Building my first PC - Need Tom's Hardware community stamp of approval

Aug 8, 2018
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Hey guys, bout to soon dive into the hot mess of stress that is building my first PC. Did a bunch of research and wanted to get the community's blessing before going ahead and buying the parts (w/in a month at the latest).

PCPartPicker part list: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/8DTJgw

CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 2600 3.4GHz 6-Core Processor
CPU Cooler: Noctua - NH-U14S 55.0 CFM CPU Cooler
Motherboard: MSI - B450 TOMAHAWK ATX AM4 Motherboard
Memory: Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-2666 Memory
Storage: ADATA - XPG GAMMIX S11 480GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive
Storage: Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive
Video Card: EVGA - GeForce GTX 1080 8GB Superclocked Gaming ACX 3.0 Video Card
Case: Fractal Design - Meshify C White TG ATX Mid Tower Case
Power Supply: EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 850W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply
Case Fan: ARCTIC - Arctic F14 PWM 77.3 CFM 140mm Fan
Case Fan: ARCTIC - Arctic F14 PWM 77.3 CFM 140mm Fan
Case Fan: ARCTIC - Arctic F14 PWM 77.3 CFM 140mm Fan
Case Fan: ARCTIC - Arctic F14 PWM 77.3 CFM 140mm Fan

I am planning on overclocking (or at least try to). My 2 main concerns/questions are:

1. Is that PSU output adequate or overkill? Is the brand decent? (Went off PCPartpicker ratings).
2. Do I need any extra parts or small knick knacks prior to building? Cables? Screws? Splitters? A 1080Ti to sacrifice to our lord and savior Gaben? I plan on getting grizzly kryonaut thermal paste and the AM4 mount for the noctua but those are the only other extra things I can think of.

Thanks in advance guys.
 
First, tell us ur budget and location(US?)

It will be helpful to know the display you will be using. If you are buying a new one, what resolution and refresh rate? Budget for that? Need keyboard, mouse, heatset? Total budget including those?

 

gondo

Distinguished
A few notes. The Meshify C comes with a 120mm on the back and a 120mm on the front. If you move the 120mm form the front to the bottom, that will leave you room for 2 140mm on the front and 2 on top. It works.

The thermal paste isn't necessary. The noctua comes with some.

As for the video card. It all depends on your monitor and what resolution your gaming at. The quality of your monitor will determine how fun your gaming is and not just the power of your video card. An old cheapo 21" monitor on a 1080ti will be garbage compared to a nice GSync 144HZ IPS 21:9 widescreen on a cheaper 1070 video card. And the package with the nicer monitor is probably cheaper with the cheaper video card. It's all about pairing the video card and monitor properly.

Don't skimp on peripherals. I've seen people build big $2000 gaming systems only to skimp on a the cheapest mouse/keyboards they can find and it just plain sux. Get a nice combo and enjoy the experience. I'd go for an I5 with good peripherals before an I7 with cheap peripherals.

Overall a very nice build. The noctua is a big chunk of air cooling which works great and is reliable but have you ever thought of liquid cooling. What I like about the liquid coolers is the small block on the CPU as opposed to a 10lb brick of copper hanging off. They are also quieter. All in one coolers are quite popular and available today that it's worth considering.

As already mentioned the power supply is overkill. A 650W would work since that system would use maybe 575W or so. But I'd up to a 750w for a bit of headroom. Unless you get a good deal on the 850 I'd save some bucks and go for the 750w. The EVGA G3 is a nice PSU.

As far as building goes everything will be included. Things to look out for. Make sure the heatsink is AMD compatible and order the mounting kit if required as you mentioned. The motherboard will include the backplate for the case so dig that out first and install it on the case. All the screws for mounting will come with the case. The motherboard comes in a silver static bag. Put the bug on the motherboard box and the motherboard on the bag to soak up any static. Never power the motherboard this way since the back conducts electricity and will short your board to hell. With the motherboard out install the RAM, CPU, m.2 hard drive and heatsink. Install the studs in the case to match the motherboard holes then grab the motherboard by the noctua heatsink and carefully slide it into the case and against the backplate without scraping the board against the mounting studs. Screw it in place. That's it. Install the rest such as the video card, PSU, case cabling, etc... and your done.

That motherboard has 4 fan headers + the CPU and water pump headers. You'll have 6 fans plus the CPU so you need a solution. Splitter cables or a a fan controller. I'd look into something like the Thermaltake Commander fan hub. You install it on the back of the case, run a PSU cable to power it, and run a cable to a fan header of the motherboard. Plug all 6 fans to it so all the cabling is hidden behind the motherboard tray, not in the case going to the motherboard. The single fan cable on the motherboard will control all 6 case fans. It's a necessary add on if you want 6 case fans. Be prepared for the noise.

AS far as mounting the fans go I would have the 2 front and bottom fan pulling air into the case as intake. The PSU will be pointed so the intake fan is pointed down so it doesn't affect the case cooling. The top 2 and single rear fan would point out as exhaust. I would hook the 3 intake fans (front and bottom) directly to the motherboard and have them full speed. I would then hook the 3 exhaust fans (back and top) to the fan controller and slow their speed down a bit. Remember you have 3 intake and 3 exhaust fans. Plus the video card acts as an exhaust so you have more exhaust than intake. This creates negative air pressure and wants to exhaust more air than is being provided by the intakes. This pulls extra air through cracks in the case and dust enters. What you want is massive intake from the fans at the air filters, and a bit of exhaust so all the positive air pressure gets pushed out through case cracks to prevent dust from entering. That's why you adjust the speed of the exhaust fans accordingly. Or just install less exhaust fans.

One solution is to not use the bottom case fan since it usually just gets in the way. Have the front and top fans as intake and only the rear fan as exhaust. This creates a shower of fresh air intake from top and bottom and that air will be drawn towards the back of the case to be used by the CPU and video card. If you put the top fans as exhaust, the front air intake can sometimes be drawn straight up and out of the case so the CPU and video card don't get any. More fans doesn't always equal better cooling. Proper fan placement does as well as good heatsink designs.
 
Aug 8, 2018
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Hmmmmm total budget.... maybe $1500 +/- $200 maybe? Im in the US. I already have a display in mind, MSI OPTIXG24C. I got a keyboard and mouse already and ill figure a headset sometime later down the line (my last pair hurt my ears so ive just been sticking to earbuds).
 
Aug 8, 2018
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So a 750w PSU would be better? Also my research showed that faster ram (3000Mhz maybe?) doesn't help too much in the FPS department. Is this true or what is your opinion? Ram is gonna eat alot more of my budget if I go higher.
 
Aug 8, 2018
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Alrighty:
- I'll take out the thermal paste
- Knock down the PSU to a 750w

As for use of the Noctua, from my research ppl say fans last much longer vs AIO water coolers + the risk of malfunction with water coolers is much more dangerous should it leak + higher price point = hence I'm currently staying away from AIO but if you or anyone else can make an argument for and switch around some parts to make room in the budget for one I'm all ears.

As for GPU choice I haven't really thought of that being that much dependent on what monitor I chose :/ I have my eyes on an MSI OPTIXG24C (Aiming for 144Hz 1080p).

Lastly, I chose actually the Arctic F12 PWN PST (PCPartPicker didn't show that in the list) which apparently can be daisy chained without a splitter? I looked at Amazon reviews/Q&A to double check and that's what ppl+manufacturer said. Do you have experience with these fans or confirm this as well? Also my fan layout is exactly as you said hahaha (leave to Tom's community to think the same thing!) My case comes with 2 120 so i was gonna move the front one down to the bottom and dial back the back and top to try to achieve positive pressure.

Other questions:
@tejayd mentioned look into higher freq for RAM, so like 3000Mhz? I know prices skyrocket the higher the freq is, and my research said that higher freq doesn't really do much for gaming (like 2-3+ extra FPS) but i dunno.

Many thanks @gondo
 
Aug 8, 2018
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Uh oh... is that a good thing? Or bad? what part is being bottlenecked or who's holding who back? I am targeting 1080p 144Hz gaming
 
Aug 8, 2018
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On Amazon, a 3200mhz is $38 more expensive than the 2666mhz vs 3000mhz is only $7 :/ I think I might be more incline towards the 3000mhz now
 

gondo

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As for the cooler stick with the noctua. Hestsinks are simple and trouble free and reliable. Only go liquid if you know you want it or know what your doing.

