[SOLVED] Both HDMI and DP showing no signal (both GPU and Integrated Graphic) after gotten a new 3080

Apr 11, 2022
2
0
10
0
Hi there, I'm facing the issue of display showing "no signal". Before coming to you, I have read up and tried up almost all the possible solution available on the internet(CMOS BIOS reset, unplugged the power, swapped the cable, cleaned up RAM etc) but non works for me. So to begin with, all my hardware are fairly new, all less than a year old. And it was working just fine in the morning when it was still running on my Zotac 3070, but later in the evening when I traded in the 3070 for 3080, everything just started to falling apart.

You can find all the details of my rig below.

AMD Ryzen™ 5 5600X
ZOTAC RTX 3070 TWIN EDGE 8GB (OC)
GIGABYTE B550M-DS3H
1TB GIGABYTE AORUS Gen4 8GB
32GB KLEVV BOLT XR DDR4 3600
800W FSP HYDRO PRO 80+ Bronze

*GPU replaced with MSI Gaming Z Trio, 10GB which i have just gotten today.

Please if anyone can help me this issue! Thanks in advance.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Did you do a HARD reset, or just a reset, of the BIOS? Did you remember to plug in the required auxiliary power connectors from the PSU to the graphics card? Tried removing the graphics card and seating it again, to make sure it is FULLY seated and that the lock at the end of the PCIe slot is engaged with the cutout on the bottom of the graphics card? Visually verified that there is nothing on your board which is not allowing the new graphics card to be fully seated, because this sometimes happens as well.

Did you buy this card new or used?

If all those are 100% good, then try a hard reset.

BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, IF the problem is related to a lack of video signal, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly at first for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages, then change to HDMI after reconfiguration.

On some systems it may be necessary when you change cards to go into the monitor's own menu system and manually set it to the type of input you are trying to use with it, even if you were using the same one previously.

Trying a different monitor as well, if possible, is also a good idea if there is a lack of display. It happens.
 
Reactions: Dark Lord of Tech

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Did you do a HARD reset, or just a reset, of the BIOS? Did you remember to plug in the required auxiliary power connectors from the PSU to the graphics card? Tried removing the graphics card and seating it again, to make sure it is FULLY seated and that the lock at the end of the PCIe slot is engaged with the cutout on the bottom of the graphics card? Visually verified that there is nothing on your board which is not allowing the new graphics card to be fully seated, because this sometimes happens as well.

Did you buy this card new or used?

If all those are 100% good, then try a hard reset.

BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, IF the problem is related to a lack of video signal, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly at first for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages, then change to HDMI after reconfiguration.

On some systems it may be necessary when you change cards to go into the monitor's own menu system and manually set it to the type of input you are trying to use with it, even if you were using the same one previously.

Trying a different monitor as well, if possible, is also a good idea if there is a lack of display. It happens.
 
Reactions: Dark Lord of Tech
Apr 11, 2022
2
0
10
0
Did you do a HARD reset, or just a reset, of the BIOS? Did you remember to plug in the required auxiliary power connectors from the PSU to the graphics card? Tried removing the graphics card and seating it again, to make sure it is FULLY seated and that the lock at the end of the PCIe slot is engaged with the cutout on the bottom of the graphics card? Visually verified that there is nothing on your board which is not allowing the new graphics card to be fully seated, because this sometimes happens as well.

Did you buy this card new or used?

If all those are 100% good, then try a hard reset.

BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, IF the problem is related to a lack of video signal, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly at first for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages, then change to HDMI after reconfiguration.

On some systems it may be necessary when you change cards to go into the monitor's own menu system and manually set it to the type of input you are trying to use with it, even if you were using the same one previously.

Trying a different monitor as well, if possible, is also a good idea if there is a lack of display. It happens.
Hi there, thanks for the prompt response. I have tried the recommended solution but unfortunately it did not work. After the 5 minutes reset, I was not not directed to the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup . The card is new and it is still under warranty, I'm now wondering could it be DOA, which can be quite rare for new card.
 

lordmogul

Distinguished
Jun 14, 2014
538
29
19,440
192
I would say check of the old card still works to narrow down if it's the new card that has the issue. Or any other card for the matter. Anything really that can give a signal but is not the new 3080. Just to be sure the rest of the parts are all still fine.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY