Build Advice Building my first comp: MOBO, CPU, & GPU Advice

May 22, 2019
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Hello! I am looking to build my first PC sometime this summer (the sooner the better, but willing to wait until the end of Q3 for price drops/new gen components). It will be more of a budget build with the priority being upgrade-ability. I do not do much gaming (currently only League of Legends and tend to only dabble in MMORPGs, no FPS). I do some photo editing as a hobby and small-scale coding for my graduate studies (essentially just data analysis for social science research data sets). Basically, I do not do anything that requires high-level performance, but it has been a lifelong goal to build my own PC, so I am ready to take the plunge and construct something that makes me say "wow!" when performing the tasks I do. Ideally, I'd like to buy a foundation that allows me to upgrade it on an as-needed basis to service me for the next decade, assuming my needs don't spontaneously increase.

All that said, I'm currently at a bit of an impasse. The current Ryzen prices have dropped, and I'm not sure how much more (if any) I should expect them to dip once the 3000 is revealed + released. I am more comfortable buying a proven Ryzen 7 2700X at a discount than investing in the new gen, but it seems the general consensus it to just wait. My (noob) thought is I'd rather wait so that I can purchase an x570 motherboard and still stick a 2700x on it. This at least will allow me to update the CPU down the road if I really see the need. Investing in an unproven 3000 on top of that seems like a needless investment. Even the 2700x is overkill (?), but there is probably value in splurging on the front-end for the motherboard?

Similarly, when looking at GPUs, I was simply looking at going for an RX 580/590 since their prices have dropped. This is something that I certainly don't need to splurge on until my needs change, I would think.

Overall, does this thought process make sense?

For my needs, is prioritizing a new gen MOBO best?

Noob Question Is it feasible for me to fit this all in to a smaller case and still maintain upgrade-ability down the road, or is a mid-tower unequivocally the way to go when trying to prioritize "futureproof-ness"? I am likely going to just stick with a single SSD (250 GB Samsung EVO Plus) as most of my photo/data workflow is with externals, but it would be nice to have room for a second SSD or HDD.

Here is what I'm twerking with so far.

[Edit] https://pcpartpicker.com/list/QtMDP3

Much thanks from this rookie!!

Edit: Here is the updated build I am now considering thus far


PCPartPicker Part List: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/2PMdyX

CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 1600 3.2 GHz 6-Core Processor ($118.50 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: MSI - B450I GAMING PLUS AC Mini ITX AM4 Motherboard ($126.00 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($89.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Samsung - 970 Evo Plus 250 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($67.99 @ B&H)
Video Card: Sapphire - Radeon RX 580 8 GB PULSE Video Card ($179.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design - Node 304 Mini ITX Tower Case ($97.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Power Supply: EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($79.99 @ B&H)
Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit ($99.39 @ OutletPC)
Total: $859.83
 
Last edited:

JJoner

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You can put Ryzen 3000 chips in some B450 motherboards with a BIOS update, however only a few motherboards support some of the new features such as PCIE 4. If you need this PC in the next 2 1/2 months then I'd go for the used 2700x and a B450 that is compatible with Ryzen 3000. If you can wait then I would get a x570 and just buy a Ryzen 3000. I'm not sure that the 2700x is compatible with x570, I'd imagine not since the x570 doesnt support features the 2700x relies on (Pcie 3.0).

Also the 2700x doesn't have an integrated graphics card. So you will need a dedicated GPU to get display.
 
May 22, 2019
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You can put Ryzen 3000 chips in some B450 motherboards with a BIOS update, however only a few motherboards support some of the new features such as PCIE 4. If you need this PC in the next 2 1/2 months then I'd go for the used 2700x and a B450 that is compatible with Ryzen 3000. If you can wait then I would get a x570 and just buy a Ryzen 3000. I'm not sure that the 2700x is compatible with x570, I'd imagine not since the x570 doesnt support features the 2700x relies on (Pcie 3.0).

Also the 2700x doesn't have an integrated graphics card. So you will need a dedicated GPU to get display.
Ah, thank you! Well, I was looking at a Sapphire Radeon RX 590 8 GB NITRO + SE Video Card. Would I need anything in addition? Sorry for my ignorance hah.

Also, I don't need it imminently, but my thought was that the Ryzen 3000 + an x570 would be excessive. I was under the impression the new PCIe 4.0 ports would be backwards compatible, so I could at least save on CPU costs now while keeping the ability to upgrade down the road where if I buy a B450 I will be limited.
 
