Question Bubbles in monitor - what happened?

Perene

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Oct 12, 2014
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What can account for that? These bubbles only appear when I turn the monitor ON:

https://i.postimg.cc/28PQhxRh/IMG-0381.jpg

https://i.postimg.cc/W1gMnJTK/IMG-0382.jpg

I replaced the current HDMI cable and it stayed the same. Also a microfiber cleaning cloth for electronics (dampened) didn't change anything.

The monitor is at least 10 years old: W2452V.

A few things, though, changed recently (and before these changes these bubbles NEVER appeared):

  • Motherboard replaced (old one died - was Gigabyte H97M-D3H and now it's H81T-Intel)
  • Video card (R7 265) was removed (apparently it died, too, and now I am using the onboard video from the i7 4770.
Also before I never used HDMI, only the DVI cable.

I was going to try seeing if using VGA would change anything, but before I do that I want to ask here if this is a sign this monitor will die (why?) or if there's some hardware flaw (in the MB or the CPU) that has nothing to do with the LCD.
 

Perene

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Oct 12, 2014
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For the record: changing the monitor's source from HDMI to VGA also didn't change anything. Bubbles still there. I had never used VGA before, and will never rely on it again, because it's a bizarre yellow similar to f.LUX when using a warmer color. I was wondering if I could just plug this computer into any LCD television, if this would work. If it does right when I do it then I could also check if this is hardware or software related. Please clarify if I can do this.

And if I can plug this W2452V monitor into a notebook which already is using its own video onboard. Currently I don't have another PC for testing purposes.
 

lvt

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Apr 19, 2021
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For the record: changing the monitor's source from HDMI to VGA also didn't change anything. Bubbles still there. I had never used VGA before, and will never rely on it again, because it's a bizarre yellow similar to f.LUX when using a warmer color. I was wondering if I could just plug this computer into any LCD television, if this would work. If it does right when I do it then I could also check if this is hardware or software related. Please clarify if I can do this.

And if I can plug this W2452V monitor into a notebook which already is using its own video onboard. Currently I don't have another PC for testing purposes.
It appears "physical" to me, not something you can fix by changing the cable.
 

Perene

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Oct 12, 2014
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It appears "physical" to me, not something you can fix by changing the cable.
If it is then this is the most bizarre coincidence ever, because up to a month ago these bubbles didn't appear ANYWHERE. But 1 month ago I was using another motherboard and relying on the R7 video card, not the onboard video from the i7 4770. That's why I insisted in asking if the monitor isn't perfectly OK but something else is causing this.

I know it doesn't make any sense to ask this for such an old monitor that if it were a person would have close to 100 years old, still these things don't happen without a reason and all of sudden. Could it be because I moved this LCD to plug the HDMI cable? I put the screen side down for that.

I also used a dampened cleaning cloth with water (not much, of course, slightly wet) but may have put just a bit of hand sanitizer sprayed in it.
 

Perene

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Oct 12, 2014
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The glass layers on that display panel are starting to delaminate. The only fix is to replace the panel or entire monitor. There is no fix for this.
If this is the case then why when you turn the monitor OFF you don't see any of these anomalies from the 2 pictures of my 1st post? Aren't you supposed to see them with the monitor off as well?
 

Perene

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Oct 12, 2014
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I was able to plug this old LCD into a TV, which I think it's 720p only because it worked with the 1366x768, and when changed to 1920 the image was worse. At 1366 all icons filled the screen, so a better TV would be suitable for Windows 10. The image doesn't present any sign of bubbles, so it's OK.

Is this the ultimate proof this monitor isolated from the rest has a defect? I don't understand how this happened. It could only be due to these two:

1) I also used a dampened cleaning cloth with water (not much, of course, slightly wet) but may have put just a bit of hand sanitizer sprayed in it.

2) Could it be because I moved this LCD to plug the HDMI cable? I put the screen side down for that.

I am not seeing a 3rd possibility, because it's highly unlikely the monitor would just create these cloud spots all of sudden after 2 hardware changes. If this is what happened then it's a huge coincidence.
 

lvt

Commendable
Apr 19, 2021
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1) I also used a dampened cleaning cloth with water (not much, of course, slightly wet) but may have put just a bit of hand sanitizer sprayed in it.

2) Could it be because I moved this LCD to plug the HDMI cable? I put the screen side down for that.
None sounds plausible to me.

Could be a natural deterioration that recently became worse.
 

Perene

Honorable
Oct 12, 2014
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While it was a huge coincidence this happened RIGHT BEFORE the bubbles started to appear:

The death of the old MB and GPU was just a coincidence. What damaged the old W2452V monitor for good was the use of a hand sanitizer with these ingredients:
- Ethyl alcohol 70%, denatonium benzoate and water

I always heard about any chemical product (no matter which one) having the power to damage permanently (and seriously) any screen where it was applied. In this case I didn't apply to the screen directly. What went wrong was this:

- Once a week I clean this bedroom with your usual microfiber cloth moisted with water. The top of this monitor (its bezels) is always cleaned with this cloth.

But I may have inadvertently sprayed this hand sanitizer into this cloth, so it probably once applied to the top of it just spread to the inside of this LCD. Or something worse: I may have applied to the top of the screen anyway, even if just touched slightly. A mere touch of this cloth would be enough in my view to damage it.

So, as amazing as it sounds, until yesterday this (probably) 10 year monitor was OK... until this happened. Bottom line is to never leave these chemical products in any way close to any screen you have. The damage is permanent and I think the center is now worse. It's not just a few bubbles, there's an "Oort cloud" surrounding them, exactly like the severe case an user showed to me. ***

Really unfortunate, because I was hoping this was another hardware defective. I was going to get rid of this LCD anyway, yet now I lost even more money after this incident...

*** His original message:

its the glue on the polarizing film.
It can bubble like that over time from heat / age / defect.
Mostly seen if your monitor is left in direct sunlight.

But see this is a sever case of it.


This is the result of the glue cure messing up and lifting causing a bubble between the LCD and the film.

There isn't much you can do about it outside RMA.
You could try to remove the film and then reattempt, but its too much work IMO.
 

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