For the monitor, video card brand only matters if your going adaptive sync. Nvida for gsync amd for freesync. Read the reviews, sync is totally worth it.

The 1060 or radeon 580 is perfect for 1080p so your msi monitor is perfect. As for bottlenecking don't fret. The ryzen 5 will do fine. An 7 may be a bit faster with some games but not enough to notice at 1080p.

If the fans can daisy chain you are all set. And the ram is really only important if you plan to overclock. Your not based on the mitherboard do get the better desl on ram and enjoy the system.

Look like a great 1080p machine and a great value. Pretty damn close to what i would build.
 
Aug 8, 2018
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Welp, I'm pretty glad to hear that! I guess I have the community's blessings then to go through with then unless anyone else has other input. Pretty stoked to get this happening. Thanks again everyone!
 
i would suggest this :

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: Intel - Core i7-8700K 3.7GHz 6-Core Processor ($347.00 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master - MasterAir MA620P TUF Gaming Edition 53.4 CFM CPU Cooler ($49.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus - TUF Z370 Plus Gaming ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($137.40 @ OutletPC)
Memory: Team - Night Hawk RGB 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($159.89 @ OutletPC)
Storage: Crucial - MX500 500GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($89.95 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate - Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($57.89 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: PowerColor - Radeon RX VEGA 56 8GB Red Dragon Video Card ($469.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design - Meshify C Dark TG ATX Mid Tower Case ($96.78 @ Walmart)
Power Supply: EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 650W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($69.89 @ OutletPC)
Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit ($94.89 @ OutletPC)
Case Fan: Cooler Master - MasterFan Pro 120 Air Balance RGB (3 pack) w/RGB Controller 42.7 CFM 120mm Fans ($34.99 @ Newegg)
Monitor: AOC - C3583FQ 35.0" 2560x1080 160Hz Monitor ($354.89 @ OutletPC)
Total: $1963.55
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-08-12 00:33 EDT-0400

the max fps the 2600 can pump tops at 100. thats a 44 fps deficit which ur freesync has to cover. the 8700k will push that to 130 if u overclock it to 4.9-5.0ghz.

the gtx 1060/rx580 is a gpu for 1080p 60/75hz display, not for 144hz. if u run the mag screen with the rx580, u will be constantly running at the lower spectrum of freesync. simply put, ur monitor is underutilized here.

since u said u wanted the msi mag display, suggested a similar curved high refresh rate display.
 

gondo

Distinguished
I just noticed you speced a 1080 video card. Overkill for 1080p. You could drop to a 1070 and get a faster cpu or better monitor with gsync.

A ryzen 2600 will bottleneck a bit at 1080p. At 1440p or above it wont since the gpu works so hard. Its basically a 10% loss at worst and not in all games.
 
^ not true when a 1080 can handle 2k 144hz just fine. if it were a 1070, then yes, gpu @ 100% and no bottleneck.

@bmockeg 1070ti and 1080 are retailing at 450 mark, so if OP wishes, wont be an issue. since the display is freesync and vega 64 is 570ish, went with the vega 56.
 
Aug 8, 2018
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Hrrrrmmmmmm...

@Lucky_SLS and @gondo I went with the ryzen 5 2600 cuz of the price and the massive price jump to an i7 8700k is a bit much. I'm looking at some i5s (I guess the 8600k), would that good enough not to bottleneck my GPU? Also kinda dumb to say that I'm went with the 1080 to kind of future proof myself but since the 1180/2080 or w/e it's called coming out soon it's kinda moot. I'm also not really tied to NVIDIA, personally would love to support AMD but from what I found their GPUs haven't been up to snuff vs NVIDIA.

Also does it matter that I match my GPU to my monitor's "sync-branded feature?" If I could I'd get no "sync" thingy if it means a cheaper price but since at the price point of the msi optixg24c all monitors have their allegiance, I just rolled with that one cuz of the reviews and price.