May 22, 2019
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What do you believe the benefit of an "X" over a plain 2700 is?
In terms of what I would actually see in terms of performance with the tasks I currently do, probably nothing. But perhaps it would tide me over an extra 1-2 years down the road. Is there a benefit to the lower TDP of the non-X 2700?
 

JJoner

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Ah, thank you! Well, I was looking at a Sapphire Radeon RX 590 8 GB NITRO + SE Video Card. Would I need anything in addition? Sorry for my ignorance hah.

Also, I don't need it imminently, but my thought was that the Ryzen 3000 + an x570 would be excessive. I was under the impression the new PCIe 4.0 ports would be backwards compatible, so I could at least save on CPU costs now while keeping the ability to upgrade down the road where if I buy a B450 I will be limited.
You shouldnt need anything else besides a GPU.

I'm not exactly sure if a 2700x will work in an x570 motherboard, you will have to check with someone more knowledgeable than me, I just have a suspicion it won't.

As for future upgrades, if you wait until ryzen 3000 you can get a CPU that matches or even surpasses the 2700x for relatively cheap. If the leaks are true then I could see a $180 3600 out performing a 2700x. However they are only leaks and aren't necessarily true.
 
Reactions: hapa.boi32
The 2700x's base/turbo clock is a guaranteed 3.7/4.1 GHz over the 2700's 3.2 GHz/3.9 GHz...; the lower TDP is from the lower clock speeds/core voltage needed for the lower clock speeds.

If just gaming, I'd opt for either the 2600X or the 2700X, unless you are comfortable with overclocking...

If willing to wait a couple months, I'd just wait and see what the new CPUs are bringing to the table first...; you might be able to find substantially better than 2600X/2700X performance for less money.
 
What is your budget?
It seems to me that your needs are modest.
Here is a post for a budget build that I did some time ago.
See if some of it makes sense to you:

------------------------------ budget build ---------------------------
For a budget gaming build, I like to recommend that one builds for future expandability.
That means paying a bit more up front for some parts that allow for an easier future upgrade.
A good rule of thumb is to budget twice as much for the graphics card than for the cpu.

Let me start where you might not expect:

1. Buy a good 450-550w psu or better. A quality 450w will run a card as good as a GTX1060 or possibly a GTX1070
Future graphics cards will be built on smaller 14nm so they should not need more power than today.
Look for a tier 1 or 2 quality unit on a list such as this:

Seasonic is always good I particularly like the seasonic focus line:
This 550w unit is often on sale.
https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?item=N82E16817151203


2. Buy a lga1151 Z370/Z390 based motherboard. About $100.
Do not begrudge paying a bit more now forZ390 which enables the upgrade to much stronger K suffix processors.

3. I suggest a G5600 4 threads, passmark 5707/2266 About $135.
In time, you can upgrade to any 9th gen I3/I5/I7 cpu that you want and market the original processor.
If you want to go stronger up front, the i5-9600K and a decent cooler will cost you about $300

4. The intel stock cooler will do the job if you are not overclocking; the K suffix processors do not come with a cooler.

5. For ram, speed is not important. Buy a 16gb kit of 2 x 8gb DDR4
About $75.
Heat spreaders are marketing and generally useless.


6. Cases are a personal thing. Buy one you love. Most will do the job for <$50.
Here is a Silverstone PS07 for $95; It fits a smaller M-ATX motherboard.
https://www.newegg.com/p/N82E16811163186
I like the case for expansion.
It has two front 120mm intakes with easily removable filters.
That keeps your parts clean.
The case will support a later high end air cooler if you upgrade your processor.


7. The graphics card is the most important component for gaming.
I think a GTX1660 class card would be appropriate, plan on $220.
Tom's rates the card at 63.6
I like the nvidia cards better because they use less power compared to the popular RX570 which is rated at 48.3
You could go stronger in the video card if your budget permits and your games need it.
I like EVGA as a brand. They have a 90 day trade up program if you find you need something stronger. Read the fine print on the program.

On the other hand, you could build using the integrated 630 graphics which is quite good and see how you do.
By deferring on the graphics card, you will get a better idea of what you really need.
Integrated is fine for sims, but not fast action games.

8. Lastly, I will never build again without a SSD for the "C" drive. It makes everything you do so much quicker.
Buy a samsung evo of 240gb or better; a 500gb evo in either 2.5" or m.2 format is in the $80 range.



I built such a system for my grandkids.
They were pleased with how quick it seemed.
-------------good luck------------

As to your question about size:
M-ATX has 4 expansion slots, ATX will have 7.
Just how many will you ever use?
For most of us, including me, that is exactly one for a discrete graphics card.
Not a problem at all.

On m.2 devices, they come in sata or pcie with pcie being the better sequential performer.
That is not such a big thing as you might expect.
90% of what goes on in windows is small random I/o and not sequential.
Modern motherboards will usually have 2/3 m.2 slots on the motherboard.
 
May 22, 2019
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Thank you so much for all of your guys' feedback!

@geofelt I appreciate you sharing the build with me! It certainly gives me pause. Since it is my first build, I suppose I could just enjoy the process and not focus too much on preparing for upgrades down the road. Realistically, it wouldn't save me much money, if any.

My budget is technically up to $1,000, not including a monitor and peripherals. For my current needs, I'm pretty sure I could make a decent build for $700 that lasts me ~4-5 years. What is the reason you recommend Intel over Ryzen?
 
May 22, 2019
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rigg42

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Doesn't surprise me. I spent a bit of time writing that up because I got tired of typing the same thoughts repeatedly on 70 different threads. Nobody even replied to it. That either means it's crap, nobody disagreed with my thoughts, or nobody cared enough to challenge any of my assertions. It's just my thoughts and certainly not gospel. Hope it helps and you are welcome.
 
Hello! I am looking to build my first PC sometime this summer (the sooner the better, but willing to wait until the end of Q3 for price drops/new gen components). It will be more of a budget build with the priority being upgrade-ability. I do not do much gaming (currently only League of Legends and tend to only dabble in MMORPGs, no FPS). I do some photo editing as a hobby and small-scale coding for my graduate studies (essentially just data analysis for social science research data sets). Basically, I do not do anything that requires high-level performance, but it has been a lifelong goal to build my own PC, so I am ready to take the plunge and construct something that makes me say "wow!" when performing the tasks I do. Ideally, I'd like to buy a foundation that allows me to upgrade it on an as-needed basis to service me for the next decade, assuming my needs don't spontaneously increase.

All that said, I'm currently at a bit of an impasse. The current Ryzen prices have dropped, and I'm not sure how much more (if any) I should expect them to dip once the 3000 is revealed + released. I am more comfortable buying a proven Ryzen 7 2700X at a discount than investing in the new gen, but it seems the general consensus it to just wait. My (noob) thought is I'd rather wait so that I can purchase an x570 motherboard and still stick a 2700x on it. This at least will allow me to update the CPU down the road if I really see the need. Investing in an unproven 3000 on top of that seems like a needless investment. Even the 2700x is overkill (?), but there is probably value in splurging on the front-end for the motherboard?

Similarly, when looking at GPUs, I was simply looking at going for an RX 580/590 since their prices have dropped. This is something that I certainly don't need to splurge on until my needs change, I would think.

Overall, does this thought process make sense?

For my needs, is prioritizing a new gen MOBO best?

Noob Question Is it feasible for me to fit this all in to a smaller case and still maintain upgrade-ability down the road, or is a mid-tower unequivocally the way to go when trying to prioritize "futureproof-ness"? I am likely going to just stick with a single SSD (250 GB Samsung EVO Plus) as most of my photo/data workflow is with externals, but it would be nice to have room for a second SSD or HDD.

Here is what I'm twerking with so far.

[Edit] https://pcpartpicker.com/list/QtMDP3

Much thanks from this rookie!!
You r list looks good. This would be a good Motherboard for that build: https://www.newegg.com/asus-rog-strix-b450-f-gaming/p/N82E16813119140
 
Reactions: hapa.boi32
Thank you so much for all of your guys' feedback!

@geofelt I appreciate you sharing the build with me! It certainly gives me pause. Since it is my first build, I suppose I could just enjoy the process and not focus too much on preparing for upgrades down the road. Realistically, it wouldn't save me much money, if any.

My budget is technically up to $1,000, not including a monitor and peripherals. For my current needs, I'm pretty sure I could make a decent build for $700 that lasts me ~4-5 years. What is the reason you recommend Intel over Ryzen?
A very good question.
The primary reason for me is probably bias from working with intel over time.

