Build Advice Build Advice

Mar 28, 2020
9
0
10
0
I am building a new PC build and need help from you. It is my first build and i don't know much about everything. I came up with this build from some google and youtube and before i finalize it i will welcome every suggestion from you.
Here is my Current decision on build.
Case - ANTEC DARK AVENGER E-ATX ( it comes with pre-installed 3 fans)
Monitor - LG 24 Inch FreeSync 75Hz 1920x1080p
Motherboard - Asus Prime B450M-K
CPU - AMD Ryzen 2600
Ram - Adata 16 gb kit (2x8Gb) 3200Mhz DDR4
SSD - Crucial 960GB BX500 3D NAND
HDD - I think 960 GB would be enough.
GPU - AMD ROG STRIX Radeon RX 570 4GB GDDR5 OC
SMP - CORSAIR CX450 Bronze

I have few questions too.
1> Is paying 40% extra for RAM KIT worth it? I can buy 2 8GB 3200Mhz same model i will have in kit for 6100INR while Kit will cost me 8600INR. everyone says there is rare chance that 2 sticks will not work even if they are identical. I can replace them if they will not work together.
2> Will 4GB GPU Would be enough? Will it cause any bottleneck or would be more powerful than ryzen 3500 and CPU will get bottlenecked by GPU?

My budget is 60K INR while the cost of this parts is 58K SO I have 2k left which i can use to upgrade parts.
Any suggestion which parts i can replace from this build with another powerful or suitable one?
 
Last edited:

WildCard999

Titan
Moderator
I would avoid the 3500 as it lacks the extra threads that could be utilized later on, is the 2600 or 1600 AF available where you are? Is so are they cheaper then the 3500?

1. I'd only take that chance if you can return the single sticks if they don't work at the advertised speeds together.

2. 4GB vram is enough, I used a RX 580 at 2560x1080P and with newer AAA games around High settings it was using 3.5gb vram so 4gb is fine. The Freesync would help with any minor FPS dips so it's a good choice.

Which motherboard are you getting?

It depends on the amount of games/files you have but if you think your going to exceed 1TB anytime soon then grab the 240gb SSD & 1TB HDD if that's what fits your budget. There's also the Seasonic Barracuda Compute 2TB which can usually be found for pretty cheap ($55 in the US)
 
Mar 28, 2020
9
0
10
0
I would avoid the 3500 as it lacks the extra threads that could be utilized later on, is the 2600 or 1600 AF available where you are? Is so are they cheaper then the 3500?

1. I'd only take that chance if you can return the single sticks if they don't work at the advertised speeds together.

2. 4GB vram is enough, I used a RX 580 at 2560x1080P and with newer AAA games around High settings it was using 3.5gb vram so 4gb is fine. The Freesync would help with any minor FPS dips so it's a good choice.

Which motherboard are you getting?

It depends on the amount of games/files you have but if you think your going to exceed 1TB anytime soon then grab the 240gb SSD & 1TB HDD if that's what fits your budget. There's also the Seasonic Barracuda Compute 2TB which can usually be found for pretty cheap ($55 in the US)
Yes, i can replace the sticks if they don't work ( for it i have to change my purchase site to amazon.in)
And i don't think i will run out of space even my current build has 500gb hdd and i don't have issues of storage (maybe because i don't play big games on it as they are unsupported).
Also i am planning to go with Asus prime b450m k. I forgot to mention it in thread, now it is there.
 
Mar 28, 2020
9
0
10
0
I would avoid the 3500 as it lacks the extra threads that could be utilized later on, is the 2600 or 1600 AF available where you are? Is so are they cheaper then the 3500?

1. I'd only take that chance if you can return the single sticks if they don't work at the advertised speeds together.

2. 4GB vram is enough, I used a RX 580 at 2560x1080P and with newer AAA games around High settings it was using 3.5gb vram so 4gb is fine. The Freesync would help with any minor FPS dips so it's a good choice.

Which motherboard are you getting?

It depends on the amount of games/files you have but if you think your going to exceed 1TB anytime soon then grab the 240gb SSD & 1TB HDD if that's what fits your budget. There's also the Seasonic Barracuda Compute 2TB which can usually be found for pretty cheap ($55 in the US)
Yes, i have AMD 2600 available and it is slight more costly ( around 15$ or 1100INR)but in my budget.
 
Mar 28, 2020
9
0
10
0
Yeah, you're already at 60K INR without a motherboard...perhaps the MSI B450M Pro-VDH MAX = ₹11,000
*Edit the Asus B450m K isn't guaranteed to ship with a BIOS version installed that supports Ryzen 3000 and may need to a BIOS update using a 1st or 2nd Gen CPU first. Is that possible for you to source that?

Not sure you need an E-ATX case. That's going to be pretty large.

Other than that, not a bad build so far.
The product page only says it support 1st/2nd gen processors while official asus site has listed ryzen 2600 under supported list
 
Last edited:
1. buy ram only in a single matched kit.

Ram is sold in kits for a reason.
A motherboard must manage all the ram using the same specs of voltage, cas and speed.
The internal workings are designed for the capacity of the kit.
Ram from the same vendor and part number can be made up of differing manufacturing components over time.
Some motherboards, can be very sensitive to this.
This is more difficult when more sticks are involved.

