[SOLVED] Bought a 3600XT... It runs at 50°c idle and spikes to 65°c every few seconds...

irsaxu

Prominent
Nov 22, 2018
20
0
510
0
So I've been having some serious problems with my new CPU. I got it 3 days ago, and ever since then (and before I had installed any software) it was running very warm at idle, and the fan was going crazy, constantly speeding up and slowing down. I took a look at the temperatures, and basically, what's happening is this: the core clock is jumping to 4.5Ghz every 10-20 seconds, then dropping back to 3.5-36. The temperature hits 65°c when it's at 4.5Ghz, and drops to 50°c at the lower speed. Now, just to be clear - this is happening when IDLE - under around 1-4% load. It just doesn't make any sense to me.



I've looked around online for answers, and I've found a lot of people with the same problem, but no answers. A lot of people gave up, saying either that "that's just how the CPU works" or buying a quieter fan so they don't notice the temp jumps, and the sound of the fan starting up that comes with it. But I don't want this to keep happening.
 

gingerrankin

Estimable
Apr 3, 2018
780
19
2,815
215
Hello,
This is a common problem or characteristic of the Ryzen 3000, due to the architecture of the same. I tell you about my experiences with my ryzen 7 3800x.
First of all, you need to rule out problems with cooling. For this, you must pass a stress process (prime95, cinebench ...). If it does not exceed 85ºC there is no problem with your cooler.
There are various procedures that serve to partially mitigate this behavior, but none fully resolve it. If you really want a quiet CPU you should look to Intel.
Not all cores in a Ryzen 3000 have the same quality. There is only one that achieves the maximum frequency promised by AMD. In light tasks, windows try to squeeze the preferred core to the maximum, even if this means raising the temperature momentarily. This does not endanger your CPU.
You should avoid the “observer effect”. Many monitoring tools stress the CPU themselves. You must use to monitor Ryzen Master or a tool adapted to Ryzen 3000 operation (such as HWinfo64 with 2000 millisecond refresh option). In no case should you use more than one tool at a time. Attention to the bloatware on your motherboard!
Adapt the CPU fan curve so that it is flat up to say around 65ºC with an acceptable value for you (for example 40%). The exact value depends on the quality of the CPU fan, so a better cooler will help. From 65ºC up to the maximum.
Update the latest version of the BIOS for your motherboard, AMD chipset and Windows. With the latest versions of the AMD chipset, special Ryzen power plans will appear to improve this aspect.
Additionally, a user has created a power plan "sz Ryzen Balanced V4" that promises lowers the temperature without affecting performance. You can search for information on the internet.
Using undervolting (negative offset) in stock does not usually help. Some users indicate that with manual OC + undervolting can help, but I have not verified it.
I hope I've been helpful.
Regards!
 

EridanusSV

Upstanding
Aug 16, 2020
343
43
220
4
Make sure there's enough thermal paste. Ryzen CPUs are much bigger than Intel's and sometimes spreading it around helps. If you don't want to spread it; do the X method instead of pea/dot.
 
Hi Irsaxu.

I see this kind of post a lot of time in this forum.

This is totally normal for a Ryzen CPU to work this way. What you describe as your temperature hitting 65C when idle is because of the CPU cores sleeping. The moment you open something or do a small task some of the cores wake up and spike in temperature. That's normal behavior for a Ryzen CPU.

Now I understand that the fan going up and down is annoying and I had the same issue when I built my 3900X but the solution is easy. You change the fan curve of the CPU/System. You put it quiet under the temperature your CPU is spiking to while at idle. So let's say you see 65C at idle maximum. You put your fan curve to be agressive over 65C. So like that your system should stay quiet when at idle and only rev up when you're over 65C in a game or something.

The spiking temperature to 60-65C will never stop. Everyone with a Ryzen CPU has this.

If you want cooler temp at idle buy a better CPU cooler. My 3900X is idling at 33C and spike to 60C while at idle. Stays at 70C at full load.
 

irsaxu

Prominent
Nov 22, 2018
20
0
510
0
Make sure there's enough thermal paste. Ryzen CPUs are much bigger than Intel's and sometimes spreading it around helps. If you don't want to spread it; do the X method instead of pea/dot.
I just used the paste that was already on the cooler, so I don't see how there could be an issue with that. Besides, what could that have to do with periodic and regular temperature spikes? It happens routinely every 10-20 seconds.
 

irsaxu

Prominent
Nov 22, 2018
20
0
510
0
Hi Irsaxu.

I see this kind of post a lot of time in this forum.

This is totally normal for a Ryzen CPU to work this way. What you describe as your temperature hitting 65C when idle is because of the CPU cores sleeping. The moment you open something or do a small task some of the cores wake up and spike in temperature. That's normal behavior for a Ryzen CPU.

Now I understand that the fan going up and down is annoying and I had the same issue when I built my 3900X but the solution is easy. You change the fan curve of the CPU/System. You put it quiet under the temperature your CPU is spiking to while at idle. So let's say you see 65C at idle maximum. You put your fan curve to be agressive over 65C. So like that your system should stay quiet when at idle and only rev up when you're over 65C in a game or something.
I've tried adjusting the fan curve, and while that does counter the noise problem, I thought it would be sensible to ask because 50°c is not a normal idle CPU temperature, as far as I know.

I appreciate that that might be how the CPU functions, with the temp spikes and all, but is it really okay that my CPU is running at 50°c idle? My last one sat at a steady 32.
 
I've tried adjusting the fan curve, and while that does counter the noise problem, I thought it would be sensible to ask because 50°c is not a normal idle CPU temperature, as far as I know.

I appreciate that that might be how the CPU functions, with the temp spikes and all, but is it really okay that my CPU is running at 50°c idle? My last one sat at a steady 32.
Your last one was an Intel or AMD? That Idle temp is normal with the stock cooler. Don't worry. 50C is not hot. If the CPU stays under 80C you're fine.
 

irsaxu

Prominent
Nov 22, 2018
20
0
510
0
Your last one was an Intel or AMD? That Idle temp is normal with the stock cooler. Don't worry. 50C is not hot. If the CPU stays under 80C you're fine.
My last one was an Intel i5 4690k with the stock cooler.

Are these spikes how all AMD CPUs run then? My friend has a 2600 and his doesn't do this at all.

Anyway, thank you for your fast replies. I've been worrying about this for a while, so it's nice to have someone to talk to directly about it. I'm just worried since I know that heat is essentially the #1 thing that degrades a CPU.
 

mdd1963

Polypheme
Spiking from 50C to 65C in lock step with clock speeds ramping up to 3.9-4.1 GHz on one or more cores to accomplish any of the plethora of background Windows tasks (updates, file indexing, app updates, cloud storage sync, etc., are not high CPU load tasks, so % of CPU busy may not spike much at all) is not really a cause for concern, IMO; in fact, relatively normal behavior for Intel and AMD CPUs for several years..(my own 7700K bounces from as low as 800 MHz to 4700 MHz* and anywhere in between on all four cores several times per second..(MCE with XTU tweaks)
 

alexbirdie

Proper
Feb 20, 2020
243
46
140
7
Check taskmanager, what's using CPU and causes the spikes.

Try undervolting in BIOS. negative offset, start with -0.1 volt, if stable, keep it,otherwise try -0.075).
 
Last edited:

kurdtnz

Prominent
Feb 24, 2020
884
130
590
15
Just 'echoing' what others have said about it being totally normal with ryzen's. What cooler are you using? I have the 3600x and i use a wraith prism, the constant ramping up and down drives me crazy as the cooler is very loud when doing this.The only way to combat it without having a drop in performance by changing the power management levels is by buying a decent after market cooler.
 

irsaxu

Prominent
Nov 22, 2018
20
0
510
0
Just 'echoing' what others have said about it being totally normal with ryzen's. What cooler are you using? I have the 3600x and i use a wraith prism, the constant ramping up and down drives me crazy as the cooler is very loud when doing this.The only way to combat it without having a drop in performance by changing the power management levels is by buying a decent after market cooler.
I currently use the stock cooler, and I've bought an after market one to do with the noise. Anyway, thanks for your info. I guess I have nothing to worry about :)
 