But I guess the main problem from ur guys' responses is that my CPU is holding back my 1080 which is resulting in loss of performance on my GPU, correct? I'd like to stick with the 1080 if possible. I didn't really research much of mobos on intel's side, was too focused on all of AMD's mobos so I'm kind of clueless of what's a good equivalent of the b450 tomahawk in terms of features and price.

Many thanks again guys, I really appreciate
 

gondo

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I would not hesitate on that Ryzen 2600. It's a good CPU.

As for adaptive sync. GSync charges a $200 premium or so because the manufacturer has to install some hardware in the monitor. Freesync is just a programing change to the HDMI protocol or something related. That's why freesync is so popular and cheap and why Intel and televisions are supporting Freesync and not GSync.

The problem I had with Freesync for a while is that AMD only had the RX580 video card so it was really only good for 1080p. NVidia had the good video cards. Now the Vega 56 and 64 are competing with the 1070 and 1080 video cards so Freesync is a viable option. The only real problem is the Vegas use more power. Other than that they arn't bad.

Some people are serious NVidia fans and are willing to pay a premium for a GSync monitor and there is no problem with that because it really does perform great. Other people are anti Intel and NVidia and don't like huge corporations and monopolies so they like to support AMD. And the rest just go with what is recommended on websites and what the best value is at the time of purchase.

As far as sync itself goes it's a great technology and works amazing. Definitely not a fad. I would go with a Vega and Freesync before I went NVidia without a GSync monitor. I wouldn't be scared to use a Vega 56 instead of a 64 and save some cash. It's a great performer for 1080p. Heck the RX580 is designed for 1080p so the Vega 56 will only drive 1080p at high frame rates. And you can get Freesync. By the time that Vega is obsolete with 1080p it'll be years away and you can just get another video card. Don't worry about future proofing.

If your thinking of maybe upgrading to a 1440p or a widescreen monitor in the future maybe now is the time to think about that and skip the 1080p monitor.

 
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@gondo Man.... gave me a lot to think about now ever since I saw the notification for your reply. Now a handful of hours into researching my brain is going dead. Jokes aside:

In regards to a 1440p monitor, it's like $100+ add on from what I've seen and I think I'd prefer a 144Hz 1080p monitor due to that right now. Also, a higher refresh rate would make screen less noticable vs 60Hz monitor, correct? Hence I'm not too worried about matching a GPU up with the monitor's sync feature. Also screen tearing occurs if the FPS is way higher than the refresh rate, right?

I did look at several threads and articles bout the vega 56, but too many of them come to the conclusion of the vega 56 underperforming vs the 1080. I tried looking up then-and-now articles to see if driver updates brought the 56 up to striking distance of the 1080 but they mostly fell short and landed within the 1070. Also prices for the 56 is are similar as a 1080, making the 56 even less appealing at this time.
I tried to follow a little rabbit hole about undervolting a 56 to beat/reach a 1080 stock or something but got really confused and gave up.

Additional arguments I've read about 1080p is that it's only old games like LoL or CS:GO where 1440p could still reach +144fps but more modern games still drag fps below 144 due to developers pushing the envelope.

I guess segueing back to my concern about my CPU potential to bottleneck my GPU, that would look like higher CPU load vs GPU load correct? I found this, albeit it's 2015: https://www.pcgamer.com/will-your-cpu-bottleneck-your-graphics-card/2/
If that article/concept still rings true, I just need to make sure the GPU load is higher than the CPU while keeping the CPU below 70% while gaming. Thus pumping up the graphic settings + OC CPU -> higher GPU load vs CPU -> keep FPS as close to 144 as possible -> I'm okay? Unless I'm misunderstanding all this.

Honestly it's starting to feel like all this information and research is becoming a blur, idk if I'm actually making a point for my build now or why I even bothered to explain this if you know this already... I guess to confirm I'm understanding the reason for everyone's recommendations. Ultimately, I'll prob get a 1440p monitor in future but research dictates not right now.

I'm very grateful for everyone's input and am still open to suggestions for changes but again, my brain is very overwhelmed now... May have to dumb down explanations to me...
 