You want documented ram compatibility. If you should ever have a problem, you want supported ram.
Otherwise, you risk a finger pointing battle between the ram and motherboard support sites, claiming "not my problem".
One place to check is your motherboards web site.
Look for the ram QVL list. It lists all of the ram kits that have been tested with that particular motherboard.
Sometimes the QVL list is not updated after the motherboard is released.
For more current info, go to a ram vendor's web site and access their ram selection configurator.
Enter your motherboard, and you will get a list of compatible ram kits.
While today's motherboards are more tolerant of different ram, it makes sense to buy ram that is known to work and is supported.

2. Do not buy a gpu based on vram specs. AMD and Nvidia use vram differently.
The amount of Vram you get with a card will be appropriate to the performance of the card.

As a general rule of thumb, budget 2x the cost of your processor for the graphics card.

450w is inadequate for a RX570.
Here is a handy chart to size the psu:
http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page362.htm
Buy only a quality power supply.
Here is one list of psu quality tiers; buy no less than tier 3.

Today, ssd prices are down. I would plan on a single sufficiently large ssd for everything.
1tb will go quite far. It is easy to add storage later if you need to.
On a budget, a 1tb intel 660P is a good pick.
But, do not be impressed by fast sequential benchmarks for devices. Most activity is small random I/O.
On a budget, you might find a conventional sata ssd to be quite good.

As to Intel vs ryzen, take your pick.
Once you are in the $200 price class you are going to get a good gaming processor.
Today, ryzen offers more threads which are very useful if you primarily play multiplayer games with many perticipants.
OTPH, if you play sims, strategy or MMO types, intel may offer better single thread speeds.
If you favor fast action games, spend a bit more on the graphics card.
On the Intel side, you may want to see what the upcoming April announcements bring.
No way is intel going to let ryzen eat their lunch.
 
Mar 28, 2020
9
0
10
0
1. buy ram only in a single matched kit.

Ram is sold in kits for a reason.
A motherboard must manage all the ram using the same specs of voltage, cas and speed.
The internal workings are designed for the capacity of the kit.
Ram from the same vendor and part number can be made up of differing manufacturing components over time.
Some motherboards, can be very sensitive to this.
This is more difficult when more sticks are involved.

You want documented ram compatibility. If you should ever have a problem, you want supported ram.
Otherwise, you risk a finger pointing battle between the ram and motherboard support sites, claiming "not my problem".
One place to check is your motherboards web site.
Look for the ram QVL list. It lists all of the ram kits that have been tested with that particular motherboard.
Sometimes the QVL list is not updated after the motherboard is released.
For more current info, go to a ram vendor's web site and access their ram selection configurator.
Enter your motherboard, and you will get a list of compatible ram kits.
While today's motherboards are more tolerant of different ram, it makes sense to buy ram that is known to work and is supported.

2. Do not buy a gpu based on vram specs. AMD and Nvidia use vram differently.
The amount of Vram you get with a card will be appropriate to the performance of the card.

As a general rule of thumb, budget 2x the cost of your processor for the graphics card.

450w is inadequate for a RX570.
Here is a handy chart to size the psu:
http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page362.htm
Buy only a quality power supply.
Here is one list of psu quality tiers; buy no less than tier 3.

Today, ssd prices are down. I would plan on a single sufficiently large ssd for everything.
1tb will go quite far. It is easy to add storage later if you need to.
On a budget, a 1tb intel 660P is a good pick.
But, do not be impressed by fast sequential benchmarks for devices. Most activity is small random I/O.
On a budget, you might find a conventional sata ssd to be quite good.

As to Intel vs ryzen, take your pick.
Once you are in the $200 price class you are going to get a good gaming processor.
Today, ryzen offers more threads which are very useful if you primarily play multiplayer games with many perticipants.
OTPH, if you play sims, strategy or MMO types, intel may offer better single thread speeds.
If you favor fast action games, spend a bit more on the graphics card.
On the Intel side, you may want to see what the upcoming April announcements bring.
No way is intel going to let ryzen eat their lunch.
So i should buy a ram kit so they work perfectly at their rated speed.
I tried to find qvl list for msi b450m mortar max but could not find it, so adata gammix d10 will work with motherboard..
Also rx570 is a good gpu for ryzen 2600 or should i buy a better one or cheaper one to perfectly match the cpu.
 
Here is the QVL list for a 2x00 processor.
Note that it will differ if you plan on using a 3x00 processor.
https://www.msi.com/Motherboard/support/B450M-MORTAR-MAX#support-mem-14

There are some adata ram kits on the list, but you need to be more specific as to the part number you are considering.

On graphics, I am not so hot on the RX graphics cards. They are an older gen and power hungry.
Usually needing some 75w more than an equivalent performing nvidia card.
Any way you look at it, you are going to want more than the 450w unit you listed.
And... do not go cheap on the psu.
A cheap PSU will be made of substandard components. It will not have safety and overload protections.
If it fails under load, it can destroy anything it is connected to.
It will deliver advertised power only at room temperatures, not at higher temperatures found when installed in a case.
The wattage will be delivered on the 3 and 5v rails, not on the 12v rails where modern parts
like the CPU and Graphics cards need it. What power is delivered may fluctuate and cause instability
issues that are hard to diagnose.
The fan will need to spin up higher to cool it, making it noisy.
A cheap PSU can become very expensive. DO NOT buy one.

My general advice is to buy the strongest graphics card you conscience and wallet will allow.
If you do not, you will forever question your decision.
Here is a nice chart which ranks cards as to performance:
https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gpu-hierarchy,4388.html
 
Last edited:

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS