Question Broken capacitor on mobo

Jul 21, 2021
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So I somehow managed to knock a capacitor off my motherboard near the CPU socket when I was reinstalling my CPU cooler. My motherboard is a Gigabyte B365M DS3H Wifi. I know that I can replace the capacitor and nothing around it seems broken I am just having problems locating a replacement capacitor.

This is what the capacitor says on it

FP5K
048h
5 6 1
6.3

I figured 6.3 meant the voltage.

But if anyone could possibly help me find a replacement for this capacitor I would be extremely greatfull thanks in advance!
 
So I somehow managed to knock a capacitor off my motherboard near the CPU socket when I was reinstalling my CPU cooler. My motherboard is a Gigabyte B365M DS3H Wifi. I know that I can replace the capacitor and nothing around it seems broken I am just having problems locating a replacement capacitor.

This is what the capacitor says on it

FP5K
048h
5 6 1
6.3

I figured 6.3 meant the voltage.

But if anyone could possibly help me find a replacement for this capacitor I would be extremely greatfull thanks in advance!
You'll probably have difficulties buying a single capacitor unless you can go into a computer or electronics shop local to you and they sell you one. It's usually easier to by an assortment, and the cost would probably be much the same as buying an individual component.

But what assortment to buy depends on the type capacitor. Can you post pictures? Assuming it's an aluminum electrolytic SMD, a kit something like this:
https://www.amazon.com/Electrolytic-Capacitor-Kit-Assortment-Aluminum/dp/B0793N3YJR

will give you something to sort through. You don't have to be precise with value or voltage; that's a 560mF, 6.3V cap but a 680mF 16V cap would work as well (maybe better) so long as it fits.
 
Last edited:
Jul 21, 2021
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You'll probably have difficulties buying a single capacitor unless you can go in to a computer or electronics shop local to you. It's usually easier to by an assortment, and the cost would probably be much the same as buying an individual component.

But what assortment to buy depends on the type capacitor. Can you post pictures?
Yes I can here is a photo of the capacitor https://drive.google.com/file/d/1N97bO1Mwe7m6RF0lWlyY4azoUAoCvnAD/view?usp=drivesdk would you also like a photo of the mobo?
 
Yes I can here is a photo of the capacitor https://drive.google.com/file/d/1N97bO1Mwe7m6RF0lWlyY4azoUAoCvnAD/view?usp=drivesdk would you also like a photo of the mobo?
yep...it's aluminum electrolytic. i'd go looking for an aluminum electrolytic kit on amazon or ebay or an electronics hobby website. try to buy a small kit and consider being creative with values, as I said. also remember that capacitance adds in parallel: so a 220uF and a 330uF in parallel is 550uF effectively, you can use that to your advantage. And just keep voltage rating 6.3V or higher.

oh...and remember these are polarized! so pay attention to polarity, you may have to do some sleuthing to find the positive termination on the motherboard.
 
Jul 21, 2021
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yep...it's aluminum electrolytic. i'd go looking for an aluminum electrolytic kit on amazon or ebay or an electronics hobby website. try to buy a small kit and consider being creative with values, as I said. also remember that capacitance adds in parallel: so a 220uF and a 330uF in parallel is 550uF effectively, you can use that to your advantage. And just keep voltage rating 6.3V or higher.

oh...and remember these are polarized! so pay attention to polarity, you may have to do some sleuthing to find the positive termination on the motherboard.
So thank you does it still have to be the same brand and do they have to be solid capacitors?

https://www.amazon.com/LotFancy-Electrolytic-Capacitor-Aluminum-0-1uF-1000uF/dp/B07Q3DKDQX/ref=mp_s_a_1_2_sspa?dchild=1&keywords=aluminum+electrolytic+capacitor+kit+6.3v&qid=1626918267&sr=8-2-spons&psc=1&spLa=ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUEyUkhaMkRQVTZGOTJDJmVuY3J5cHRlZElkPUEwMDUxMzM4MTFUWVhXSTc0OVZORiZlbmNyeXB0ZWRBZElkPUEwODc1NDg1T1BQVjEwQjNITjJCJndpZGdldE5hbWU9c3BfcGhvbmVfc2VhcmNoX2F0ZiZhY3Rpb249Y2xpY2tSZWRpcmVjdCZkb05vdExvZ0NsaWNrPXRydWU=

Would this work
 
One of those probably would work electrically, but they're much bigger. The area next to a CPU socket is what's called a 'keep out' zone to board designers. That means anything put in there has to fit within pretty tightly constrained envelopes so that CPU access and CPU cooler access is unrestricted. That's why they use tiny capacitors (they're not cheap!)

They might also have other characteristics that could degrade the VRM circuit operation. I'd try to stick to an aluminum electrolytic.

It does not have to be the same brand. It would be nice to make sure you get one with a 105C rating of 5K hours, as the one you're taking off does. But that's a compromise you may have to make.
 
Jul 21, 2021
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One of those probably would work electrically, but they're much bigger. The area next to a CPU socket is what's called a 'keep out' zone to board designers. That means anything put in there has to fit within pretty tightly constrained envelopes so that CPU access and CPU cooler access is unrestricted. That's why they use tiny capacitors (they're not cheap!)

They might also have other characteristics that could degrade the VRM circuit operation. I'd try to stick to an aluminum electrolytic.

It does not have to be the same brand. It would be nice to make sure you get one with a 105C rating of 5K hours, as the one you're taking off does. But that's a compromise you may have to make.
Sorry here is the correct link https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07G8XWN6R/ref=cm_sw_r_sms_apa_glt_i_SKR61XVEYYMHPVM9WFEAwould these work?
 
Do you think that this capacitor is the perfect size
....
Very likely...but hard to say without dimensions of both to compare. It meets the electrical criteria at least and appears small enough.

The envelope dimensions of the keep-out zone are established to provide maximum compatibility with most any heatsink or GPU or whatever might intrude on the market. In your case you know both so you can look at the area of your motherboard and determine how critical it is to take a chance on it. Be sure to observe polarity when installing it.

It's good you could find an open stock cap, but wow the cost! You could buy one of those kits and make a fortune selling individual parts if there was enough demand.
 

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