[SOLVED] Building an Gaming PC for sale. How to sell??

macdiva

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Feb 21, 2018
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I have the itch to build another pc, and this will be the first one I'd put up for sale. It's going to be an entry-level gaming/ Ryzen APU build and would like to market it as a Ryzen upgrade path for entry-level gaming. So no GPU. I'd like to go local and deal in cash. But how do I warranty or do I even warranty MY work on it other than the manufacturer's warranties, and for how long?? What's the best way for me to do this type of deal?? And what is a fair amount to mark up from parts pricing??
 
Don't bother. I think you'll be lucky to even break even on the hardware costs, especially after you get raked on commissions from the seller (Ebay/etc). And that's assuming you can snag someone looking for those specific specs from a private builder instead of an actual company with legit warranty/tech support services.

Your best bet is to find someone looking for a PC. And build a PC for THAT person.
 

clutchc

Titan
Ambassador
Everybody that resells new builds has a different way of selling. In your case, I'd offer somewhere between a 14 day to 30-day full refund return policy and leave it at that. Your handy work problems (if any) would show up well before that. And there's no sense warrantying the manufacturer's parts. You have no control over those.

If you're intending to make a profit on the sale... good luck. Build for fun, sell for cost. Build another.
 

Gam3r01

Titan
Moderator
Just to add to that, this would certainly be a "for fun" venture.
Nobody is really going to be willing to buy a system for a premium (*read: Profit in your pocket) price when they could either do it themselves or buy from a big box company.
 

clutchc

Titan
Ambassador
...also it depends on how long you're willing to wait for a customer. Selling locally doesn't give you access to a very large group of perspective buyers unless your local area is extremely huge. That's why someplace like ebay is popular. you can sell to the whole country or to the whole world if you want. And the seller and buyer have Paypal protection guarantees. But you pay for those benefits with ~9-11% cut to them right off the top.
 
Don't bother. I think you'll be lucky to even break even on the hardware costs, especially after you get raked on commissions from the seller (Ebay/etc). And that's assuming you can snag someone looking for those specific specs from a private builder instead of an actual company with legit warranty/tech support services.

Your best bet is to find someone looking for a PC. And build a PC for THAT person.
 

WildCard999

Titan
Ambassador
Your best bet is to find someone looking for a PC. And build a PC for THAT person.
^^^This! Almost all of my builds I do are for friends, family & coworkers. A few months ago I did a build for a coworker for his photography business and he likes the system, no issues. He approached me today to do a gaming build for his son and gave me a budget. What I'll end up doing is getting him a part list, letting him buy the parts then he'll give me the parts to build the system, get Windows installed as well as drivers and make sure everything runs smooth. I don't charge anything to do it but he usually tips me $40-$60.

Getting to do a build every few months allows me to quench my thirst for building without spending a lot of money. Even if there's no new builds to work on I'll then resort to older used systems.
 

Gam3r01

Titan
Moderator
Don't bother. I think you'll be lucky to even break even on the hardware costs, especially after you get raked on commissions from the seller (Ebay/etc). And that's assuming you can snag someone looking for those specific specs from a private builder instead of an actual company with legit warranty/tech support services.

Your best bet is to find someone looking for a PC. And build a PC for THAT person.
Commission builds are a great way to go about it.
 

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