Avro Arrow

Distinguished
So I've been having some serious problems with my new CPU. I got it 3 days ago, and ever since then (and before I had installed any software) it was running very warm at idle, and the fan was going crazy, constantly speeding up and slowing down. I took a look at the temperatures, and basically, what's happening is this: the core clock is jumping to 4.5Ghz every 10-20 seconds, then dropping back to 3.5-36. The temperature hits 65°c when it's at 4.5Ghz, and drops to 50°c at the lower speed. Now, just to be clear - this is happening when IDLE - under around 1-4% load. It just doesn't make any sense to me.

I've looked around online for answers, and I've found a lot of people with the same problem, but no answers. A lot of people gave up, saying either that "that's just how the CPU works" or buying a quieter fan so they don't notice the temp jumps, and the sound of the fan starting up that comes with it. But I don't want this to keep happening.
Ok, since you're new to owning an AMD CPU, there might be something that you haven't considered. Ryzen CPUs and chipsets use a driver set from AMD to regulate several things, power use being one of them. If you haven't installed the newest chipset driver (which came out in July of this year) then the power use of the CPU might not be properly regulated. Use this link and select "Chipsets" from the menu. Then select "AM4" and then whatever your motherboard's chipset is. You'll get a link to download a driver set. Install that and see if it helps:
https://www.amd.com/en/support
I'd have given you a direct link but you neglected to say what motherboard you're using so I don't know what chipset it is. In any case, it's not hard to find.
 
Last edited:

gingerrankin

Estimable
Apr 3, 2018
780
19
2,815
215
Hello,
This is a common problem or characteristic of the Ryzen 3000, due to the architecture of the same. I tell you about my experiences with my ryzen 7 3800x.
First of all, you need to rule out problems with cooling. For this, you must pass a stress process (prime95, cinebench ...). If it does not exceed 85ºC there is no problem with your cooler.
There are various procedures that serve to partially mitigate this behavior, but none fully resolve it. If you really want a quiet CPU you should look to Intel.
Not all cores in a Ryzen 3000 have the same quality. There is only one that achieves the maximum frequency promised by AMD. In light tasks, windows try to squeeze the preferred core to the maximum, even if this means raising the temperature momentarily. This does not endanger your CPU.
You should avoid the “observer effect”. Many monitoring tools stress the CPU themselves. You must use to monitor Ryzen Master or a tool adapted to Ryzen 3000 operation (such as HWinfo64 with 2000 millisecond refresh option). In no case should you use more than one tool at a time. Attention to the bloatware on your motherboard!
Adapt the CPU fan curve so that it is flat up to say around 65ºC with an acceptable value for you (for example 40%). The exact value depends on the quality of the CPU fan, so a better cooler will help. From 65ºC up to the maximum.
Update the latest version of the BIOS for your motherboard, AMD chipset and Windows. With the latest versions of the AMD chipset, special Ryzen power plans will appear to improve this aspect.
Additionally, a user has created a power plan "sz Ryzen Balanced V4" that promises lowers the temperature without affecting performance. You can search for information on the internet.
Using undervolting (negative offset) in stock does not usually help. Some users indicate that with manual OC + undervolting can help, but I have not verified it.
I hope I've been helpful.
Regards!
 

irsaxu

Prominent
Nov 22, 2018
20
0
510
0
Ok, since you're new to owning an AMD CPU, there might be something that you haven't considered. Ryzen CPUs and chipsets use a driver set from AMD to regulate several things, power use being one of them. If you haven't installed the newest chipset driver (which came out in July of this year) then the power use of the CPU might not be properly regulated. Use this link and select "Chipsets" from the menu. Then select "AM4" and then whatever your motherboard's chipset is. You'll get a link to download a driver set. Install that and see if it helps:
https://www.amd.com/en/support
I'd have given you a direct link but you neglected to say what motherboard you're using so I don't know what chipset it is. In any case, it's not hard to find.
I had already updated the Chipsets about an hour before making the thread.