I would advise you to get ur target experience fixed first. If you want 144hz, Intel is the go to option.
Cpu :
8600k would be fine for 120fps, 8700k for 144fps.
Gpu :
1080p 144hz : NV : 1070 AMD : Vega 56
1080p ultrawide 160hz : NV : 1070ti /1080 or Vega 64 ideally. Vega 56 may give around 120fps.

There is a middle ground :

LG has those 1080p ultrawide 75hz monitors (would advice you to get the 34" one)

For the 1080p ultrawide 75hz, a ryzen 2600X and RX 580 would do.

You can buy the cooler later if ur cpu doesn't boost consistently to 4.2ghz in gaming. Kept the same AOC monitor. Change the refresh rate to 75hz and play to avoid stuttering or repeated frames:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 2600X 3.6GHz 6-Core Processor ($225.79 @ OutletPC)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master - MasterAir MA620P TUF Gaming Edition 53.4 CFM CPU Cooler ($49.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus - TUF B450-PLUS GAMING ATX AM4 Motherboard ($118.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: GeIL - SUPER LUCE RGB SYNC 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($170.88 @ OutletPC)
Storage: Crucial - MX500 500GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($89.95 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate - Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($57.89 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: XFX - Radeon RX 580 8GB GTS XXX ED Video Card ($249.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Fractal Design - Meshify C Dark TG ATX Mid Tower Case ($101.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 650W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($88.59 @ SuperBiiz)
Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit ($94.89 @ OutletPC)
Case Fan: Cooler Master - MasterFan Pro 120 Air Balance RGB (3 pack) w/RGB Controller 42.7 CFM 120mm Fans ($34.99 @ Newegg)
Monitor: AOC - C3583FQ 35.0" 2560x1080 160Hz Monitor ($354.89 @ OutletPC)
Total: $1638.82
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-08-13 01:15 EDT-0400
 

gondo

Distinguished
Your not trying to hit 144fps. Your getting a monitor at 144hz so anything over 60fps you can take advantage of. Anything under 144fps is where sync will kick in. And you use a frame limiter to limit a game from ever going over 144fps and causing problems. Without Gsync or Freesync you need to use VSync and that causes input lag so competitive gamers don't like this.

But really a Geforce 1080 with a 1080p monitor is kind of a waste. A 1440p monitor gives so much more real estate in game. It's really only cartoony games like overwatch where you'll hit 144fps anyways. If you're going to pay big $$$ for a video card why not use it and get the monitor. Don't say you're gonna spend hundreds now so you can enjoy it in 2 years for future proofing. You might as well just get a Geforce 1060 or 1070 to game at 1080p. With computers there is no future proofing. You spend the money now and enjoy the hell out of it because in 2-3 years it's worth nothing.

And you're right the nvidia cards are better now. If you can't afford the gsync don't fret it. About the cpu, you have a budget so if you cant swing an i7 or amd equivalent its not the end of the world.

I don't understand the big concern over CPU. Saying a certain CPU is limited to 120fps is nonsense. You're not going to hit that anyways in many games because the video cards just aren't capable. What may happen is a minor bottleneck where you loose anywhere from 0-10% FPS. So 90fps instead of 100fps with an I5 over an I7. But in no way will an I5 limit you to 120fps or whatever. Play overwatch and you'll be hitting 240fps with an I5 or Ryzen 2600. It's based on the game, and it's a minor fps hit based on how CPU intensive the game is not really the bottleneck.

If the CPU was really a bottleneck you would have a FPS hit in every game. That's not the case. Modern games are very CPU intensive compared to years ago so in some games an I7 will perform better than an I5 and that's a fact, regardless of video card. But in many games you'll get the same performance.

If you're a competitive FPS player and need to see every glare and frame, then that's when sync becomes very important. If you can live with the odd lost frame you'll never notice don't worry about it. If you can live with 95fps and not 100fps don't worry about it. The point of a 144Hz monitor is to take advantage of everything over 60fps. Some people sweat because their fps hits 80 and they know they could get 87 if they swapped CPU. Common you won't notice a difference in real world. As long as you consistently never dip below 45fps you'll have a great experience.

So my opinion is I wouldn't worry about the CPU unless you're very anal or have a high budget. Now what would be nice is if you could hit a store and test sync vs no sync in a game. Then you could determine if it's worth the cost.

My opinion is the fps difference between a Geforce card and Radeon card is minimal. Nothing you'll really notice in the real world. But no sync vs sync, you notice. Sync is just so smooth. So I think if the budget was super tight, I would go with a Radeon video card and a freesync monitor just to get freesync. I may get a hit in FPS but I can live with 80fps instead of 90fps. At least I'll have sync and have a better experience than the guy gaming at 90fps. As for the CPU, yes an I7 might be faster and give me an extra 5-10fps in some games. But will I notice the extra 10fps? If I was struggling to hit 40fps maybe I might, but form 80 to 90 not really. Is it worth the extra money to me to purchase the I7 is what I would consider.

Another thing to consider is what is more important to spend $200 on. An upgrade to an I7 or an upgrade to the next tier of video card? Will a better video card and an I5 perform better than a wose video card on an I7. Definitely not. With your budget stick to the Geforce 1070/1080 and the I5 will perform fine. If you really want to enjoy your games consider the ultra wide screen LG or a 1440p monitor. The extra space in game is amazing.
 
Aug 8, 2018
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@Lucky_SLS and @gondo

Thanks for continuing to humor me. So after more research, I decided to bite the bullet and go specifically for Powercolor Vega 56 Red Dragon due to the ability to flash in a the vega 64 BIOS i believe (more bang for the buck). Also I keep on chirping about 144Hz but I don't know how "wow'd" I'd be especially it part of the bump to the price. What's your thoughts on (or other ppl as well), 144Hz > or < 1440p? I guess it still falls on me what I'm aiming for...

I will say that the LG 29WK600-W looks pretty nice (only 1080p and has to OC to achieve maybe 75Hz ). Another model, the LG 29UM68-P, a reviewer mentioned he was able to OC to 120Hz which seems like a massive jump from 60Hz (most OC I've read goes to 75-85ish?) Anyways, I don't know how I missed this but I found the AOC AGON AG241QX 23.8” Gaming Monitor, while trying to look for a 1440p + 144Hz monitor (and looking at some ultrawide monitors @Lucky_SLS recommended). 1440p, 144Hz, and freesync to go with my vega 56. I also changed my CPU cooler to the arctic freezer 33 esports ed. (cheaper and I don't have to buy the AM4 mount).

So I'm gucci now? My build is now:
PCPartPicker part list: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/KQ6pzY
Price breakdown by merchant: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/KQ6pzY/by_merchant/

CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 2600 3.4GHz 6-Core Processor ($165.99 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: ARCTIC - Freezer 33 eSports Edition (Black/White) CPU Cooler ($44.89 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: MSI - B450 TOMAHAWK ATX AM4 Motherboard ($109.99 @ B&H)
Memory: Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($174.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: ADATA - XPG GAMMIX S11 480GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($139.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($43.89 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: PowerColor - Radeon RX VEGA 56 8GB Video Card
Case: Fractal Design - Meshify C White TG ATX Mid Tower Case ($89.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Power Supply: EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 750W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($89.99 @ Amazon)
Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit ($94.89 @ OutletPC)
Case Fan: ARCTIC - Arctic F14 PWM 77.3 CFM 140mm Fan ($8.75 @ OutletPC)
Case Fan: ARCTIC - Arctic F14 PWM 77.3 CFM 140mm Fan ($8.75 @ OutletPC)
Case Fan: ARCTIC - Arctic F14 PWM 77.3 CFM 140mm Fan ($8.75 @ OutletPC)
Case Fan: ARCTIC - Arctic F14 PWM 77.3 CFM 140mm Fan ($8.75 @ OutletPC)
Monitor: AOC - AG241QX 23.8" 2560x1440 144Hz Monitor ($264.49 @ Walmart)
Total: $1734.10 = $1254.10 + $480 (Vega 56)
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-08-13 08:34 EDT-0400

Price didn't really change for all my scraping... But I'm concerned again about my PSU since changing the GPU to the Vega 56 (est. draw is 419w), is 750w still ok even with my planned BIOS flashing (I think I read increased power draw after the flash since it's trying to mimic the 64).

Thanks again guys
 

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