But, really it is the same reason why some like ford over chevy or...
From a technical point of view, there are two things I like about intel.
1. They usually come with integrated graphics. It is sufficient for HD movie playback and some games.
Having integrated graphics available lets you get started without needing a more expensive graphics card.
Integrated graphics gives you an alternative when diagnosing graphics problems.
2. Intel today is a bit more efficient per clock than ryzen. Ryzen 3000 series is supposed to catch up.
The single thread performance of intel is better. That makes the ordinary things we do a bit snappier and many games are still largely single threaded. With a 9th gen K suffix processor most are getting around 5.0 when overclocking.
With ryzen,, the upper limit is around 43.
Does this matter?? probably not since most games are graphics limited.

For an app or game to take effective advantage of many threads, it needs to be programmed well.
Some types of games simply can't be split up into many tasks.
Multiplayer games are the best example of where many threads which you do get with ryzen works well.
OTOH, sims, mmo and strategy games are still largely cpu limited and single threaded.
For a mixed environment where gaming and batch apps share the workload, I think it is easier to tolerate longer batch run times due to a shortage of threads than to have stutters while gaming due to insufficient single thread performance.

Two tips:
  1. while waiting for parts to be delivered, download and read both the motherboard and case manuals.
  2. Buy yourself a longish #2 magnetic head Philips head screwdriver for assembly.
 
I would disagree about the suggestion for a Pentium G5600. A 2-core, 4-thread processor for a desktop system 2019? And for over $100? Around that price range it's close to what a Ryzen 1600 costs. Due to the Pentium's limited clocks and core count, a Ryzen 1600 should outperform it in most modern games, while having 6-cores with 12-threads should keep it performing well further into the future. Dual-core processors are kind of on their last legs at this point, and that Pentium should be priced half as much as what it is selling for.

Or even if one wants to go Intel, they could get a 6-core i5-9400F for around $150. Like the Ryzen 1600, it lacks integrated graphics, but that shouldn't be much of a concern for anyone getting a dedicated card anyway.
 
Where you start is up to you.
For a initial build experience, any modern processor will do.
For most games, favor fast single thread clock rates.
Yes, the G5600 has only 4 threads. It has a total passmark rating of 5667 compared to a 12 thread ryzen 1600 with an impressive rating of 12278. But, that 12278 applies only when all 12 threads are 100% utilized. That is not something you will see in most games.
For most games, the single thread rating of the G5600 of 2267 will be better than the comparable 1822 of the ryzen 1600.
My point is that a G5600 is a reasonable starting point.

For a step up, the i5-9400F is a good deal at $150 with 6 threads and a rating of 12192, equivalent to the ryzen 1600.
Where the 9400F wins is in a higher clock rate score of 2389.
If the initial build will include a discrete graphics card, the 9400F is a great processor.
FWIW, there is a i5-9400 that included HD630 graphics, but the price is considerably higher.

One can go higher and higher, but that is not a starter budget build, more like an ending build.
 
Reactions: hapa.boi32
May 22, 2019
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Where you start is up to you.
For a initial build experience, any modern processor will do.
For most games, favor fast single thread clock rates.
Yes, the G5600 has only 4 threads. It has a total passmark rating of 5667 compared to a 12 thread ryzen 1600 with an impressive rating of 12278. But, that 12278 applies only when all 12 threads are 100% utilized. That is not something you will see in most games.
For most games, the single thread rating of the G5600 of 2267 will be better than the comparable 1822 of the ryzen 1600.
My point is that a G5600 is a reasonable starting point.

For a step up, the i5-9400F is a good deal at $150 with 6 threads and a rating of 12192, equivalent to the ryzen 1600.
Where the 9400F wins is in a higher clock rate score of 2389.
If the initial build will include a discrete graphics card, the 9400F is a great processor.
FWIW, there is a i5-9400 that included HD630 graphics, but the price is considerably higher.

One can go higher and higher, but that is not a starter budget build, more like an ending build.
I really appreciate the benchmarks. I think perhaps a 1600 would be the direction I am now headed, while trying to fit everything in an mITX case. To your knowledge, would a 1600 likely be compatible with an x570 mobo? If not, then I'm just looking at an MSi B450
 
Apr 14, 2019
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Hello a shortcut amazon has a car aspire tower wit 2 t.v. he'd 12 GB ram monitor etc at 375is separate but most likely has pci slot you can upgrade the gpu to nvidea 1060 or such acerr 1920p monitor separate is 89 dollars and 8 to 150 for a game controller and mouse upgrade
 
