have a good idea you're stable.

Steve over at Hardware Unboxed gave a great overview of how to use the tool:
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KOqhyVNPhaM&t=333s
 
Reactions: DUAL33s
Aug 14, 2019
29
9
35
0
It can be used to select timings at a given frequency, assuming you have silicon quality that is capable of it. Both DRAM and CPU have to be up to the task.

Using the calculator you'll enter your memory module characteristics (what kind of DRAM chips are on it, your SPD timings (which are read from SPD by the calculator), etc) and the desired frequency you'd like to be able to operate. Then press the Calculate button...Safe or Fast; extreme is 'in work' on my version.

Print out a screen shot of the first and second pages then go enter ALL the values. Be sure to also use the voltages he recommends, as some DRAM is very sensitive to it. b-die Samsung DRAM, for instance, really needs to have voltage increased to operate stable as you increase frequency.

Be absolutely sure to run a memory test (on the MemBench tab) of all available memory, run it out to 3400% or so (assuming 16Gb total memory). It will take quite a while but that's the only way to have a good idea you're stable.

Steve over at Hardware Unboxed gave a great overview of how to use the tool:
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KOqhyVNPhaM&t=333s
Thank you very much for your response! I've actually managed to stabilize it about an hour ago by adjusting the voltages a bit.

And yes you are 100% correct when you said "Be sure to also use the voltages he recommends, as some DRAM is very sensitive to it. b-die Samsung DRAM, for instance, really needs to have voltage increased to operate stable as you increase frequency."

I am indeed running Samsung b-die and I was not actually running the exact voltages listed in the app. I was running just a little bit lower voltage than recommended and I was also running a CPU Core offset of -0.125. After bumping the DRAM voltage up to 1.36 (from 1.35) and also adjusting the CPU offset to -0.1125, I think I finally stabilized the system. Whether it was the DRAM voltage or the Core offset, I'm still not 100% sure...but either way I've run multiple stability/stress tests and a few benchmarks that have all completed successfully. Only thing left to do is run memtest tonight and cross my fingers lol

Thanks again for the reply. Much appreciated!
 

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