Also, I have had an AMD CPU before, and it didn't behave like this. So I was just surprised; but it turns out it's just the Zen 2 CPUs

Hello,
This is a common problem or characteristic of the Ryzen 3000, due to the architecture of the same. I tell you about my experiences with my ryzen 7 3800x.
First of all, you need to rule out problems with cooling. For this, you must pass a stress process (prime95, cinebench ...). If it does not exceed 85ºC there is no problem with your cooler.
There are various procedures that serve to partially mitigate this behavior, but none fully resolve it. If you really want a quiet CPU you should look to Intel.
Not all cores in a Ryzen 3000 have the same quality. There is only one that achieves the maximum frequency promised by AMD. In light tasks, windows try to squeeze the preferred core to the maximum, even if this means raising the temperature momentarily. This does not endanger your CPU.
You should avoid the “observer effect”. Many monitoring tools stress the CPU themselves. You must use to monitor Ryzen Master or a tool adapted to Ryzen 3000 operation (such as HWinfo64 with 2000 millisecond refresh option). In no case should you use more than one tool at a time. Attention to the bloatware on your motherboard!
Adapt the CPU fan curve so that it is flat up to say around 65ºC with an acceptable value for you (for example 40%). The exact value depends on the quality of the CPU fan, so a better cooler will help. From 65ºC up to the maximum.
Update the latest version of the BIOS for your motherboard, AMD chipset and Windows. With the latest versions of the AMD chipset, special Ryzen power plans will appear to improve this aspect.
Additionally, a user has created a power plan "sz Ryzen Balanced V4" that promises lowers the temperature without affecting performance. You can search for information on the internet.
Using undervolting (negative offset) in stock does not usually help. Some users indicate that with manual OC + undervolting can help, but I have not verified it.
I hope I've been helpful.
Regards!
Thanks a lot!!! I'm glad there are such helpful people online.
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
What are you using to track temps? HWINFO shows my CPU sensor as a constantly moving target between 44 and 60C whereas Ryzen master shows it as a range between 39 & 43C

Windows 10 has no idea how fast your CPU is going right now, the 3600XT is too new for it to be accurate, previous Ryzen CPU had same problems until very recent


CPU can't be doing 4ghz and 900mhz at same time.

Just ignore windows until its more realistic. That is my PC above.
 
Yes Zen 2 does fluctuate clockspeed a lot more than any of the zen or zen+ CPUs I have used.

I could see how this is an issue with stock cooler.

I run a Ryzen 5 3600 with a Arctic Freezer 34 Esports one. It runs cool and quiet at idle without the fan even needing to spin at all. Usually just sits around 4.2ghz in windows performance mode.
 

kurdtnz

Prominent
Feb 24, 2020
884
130
590
15
Yes Zen 2 does fluctuate clockspeed a lot more than any of the zen or zen+ CPUs I have used.

I could see how this is an issue with stock cooler.

I run a Ryzen 5 3600 with a Arctic Freezer 34 Esports one. It runs cool and quiet at idle without the fan even needing to spin at all. Usually just sits around 4.2ghz in windows performance mode.
Any reason why you use the windows performance mode over the amd modes?
 
Reactions: drea.drechsler
So I've been having some serious problems with my new CPU.
...
You've got zero problems with your CPU, only problems with interpreting the temperature data.

Ryzen 3000 boosts individual cores all the way to max clock from idle very frequently to process transient tasks. The processor also has dozens of temp sensors scattered all over the die and reports out the highest one at any given moment. The boosts from idle cause really high, very short duration and highly localized temp spikes. Being so short and highly distributed they don't really add much to the thermal state of the CPU.

Ryzenmaster, and HWinfo if you look at the right reading, report a RUNNING AVERAGE temperature that more closely reflects the true thermal state. The problem is that BIOS is dumb and only sees the instantaneous sensors so it will spike fans with those short temp spikes.

Ryzen is also perfectly OK running up around 85-90C under really heavy loads, although it starts pulling boost clocks above 80C. So the way to eliminate fan pulsing is to set a low, inaudible, and FLAT base fan speed profile up to 65-70C then start ramping from there. Don't let it get really loud until 80-85C, max speed not before the 90-95 range.
 
