"budget" editing workstation HELP!!!

G

Guest

Guest
hello, im finishing school this year and im planning on building a $1000 "budget" workstation for 3D rendering and editing (blender, octane, C4D, vegas, after effects), but only as a hobby so im not intrested in enthusiast platforms... the build i have in mind is:

r7 1700
(stock cooler)
2x8gb 3200mhz ram
msi b350 gaming plus
samsung 960 evo 250gb
seagate 1tb 7200rpm
cm masterbox lite 5
corsair cx450m

but i dont know how gpu's are used in these situations and i cant pick a proper bang for buck one... if all it does is make rendering faster should i just pick the lowest end one ?
i heard that the 1070 is the best for the money, but i dont want something so expensive since i dont game... would a 1050 or 560 do the job ? (i will be rendering 4k and downscaling it to 1080p, idk if this matters so ill just say it either way)
 

jtabb1256

Honorable
Jan 4, 2014
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For after effects and vegas / premiere pro, the GPU only helps when you use an effect that is coded to allow the GPU to render it. They're still mostly CPU dependent.

I don't know how much the GPU helps in the other ones, but there are some good benchmarks from Puget systems to see how the hardware you're looking at performs for each of the programs you mentioned.

Also, getting another SSD as a scratch and project disk may help significantly with editing smoothly.

I'm coming from editing 1440p 60fps gameplay with premiere pro and after effects. It is very demanding on my 6800k @ 4.2GHz. After effects uses all of my 16GB RAM for a fairly simple compilation. My GPU doesn't get used much with either because I don't use many effects. My 1TB HDD is slow when importing things and editing them.

The system you put there is going to be a great foundation and start, but the PSU needs to be closer to 650W or more and of higher quality because when you start overclocking, your system will consume much more. Mine uses around 350W when rendering. It's good to stay near the halfway point of the PSU if you can afford it because that's when it's the most efficient.
 

jtabb1256

Honorable
Jan 4, 2014
659
0
11,360
121
For after effects and vegas / premiere pro, the GPU only helps when you use an effect that is coded to allow the GPU to render it. They're still mostly CPU dependent.

I don't know how much the GPU helps in the other ones, but there are some good benchmarks from Puget systems to see how the hardware you're looking at performs for each of the programs you mentioned.

Also, getting another SSD as a scratch and project disk may help significantly with editing smoothly.

I'm coming from editing 1440p 60fps gameplay with premiere pro and after effects. It is very demanding on my 6800k @ 4.2GHz. After effects uses all of my 16GB RAM for a fairly simple compilation. My GPU doesn't get used much with either because I don't use many effects. My 1TB HDD is slow when importing things and editing them.

The system you put there is going to be a great foundation and start, but the PSU needs to be closer to 650W or more and of higher quality because when you start overclocking, your system will consume much more. Mine uses around 350W when rendering. It's good to stay near the halfway point of the PSU if you can afford it because that's when it's the most efficient.
 

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