Apr 14, 2019
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Hello a shortcut amazon has a car aspire tower wit 2 t.v. he'd 12 GB ram monitor etc at 375is separate but most likely has pci slot you can upgrade the gpu to nvidea 1060 or such acerr 1920p monitor separate is 89 dollars and 8 to 150 for a game controller and mouse upgrade
2 TB hdd 375 dollars for tower and accessories without monitor sorry onscreen keyboard auto fill ...errors
 
Reactions: hapa.boi32
Apr 14, 2019
11
3
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Hello a shortcut amazon has a car aspire tower wit 2 t.v. he'd 12 GB ram monitor etc at 375is separate but most likely has pci slot you can upgrade the gpu to nvidea 1060 or such acerr 1920p monitor separate is 89 dollars and 8 to 150 for a game controller and mouse upgrade
for 1st build maybe to aim at ddr4 12 16 32 GB to move things along and help you performance
 
Reactions: hapa.boi32
I really appreciate the benchmarks. I think perhaps a 1600 would be the direction I am now headed, while trying to fit everything in an mITX case. To your knowledge, would a 1600 likely be compatible with an x570 mobo? If not, then I'm just looking at an MSi B450
X570 is not yet readily available, certainly not in ITX format.
Love those ITX builds; I have done a few.
What case do you have in mind and why are you looking at ITX?
 
Reactions: hapa.boi32
May 22, 2019
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X570 is not yet readily available, certainly not in ITX format.
Love those ITX builds; I have done a few.
What case do you have in mind and why are you looking at ITX?
Gotchya. Well waiting for an x570 ITX would really be the only next-gen component I'd be waiting on at this point. I'll see what the effect on prices are on the other components after Computex next week and then go from there. I'm doing this more of the experience as opposed to maximizing component performance per dollar. The parts I am eyeing now (see below) seem to have all already jobbed a decent amount in the past 6-12 months, so I'm not sure how much merit there would be in waiting until E3. It's the perpetual cycle of technology, albeit a supposedly significant next-gen.

Regarding the ITX I'm looking to minimize on space and construct something my partner won't complain about seeing haha. I saw a few LZ7 mini ITX case builds with the walnut panel and was enamored. At that price point perhaps just a DAN case, but that's something I need to research more.The small form factor in general is most appealing to me.

PCPartPicker Part List: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/2PMdyX

CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 1600 3.2 GHz 6-Core Processor ($118.50 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: MSI - B450I GAMING PLUS AC Mini ITX AM4 Motherboard ($126.00 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($89.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Samsung - 970 Evo Plus 250 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($67.99 @ B&H)
Video Card: Sapphire - Radeon RX 580 8 GB PULSE Video Card ($179.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design - Node 304 Mini ITX Tower Case ($97.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Power Supply: EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($79.99 @ B&H)
Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit ($99.39 @ OutletPC)
Total: $859.83


This comes out to $900-$1,000 depending on the case. It's tough for me to envision the 1600 going down anything significant in price (waiting into July or August for it to drop below $100 doesn't seem worth it to me). And while the next-gen entry level CPU may be bounds ahead in performance at a similar price point, I would expect needing to pay more upfront for the x570 to go with it. Again, I will just wait and see how the market reacts after Computex before pulling any triggers. For me, I'm content with this as a first build because it should meet my needs at least for the next 3 years, at which point I can either scrap most of it and re-use the case for a more premium build (I think the power supply will probably be enough as well given the direction of the industry regarding power efficiency?) or if I'm cash strapped this build still has some room for upgrade.
 

rigg42

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Gotchya. Well waiting for an x570 ITX would really be the only next-gen component I'd be waiting on at this point. I'll see what the effect on prices are on the other components after Computex next week and then go from there. I'm doing this more of the experience as opposed to maximizing component performance per dollar. The parts I am eyeing now (see below) seem to have all already jobbed a decent amount in the past 6-12 months, so I'm not sure how much merit there would be in waiting until E3. It's the perpetual cycle of technology, albeit a supposedly significant next-gen.

Regarding the ITX I'm looking to minimize on space and construct something my partner won't complain about seeing haha. I saw a few LZ7 mini ITX case builds with the walnut panel and was enamored. At that price point perhaps just a DAN case, but that's something I need to research more.The small form factor in general is most appealing to me.

