Question BSOD on startup 0xc0000013

Nov 19, 2020
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So since a while I have been getting a BSOD on every startup with stop code 0xc0000013.
I have found two workarounds so far. The first one is just booting via the UEFI. Just opening it on startup, and exiting it, tends to do the job.
I have also found that when I turn the PSU off and on, the first boot after that will be successful. If I restart after that, the BSOD just returns.

Once booted, the PC works as intended. For the most part that is. In the last few weeks, I noticed AVG using about 70% of my CPU, so I uninstalled it.
I wanted to try and install Panda instead, but every time I try to install it, I get a BSOD about halfway through the process. It also happened when trying to install Adobe Acrobat DC last week.
But except for that, the PC still works as intended. I can still play games on it, etc.

My setup (5 years old):
  • Intel Core i7 4790K (I have not overclocked it yet)
  • Asus Z97K Motherboard
  • Corsair Vengeance 2x8GB 1600MHz DDR3 Memory
  • Samsung SSD 850 EVO 250GB
  • MSI GTX980 4GB
  • Corsair RM650 PSU
  • Windows 10 Home
The things I tried/checked:
  • Checked if the CMOS battery might be dead -> it is not
  • Ran MemTest86 -> no errors found
  • Googled the stop code -> didn't find anything helpful
  • Updated SSD Firmware -> the problem persists
  • Ran chkdsk on the SSD (even though I doubt if it is a useful tool for SSD's, since it was designed for HDD's) -> no bad sectors found
  • Tried running diagnostic scan for SSD in Samsung Magician -> feature not supported for my SSD
  • Ran a Malwarebytes scan -> no malware was found
Since the recent crashes when installing software, I am suspecting that it might have something to do with either my SSD or my Windows installation, although I am in no way sure of this.
I am thinking about re-installing windows, but before I take such a drastic step I wanted to check here if anyone could help me finding a lead as to what is causing these BSOD's.
I don't want all my Windows settings lost if the problem is caused by the motherboard, CPU or RAM.
You can check out the dump files right here.


EDIT:

So about a day after posting this thread, I couldn't boot into Windows at all. My workarounds didn't work anymore, and instead of giving BSOD's, it just went into some kind of boot loop for a few times, followed by the troubleshoot-menu. Because I wanted to make sure my personal files were safe first, I installed Windows on an external HDD in order to boot into my system. I copied all my personal files from the SSD to another external HDD, and then wiped the SSD to be sure that if the problem was indeed Windows-related, it would be fixed (wasn't sure if a "repair Windows" option would do the job).

I installed Windows on the SSD, and I have rebooted several times for driver updates and register changes since, and I haven't encountered a single BSOD anymore. So I think that the boot files of Windows got corrupted somehow. I didn't really find the cause for that, but at least I found a solution that didn't require purchasing new hardware. Now I can only hope that the problem won't return.
 
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0xc0000013. I do not think this is a bugcheck code. I think it is a error code that indicates that a drive was disconnected. It would happen when a drive does not respond within some time out period. Normally you would update the bios and CPU chipset drivers from the motherboard vendors website as a first fix attempt.
Second you want to check for drive errors that could cause the drive to delay finding data. Google for Crystaldiskinfo.exe. it can read the drive smart error data to see if it is failing. When windows can not read data from the drive it will call for a reset of the interface and try again. Since widows will try to move data from bad spots on the drive 5 minutes after the system goes idle it could mean the drive is going bad or the drive has very little room left on it for the system to move blocks of data around. Solid state drives have firmware that kind of fight with windows. Often you can boot a system into bios and leave it powered on but not running windows so that the ssd firmware can finish its cleanup routines. Powered on in bios for a few hours.

note: dump files show a size of zero bytes this would indicate the could not be written to
you might be able to tell the system to write dump files to different drive when the system crashes. Assuming the problem is not in the driver for the drive controller.
 
Last edited:
0xc0000013. I do not think this is a bugcheck code. I think it is a error code that indicates that a drive was disconnected. It would happen when a drive does not respond within some time out period. Normally you would update the bios and CPU chipset drivers from the motherboard vendors website as a first fix attempt.
Second you want to check for drive errors that could cause the drive to delay finding data. Google for Crystaldiskinfo.exe. it can read the drive smart error data to see if it is failing. When windows can not read data from the drive it will call for a reset of the interface and try again. Since widows will try to move data from bad spots on the drive 5 minutes after the system goes idle it could mean the drive is going bad or the drive has very little room left on it for the system to move blocks of data around. Solid state drives have firmware that kind of fight with windows. Often you can boot a system into bios and leave it powered on but not running windows so that the ssd firmware can finish its cleanup routines. Powered on in bios for a few hours.

note: dump files show a size of zero bytes this would indicate the could not be written to
you might be able to tell the system to write dump files to different drive when the system crashes. Assuming the problem is not in the driver for the drive controller.
you could also get this problem with a loose connector to the drive. I have seen cases where a connector can connect and disconnect several times a second just because of thermal expansion and fan vibration. putting the drive on a different sata port with a different connector might help. I would guess a 5 year old system is more likely to be having the ssd drive shrinking in size due to bad blocks being mapped as bad by the ssd firmware. make sure you have plenty of free space on the drive , you might also want to turn off the windows paging subsystem, reboot and delete the pagefile.sys (if not already deleted) then turn the virtual memory back on and reboot again. it will create a new pagefile.sys that will not have bad blocks in it.
 
you could also get this problem with a loose connector to the drive. I have seen cases where a connector can connect and disconnect several times a second just because of thermal expansion and fan vibration. putting the drive on a different sata port with a different connector might help. I would guess a 5 year old system is more likely to be having the ssd drive shrinking in size due to bad blocks being mapped as bad by the ssd firmware. make sure you have plenty of free space on the drive , you might also want to turn off the windows paging subsystem, reboot and delete the pagefile.sys (if not already deleted) then turn the virtual memory back on and reboot again. it will create a new pagefile.sys that will not have bad blocks in it. (booting into bios to let the firmware run would also fix bad blocks in a pagefile.sys but would take longer for the system to scan and repair)
 

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