Question Boot Issues And Other Problems After Installing Ryzen 3600

Aug 18, 2019
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So I recently upgraded from a Ryzen 1200 to a Ryzen 3600 and I ran into a problem with my PC booting, My boot drive is a 500 GB Samsung 970 Evo NVME SSD, It used to take about 10 seconds for a cold startup, Now after I hit the power button it takes 30 seconds to show the bios screen then turns off and then turns on again on its own and then takes another 20 or so seconds to finish booting, I also did not have any performance improvement with the upgrade which does not make sense considering everyone else said the 3600 would destroy a 1st gen Ryzen in performance. it seems I have tried just about everything other than reinstalling windows. My other PC components



EVGA 1050ti 4GB



Asus Prime B350 Plus Motherboard



16 GB of Ballistix 2400 MHz (4x4)



1TB Hard Drive (not the boot drive)



Extra Info



Checked that the motherboard was compatible with the new Ryzen chips



I already tried unplugging the ssd and plugging it back in



Have the latest version of the bios



Tried changing various boot settings and options in the bios



Tried reseting CMOS



I have had no luck with any of these.

EDIT: I should also mention that my BIOS does not seem to recognize a drive being in the M2 slot. But in the boot order the Samsung 970 EVO is there, weirdly It only boots with Windows Boot Manager and not just the drive, I do think I had this problem previously but it may not have affected my previous CPU.
 
Last edited:

aocon62

Upstanding
Sep 19, 2018
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Sounds like you might need to nuke windows. If it does not fix it, you have about 3 points of possible conflict:
  1. The cpu
  2. The motherboard
  3. Motherboard Bios
But for now, nuke windows. Back up any data, and that (should) fix her right up.
Edit: What does the bios say? Is it running at default speeds? Is it using proper cores, etc? I had issues with a i5 8400 which was solved in bios.
 

COLGeek

Cybernaut
Moderator
Sounds like you might need to nuke windows. If it does not fix it, you have about 3 points of possible conflict:
  1. The cpu
  2. The motherboard
  3. Motherboard Bios
But for now, nuke windows. Back up any data, and that (should) fix her right up.
Edit: What does the bios say? Is it running at default speeds? Is it using proper cores, etc? I had issues with a i5 8400 which was solved in bios.
You should not have to nuke Windows for just a CPU upgrade. I would suggest we rule out BIOS issues first before doing anything this drastic. Just a suggestion.
 
Aug 18, 2019
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Agreed. Make sure you're on the latest BIOS, make sure your BIOS has XMP enabled(for the performance issues).
I could not find anywhere in my BIOS a setting for XMP, I found this thread on reddit that seemed to be the closest thing to it and did the steps in the thread, but did not seem to make a difference for performance, maybe just slightly. I also am sure I am on the latest BIOS version 5204

The thread I am talking about https://www.reddit.com/r/buildapc/comments/6njrpg View: https://www.reddit.com/r/buildapc/comments/6njrpg/how_to_enable_xmp_profile_in_asus_prime_b350ma/
 
Aug 18, 2019
6
0
10
0
Sounds like you might need to nuke windows. If it does not fix it, you have about 3 points of possible conflict:
  1. The cpu
  2. The motherboard
  3. Motherboard Bios
But for now, nuke windows. Back up any data, and that (should) fix her right up.
Edit: What does the bios say? Is it running at default speeds? Is it using proper cores, etc? I had issues with a i5 8400 which was solved in bios.
It seems to be running at default speeds, I think I will try nuking windows.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Try doing a HARD reset of the BIOS.

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

Also, make sure the first boot device is set to Windows boot manager, not a specific "drive".

And unless you have some older non-UEFI compatible hardware installed, or if your boot drive is configured for an MBR partition type, I would also make sure that you have Windows 8/10 selected under the secure boot settings and that CSM (Compatibility support module) is turned off. If they are already configured that way, then try turning CSM, on. Be sure to always save settings on the exit page before leaving the BIOS.

If none of that works, then I would suggest that you might want to focus narrowly on the memory, because this really sounds like a memory training problem. The fact that you have four memory modules installed means that the advertised guarantee of speed or timings that was intended when two sticks are used, goes out the window. Did you buy all four sticks in one kit, or was it two separate two stick kits?

The fact that it worked previously with your other CPU does not mean that it will with a different CPU installed. You might want to try fiddling around, as mentioned earlier, with the memory XMP settings.

First, make sure your BIOS is set to the advanced mode, NOT the EZ mode. Most settings necessary for tuning and advanced troubleshooting will not be present in the EZ mode view.

Memory settings will be found someplace on the AI Tweaker tab, and you will likely find them under DOCP profile settings, which is ASUS version of XMP.

It might also be worth, if the memory DOCP profile IS set correctly, adding a small amount of DRAM (Memory) voltage since you have four sticks installed. Bumping the DRAM voltage by about .005v-.020v usually does the trick.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
You still may need to do a clean install of Windows at some point, especially if the existing Windows installation has been around a while or has seen multiple major spring/fall updates, but that should really not affect or cause the issues you are seeing during the boot/POST process. Those will almost certainly be memory configuration related.

I would make sure that AFTER you get the memory configured correctly, you turn ON the "memory" specific fast boot settings so it uses those settings EVERY time afterwards, instead of running through the memory training process during every cold or reboot.
 

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