Question Bottle neck question

PC Tailor

Judicious
Ambassador
Well overall - bottlenecks is an incredibly misused term.

EVERY system has a a limitation, and that limitation moves constantly based on what you are doing and ultimately, there is rarely anything wrong with a bottleneck.

In CPU intensive applications, your CPU will be a limit. In GPU intensive applications, your GPU will be a limit.

There are lots of "bottleneck" calculators online, and I would safely say ignore every one of them. Just research what applications you want to use and then what components serve them best.

For example, if you only plan on gaming at 1080p resolution, then it's usually pretty pointless buying anything above 2060/2070. I always just say be specific in your research and don't trust any "bottleneck" calculators. Every system has one, and it's never the same in all applications.

So to answer your question, it entirely depends on what you are running in what way, at what resolutions, and what you are currently unhappy with about your current performance.
 
Reactions: JitD

mdd1963

Polypheme
In my opinion, the 9100F is to be avoided in gaming, as only 4 threads can struggle to keep minimum frame rates at acceptable levels, regardless of clock speed...

The only 'good 4 core these days seems to be the 3300X, but is 4c/8t ,with eight threads...
 
Sep 21, 2020
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In my opinion, the 9100F is to be avoided in gaming, as only 4 threads can struggle to keep minimum frame rates at acceptable levels, regardless of clock speed...

The only 'good 4 core these days seems to be the 3300X, but is 4c/8t ,with eight threads...
but its not regionally available right now any other processor
 
Sep 21, 2020
51
3
35
0
Well overall - bottlenecks is an incredibly misused term.

EVERY system has a a limitation, and that limitation moves constantly based on what you are doing and ultimately, there is rarely anything wrong with a bottleneck.

In CPU intensive applications, your CPU will be a limit. In GPU intensive applications, your GPU will be a limit.

There are lots of "bottleneck" calculators online, and I would safely say ignore every one of them. Just research what applications you want to use and then what components serve them best.

For example, if you only plan on gaming at 1080p resolution, then it's usually pretty pointless buying anything above 2060/2070. I always just say be specific in your research and don't trust any "bottleneck" calculators. Every system has one, and it's never the same in all applications.

So to answer your question, it entirely depends on what you are running in what way, at what resolutions, and what you are currently unhappy with about your current performance.
i was thinking of spending more on gpu as i usually game on heavy titles that's why i was asking can you suggest something
 

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