Breaking: Apple Files Touchscreen Mouse Patent

Status
Not open for further replies.

mister g

Distinguished
Mar 6, 2010
1,469
0
19,360
47
Just thinking, the patent office has a backlog of several years so when you apply for a patent it could be several years before it's approved. So is the article saying that they just filed one or had it been given to them after several years of processing?
 

dman3k

Distinguished
Apr 28, 2009
715
0
18,980
0
basically, apple took another invention and applied a few more words to the end of the patent to create a new patent... apple now patented a touchscreen "on a mouse"... numpad "on a mouse"... phone "on a mouse".
 

notanakin

Distinguished
Jul 8, 2008
10
0
18,510
0
Well, I suppose this is a step up for a company that sells a one-button mouse that needs workarounds to get a right-click.
 

NovemberWind

Distinguished
Nov 9, 2006
25
0
18,530
0
Wait a sec... So Apple needed a patent and many impractical (my opinion, based on the picture) additional buttons before they were willing to consider more than a single button for their mouse? How very... Apple.
 

djmcg

Distinguished
Jan 20, 2011
1
0
18,510
0
That's an interesting idea. Part of the article is misleading though. Apple is upping Microsofts mouse, but Microsoft's Arc Touch Mouse was just upping Apple's Magic Mouse with the additional feature of flexible curving. It was Apple that came up with the touch sensitive mouse idea. The article leads one to imply otherwise.
 
G

Guest

Guest
@notanakin: Considering every mouse they [Apple] currently sell has the ability to right-click, that's not exactly something new to apple. But thanks for giving your opinion without using one!
@dman3k: Ivention, not really. Innovation, definitley. If I can have my phone on a dock as I sit at my desk, and place a call without taking it off the dock, it really is more intuitive. Keep it up, Apple.
By the way, I'm not some Apple fanboy; but when you can simplify such a task and simplify lives in the process, then I'll promote your products too.
 

XD_dued

Distinguished
Dec 23, 2008
415
0
18,810
6
seems useless to me with your hand on top of the screen. I'm against apple, but I'm also against microsoft. Unfortunately, these silly gimmicks manage to attract the masses and create profits.
 

husker

Distinguished
Oct 2, 2009
946
17
18,985
0
Slapping 2 existing technologies together is not innovation, nor is it worth a patent. True innovation is inventing the mouse, or the touchscreen. Putting them together is just feeding off the crumbs of other people's greatness.
 

jimmysmitty

Champion
Moderator
Not sure how this would work. I mean with a mouse, you move it around on a small area so the laser feeds DPI data back to the computer and therefore moves the mouse with your movements.

This will do something but I can't see it for more than just a gimmick really.
 

enforcer22

Distinguished
Sep 10, 2006
1,692
0
19,790
1
QUOTE but even the most emotional Apple-haters among us have to admit that some of the best ideas for future computing devices come out of Apple's labs..



Like??
 

cookoy

Distinguished
Aug 3, 2009
1,324
0
19,280
0
my current optical mouse is just fine. i'll wait a couple of years for prices to come down and have a look at it, if the public accepts it.
 

Netherscourge

Distinguished
May 26, 2009
390
0
18,780
0
I thought the purpose of a touch screen was to remove the need for a mouse/keyboard accessory in the first place?

Now they want to put a touch-screen ON a mouse? Why? Why would you need or want that?

Why not put a touch screen on my car's dashboard so I can operate all my car's stuff without turning knobs and pressing buttons? I'd prefer that over a touch-screen mouse.
 

malikxaxu

Distinguished
Aug 30, 2010
20
0
18,510
0
[citation][nom]mister g[/nom]Just thinking, the patent office has a backlog of several years so when you apply for a patent it could be several years before it's approved. So is the article saying that they just filed one or had it been given to them after several years of processing?[/citation]

The Patent application was published on 2009. This means it was probably filed around 2007-2008. It should not be until a few years before we know if they can obtain allowance of the patent.

[citation][nom]husker[/nom]Slapping 2 existing technologies together is not innovation, nor is it worth a patent. True innovation is inventing the mouse, or the touchscreen. Putting them together is just feeding off the crumbs of other people's greatness.[/citation]

True. If indeed this is the case where it is two known techs that are put together and the effect of the combination is nothing more than the sum of each tech, without further "synergy", then it is an aggregation which is not patentable under Section 35. USC 103.


Cheers
 

hellwig

Distinguished
May 29, 2008
1,743
0
19,860
26
Correct me if I'm wrong, but someone already did this, did they not? I could have sworn I'd seen at least a concept model (using OLED or maybe eInk) that had a touchscreen in the mouse that allowed it to be configurable or display status or something. Looks like Apple saw the same article, this is why first-to-invent is much better than a first-to-file system (and also explains why slow-moving dinosaurs like Microsoft want first-to-file).

[citation][nom]EnFoRceR22[/nom]QUOTE but even the most emotional Apple-haters among us have to admit that some of the best ideas for future computing devices come out of Apple's labs..Like??[/citation]
Hmm.. Firewire, which they then discontinued. Umm... Multitouch (supposedly). Err... yeah, I got nothing else.
 

malikxaxu

Distinguished
Aug 30, 2010
20
0
18,510
0
[citation][nom]hellwig[/nom]Correct me if I'm wrong, but someone already did this, did they not? I could have sworn I'd seen at least a concept model (using OLED or maybe eInk) that had a touchscreen in the mouse that allowed it to be configurable or display status or something. Looks like Apple saw the same article, this is why first-to-invent is much better than a first-to-file system (and also explains why slow-moving dinosaurs like Microsoft want first-to-file).
Hmm.. Firewire, which they then discontinued. Umm... Multitouch (supposedly). Err... yeah, I got nothing else.[/citation]

I disagree with your statement regarding first-to-invent vs. first-to-file. If indeed there was such an article outhere, and it was published BEFORE filing of Apple's patent application, then it is prior art which can bar Apple from obtaining the patent, regardless of whether it is a first-to-file or first-to-invent patent system.

First-to-invent is cumbersome in that it requires affidavits and swearing behind a reference to effectively establish that a given party invented before another one.

In fact, there is room to argue that a first-to-invent system does not go along the intent for patent protection; provide an incentive for innovators to share innovation (through publication of patent) provided they obtain a limited exclusivity - insofar as this sharing is done asap so that others may benefit from such knowledge asap.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS