[SOLVED] Bottleneck issues with new Cards

NeilDaMassTyson

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Oct 20, 2020
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Hello, I am still relatively new to the PC world. I am looking to upgrade my GPU and am looking at either the 3060 TI or the 3070. From the research I have done, it seems that the 3060TI would be about what I need and that the small boost in performance with the 3070 isnt worth the additional 100 dollars. My questions is this, if I were to upgrade to either the 3060 TI or the 3070 whenever they become available again, would I run into any bottlenecking issues or PSU issues? I have a build with the following specs.

-CPU: AMD AMD RYZEN 5 2600 WRAITHS
-MOBO: GIGABYTE X470 AORUS GAMING 7
-GPU:MSI RX-580 ARMOR 8GB OC
-SSD: INLAND 1TB I PREMIUM NVME SSD
-PSU: SEASONIC M12II 620W 80+B PSU
-RAM: GSKILL 8GB 1X8 D4 2666 RIPJAWS

 
Your big issue is the single channel moderately slow RAM. This is a significant problem and needs upgrading before the GPU.

What resolution are you gaming at? If 1080p you will loose some fps due to the cpu but not enough to be an issue. However that is assuming you fix the RAM.
He will be fine,even at 1080p r5 2600 is strong enough to produce 60fps+ high settings on every game with 3060Ti.I agree on the ram thing,8gb (especially single channel) is not a good thing.
 
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Your big issue is the single channel moderately slow RAM. This is a significant problem and needs upgrading before the GPU.

What resolution are you gaming at? If 1080p you will loose some fps due to the cpu but not enough to be an issue. However that is assuming you fix the RAM.
 
Reactions: spentshells
Your big issue is the single channel moderately slow RAM. This is a significant problem and needs upgrading before the GPU.

What resolution are you gaming at? If 1080p you will loose some fps due to the cpu but not enough to be an issue. However that is assuming you fix the RAM.
He will be fine,even at 1080p r5 2600 is strong enough to produce 60fps+ high settings on every game with 3060Ti.I agree on the ram thing,8gb (especially single channel) is not a good thing.
 
Reactions: spentshells
He will be fine,even at 1080p r5 2600 is strong enough to produce 60fps+ high settings on every game with 3060Ti.I agree on the ram thing,8gb (especially single channel) is not a good thing.
I didn’t say there would be a problem but a 2600 isn’t going to push out as many FPS at 1080p as a stronger cpu. It’s more about managing expectations than there being a problem.
 
Reactions: Master Djoza

RTX 2080

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2666 MHz is a slow RAM speed for Ryzen CPUs and will cause your CPUs infinity fabric clock to be slow, slowing down your CPU and leaving your 3060 Ti underutilized. If you end up with disappointing results with a 3060 Ti, you'll want RAM that can run at at least 3200 MHz, ideally 3600 MHz.
 

Karadjgne

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No. OP has a 2000 series Ryzen. 3200MHz is maximum as infinity fabric will switch from a 1:1 ratio to a 2:1 ratio at 3433MHz. 3600/16 would trail a 3200/16 in fps count.

2666MHz isn't that slow. There's @ a 20% performance difference between 2133 and 3200MHz, so 2666 falls right in the middle, and no its not 10% fps, it's 10% ram performance which can mean a lot of fps or very little to no fps, depending on the game. For many games figure on closer to 3-5fps difference between 2666 and 3200MHz. Chump change that's not really visible, or missed except in a benchmark.

While most games are steadily climbing in cpu intensity, gpu is going in spurts. Some games have become overboard demanding, the old Standby workhorse gtx970 is now a joke, and some games are not much more demanding than CSGO.

Putting a 3060ti in very good position for top end 1080p, 3070 for 1440p, 3080 for 4k. Moving up a grade just means the card may or may not last a few years worth of new games longer, that's the gamble, but it won't improve the quality of the picture and either card will still be good enough to cover minimum frame rates above monitor refresh, making maximum frames a moot point.

Throw the concept of 'bottleneck' out the window, it's useless. Doesn't matter if today's games under utilize the gpu, chances are very good that tomorrow's games will not. And it's the game code itself that determines whether a gpu is strong enough or not, not the cpu.
 
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No. OP has a 2000 series Ryzen. 3200MHz is maximum as infinity fabric will switch from a 1:1 ratio to a 2:1 ratio at 3433MHz. 3600/16 would trail a 3200/16 in fps count.

2666MHz isn't that slow. There's @ a 20% performance difference between 2133 and 3200MHz, so 2666 falls right in the middle, and no its not 10% fps, it's 10% ram performance which can mean a lot of fps or very little to no fps, depending on the game. For many games figure on closer to 3-5fps difference between 2666 and 3200MHz. Chump change that's not really visible, or missed except in a benchmark.

While most games are steadily climbing in cpu intensity, gpu is going in spurts. Some games have become overboard demanding, the old Standby workhorse gtx970 is now a joke, and some games are not much more demanding than CSGO.

Putting a 3060ti in very good position for top end 1080p, 3070 for 1440p, 3080 for 4k. Moving up a grade just means the card may or may not last a few years worth of new games longer, that's the gamble, but it won't improve the quality of the picture and either card will still be good enough to cover minimum frame rates above monitor refresh, making maximum frames a moot point.

Throw the concept of 'bottleneck' out the window, it's useless. Doesn't matter if today's games under utilize the gpu, chances are very good that tomorrow's games will not. And it's the game code itself that determines whether a gpu is strong enough or not, not the cpu.
What about ram speeds on intel's budget side?
Specifically talking about 10100f,since i can grab patriot viper 2x8gb 3000mhz for 60$.
 

Karadjgne

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Intels treat ram as cache storage. For most things the ram can move the data faster than the cpu can use it, so going too fast has diminishing returns for value. But there are some things that use ram effectively, like flight simulator and a few games and some production software, so that's a consideration too.
 
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Intels treat ram as cache storage. For most things the ram can move the data faster than the cpu can use it, so going too fast has diminishing returns for value. But there are some things that use ram effectively, like flight simulator and a few games and some production software, so that's a consideration too.
So you would say its not worth chasing speed (mhz) as you dont get that much of a benefit as you paid for.Thx
 

Karadjgne

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Yes. With Intels, unless you have a very good reason for needing something like 3600MHz or higher, there's no real justification to spending out the money. Locked Intel only use 2400/2666MHz and K cpus don't see justifiable benefits over 3200MHz.

If all you are doing is running down the street, a $50 pair of tennis shoes will be just as good as a $1200 pair of Olympic sprinter shoes.
 
Reactions: Master Djoza
Yes. With Intels, unless you have a very good reason for needing something like 3600MHz or higher, there's no real justification to spending out the money. Locked Intel only use 2400/2666MHz and K cpus don't see justifiable benefits over 3200MHz.

If all you are doing is running down the street, a $50 pair of tennis shoes will be just as good as a $1200 pair of Olympic sprinter shoes.
Will i have any problems running ram on less speed than its advertised.The ram i want is 3000mhz.Im quessing it will be 2133 until i turn XMP on in BIOS.
 

Karadjgne

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Xmp is eXtreme Memory Profile. It's an automatic setting of certain values, depending on the profile. Most ram only has #1, so you'll run default speeds/voltage until you manually allow the XMP. It's considered an Overclock, which is one reason you'll see 2133/2400/2666/2933(oc)/3200(oc) etc. The cpu will determine the base speed.

All those values come from the jedec tables you can see using the spd tab in cpu-z and other ram accounting software.

Some boards do not have the correct multipliers for 3000MHz, it's an oddball number, 2933MHz is accepted by all. If you want to run the ram at other than the base speeds or xmp value, you'll need to do so manually, setting the speed and voltage. If it's a jedec table speed, the ram will supply the timings.
 
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