PCPartPicker Part List: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/2PMdyX

CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 1600 3.2 GHz 6-Core Processor ($118.50 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: MSI - B450I GAMING PLUS AC Mini ITX AM4 Motherboard ($126.00 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($89.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Samsung - 970 Evo Plus 250 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($67.99 @ B&H)
Video Card: Sapphire - Radeon RX 580 8 GB PULSE Video Card ($179.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design - Node 304 Mini ITX Tower Case ($97.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Power Supply: EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($79.99 @ B&H)
Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit ($99.39 @ OutletPC)
Total: $859.83


This comes out to $900-$1,000 depending on the case. It's tough for me to envision the 1600 going down anything significant in price (waiting into July or August for it to drop below $100 doesn't seem worth it to me). And while the next-gen entry level CPU may be bounds ahead in performance at a similar price point, I would expect needing to pay more upfront for the x570 to go with it. Again, I will just wait and see how the market reacts after Computex before pulling any triggers. For me, I'm content with this as a first build because it should meet my needs at least for the next 3 years, at which point I can either scrap most of it and re-use the case for a more premium build (I think the power supply will probably be enough as well given the direction of the industry regarding power efficiency?) or if I'm cash strapped this build still has some room for upgrade.
I like it. One thing I'd address is the lack of storage. That drive is too small and kind of a price bracket mismatch for the caliber of components you're using IMO. A larger capacity SATA drive would be better.

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/4Qw7YJ/crucial-mx500-1tb-m2-2280-solid-state-drive-ct1000mx500ssd4

I like the MSI's power delivery but think the Rog Strix b450i is a better board in every other way. It's VRM is still pretty darn good. Just not as good as the MSI which has the best b450 VRM you can buy. I got lucky and manged to snag the Asus and a 1600 for $165 from Micro Center for my living room PC. The MSI is still a good board though.
 
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May 22, 2019
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Thanks! I was giving the ASUS a hard look. Maybe it will just come down to what I can get the better deal on when the time actually comes.

Regarding storage, I'm really torn. On one hand bigger is always better, but on my current setup, I really only have ~180 GB of data, and that's without any cleansing. I figured storage was one of the things I could always upgrade as-needed? For me with my photography, I find my workflow is better when I have limited internal storage, which forces me to be more diligent with my externals and backups. At most, I'd probably go up to a 500 GB, but I'm uncertain of its worth to me at this point. Thoughts?
 

rigg42

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I'd go 500 gb at least. I forgot that you weren't running any huge modern games. As a rule of thumb you don't want to run SSDs more than 70% full or you'll lose performance. 500 gb - 1tb tend to be better cost per GB. NVME is nice but probably not that big of a deal for you. There are plenty of reasonably priced quality m.2 sata drives.
 
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xravenxdota

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Gotchya. Well waiting for an x570 ITX would really be the only next-gen component I'd be waiting on at this point. I'll see what the effect on prices are on the other components after Computex next week and then go from there. I'm doing this more of the experience as opposed to maximizing component performance per dollar. The parts I am eyeing now (see below) seem to have all already jobbed a decent amount in the past 6-12 months, so I'm not sure how much merit there would be in waiting until E3. It's the perpetual cycle of technology, albeit a supposedly significant next-gen.

Regarding the ITX I'm looking to minimize on space and construct something my partner won't complain about seeing haha. I saw a few LZ7 mini ITX case builds with the walnut panel and was enamored. At that price point perhaps just a DAN case, but that's something I need to research more.The small form factor in general is most appealing to me.

PCPartPicker Part List: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/2PMdyX

CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 1600 3.2 GHz 6-Core Processor ($118.50 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: MSI - B450I GAMING PLUS AC Mini ITX AM4 Motherboard ($126.00 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($89.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Samsung - 970 Evo Plus 250 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($67.99 @ B&H)
Video Card: Sapphire - Radeon RX 580 8 GB PULSE Video Card ($179.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design - Node 304 Mini ITX Tower Case ($97.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Power Supply: EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($79.99 @ B&H)
Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit ($99.39 @ OutletPC)
Total: $859.83


This comes out to $900-$1,000 depending on the case. It's tough for me to envision the 1600 going down anything significant in price (waiting into July or August for it to drop below $100 doesn't seem worth it to me). And while the next-gen entry level CPU may be bounds ahead in performance at a similar price point, I would expect needing to pay more upfront for the x570 to go with it. Again, I will just wait and see how the market reacts after Computex before pulling any triggers. For me, I'm content with this as a first build because it should meet my needs at least for the next 3 years, at which point I can either scrap most of it and re-use the case for a more premium build (I think the power supply will probably be enough as well given the direction of the industry regarding power efficiency?) or if I'm cash strapped this build still has some room for upgrade.
One thing you might want to add are a cpu cooler as im pretty sure the stock ryzen cooler won't fit.
 
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