Last edited:

irsaxu

Prominent
Nov 22, 2018
20
0
510
0
You've got zero problems with your CPU, only problems with interpreting the temperature data.

Ryzen 3000 boosts individual cores all the way to max clock from idle very frequently to process transient tasks. The processor also has dozens of temp sensors scattered all over the die and reports out the highest one at any given moment. The boosts from idle cause really high, very short duration and highly localized temp spikes. Being so short and highly distributed they don't really add much to the thermal state of the CPU.

Ryzenmaster, and HWinfo if you look at the right reading, report a RUNNING AVERAGE temperature that more closely reflects the true thermal state. The problem is that BIOS is dumb and only sees the instantaneous sensors so it will spike fans with those short temp spikes.

Ryzen is also perfectly OK running up around 85-90C under really heavy loads, although it starts pulling boost clocks above 80C. So the way to eliminate fan pulsing is to set a low, inaudible, and FLAT base fan speed profile up to 65-70C then start ramping from there. Don't let it get really loud until 80-85C, max speed not before the 90-95 range.
I think you're right. I got Ryzen Master like everyone said, and it seems it was actually HWInfo that was somewhat inaccurate. I also tried that fan curve even before you said it, and it's perfect. That said, I will still get an aftermarket cooler
 
I think you're right. I got Ryzen Master like everyone said, and it seems it was actually HWInfo that was somewhat inaccurate. I also tried that fan curve even before you said it, and it's perfect. That said, I will still get an aftermarket cooler
In HWInfo look for a sensor reading called "CPU Die (average)"; that's their everaging readout. It will differ a bit from RyzenMaster because the averaging algorithm RM uses isn't known so Martin (the HWInfo developer) can't duplicate it precisely. Precision goes out the window when dealing with calculated readings anyway, but at least they track together and aren't far different.
 
Feb 19, 2020
7
0
10
0
Easy way to test this btw , I had same issue on 2700 non x and now the 3600x . Same mobo etc . Anyway if you est the polling rate in hw info to 50ms ...then pop after burner up ... use afterburner to graph out hwinfo's sensors pick CPU die average /CPU / CCD 1 tdie set Afterburner to 50ms as wel ...you'll notice MAGICALLY your temps will go flat almost instantly. Granted U shouldn't game or do much beyond the ocassional Log to test your cooling system with this setting as it que's your system that much faster and hence could eat cpu time ( not could will) . But the spike hi/low behavior fades out . the monitoring software is attempting to read 12 threads and at least 6 different temps and give you a single # over a 1000/5000ms period whatever defaulti s ...this results in an inaccurate reading and "herky jerky " type behavior. It simply isn't whats actually going on. DECREASING the polling period will give u the most accurate reading ...not the otherway around.

So no at least with Ryzen 3000 , this is not normal behavior ...its simply fake news if u know the cooler u have should be at steady state after a certain period of time and u still get his spikey behavior at idle ...its more than likely just fake news over an inaccurate monitor or (overtaxed") monitoring software. yea it will still fluctuate as even at 50ms polling its still giving you 1 # to represent 6 different actual sensors. Before someone that was on the "+30C spikes in temp every few secs is normal" Train tells me I shouldn't run monitoring software at that polling rate ...Yes as mentioned earlier I understand that but for clearing up the (this is in fact not normal n makes little sense) issue ...as Sure In the larger Nodes Zen + and Original Zen with both being fairly new creations we could write this off to 1 core having a 10 watts slammed thru it to hit boost outta no where then dropping back to zero or "boost behavior" but at this point we know better ...as im sure u all have ..Ive tried all core overclocks for giggles and Multi thread benchmark runs /cooler testing ..and locking the Multiplier to a static metric along with Voltage as best ya can and disabling spread spectrum to the extent you are allowed... polling on monitoring software left at defaultv values still gives spikey temp readings which negates the "its just boost / normal behavior" its not ... the whole time it was infact us misreading the information we were presented ...but not in the sense that "oh this is normal np" ... its more like "oh this isn't accurate" .
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS