Question Burned gpu capacitor

Mar 16, 2021
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Hello guys, first of all, excuse me for any mistakes in english and for the big text.

I would like to come here to ask for help related to my Asus GTX 750TI. I was using the computer normally, and then it restarted unexpectedly and I could see a light and smell of burning coming from the gpu card. I turned off the pc and opened the board, and I noticed that this capacitor right above the pci connector (tantalum capacitor I think) is burnt out (I would even say it cut in half haha).

The problem is that the card continues to function normally, but I haven't used it since, for fear of making the situation worse. However, I will only be able to send it for repair at the end of the month.

What do guys say? Is it an important capacitor? Should I really wait to change this component before using it again? Again, thank you for reading this far and forgive me for any meaningless question.


 

Jacozeelie

Respectable
Mar 1, 2019
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1,970
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If you can, or a friend. Replace the cap with exact same value.

I have used mobo's with blown caps around the cpu that worked without problems. Its up to you. A cap filters out noise and tiny spikes in power.
 
Reactions: JonathanCrazy

Krotow

Commendable
Oct 2, 2019
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Ceramic SMD capacitors are notorious as shorting themselves over time. Better brands are less affected but they usually appear only in high end cards. Your piece of cinder seems was used for noise filtering in 3.3V or 5V rail. If card works, carefully remove it, clean board with isopropyl and don't bother anymore. Obviously better replace it to new one. 10 uF 16V one should suffice.
 
Reactions: JonathanCrazy

InvalidError

Titan
Moderator
If the card is still under warranty, set it aside until you get the repaired one back.

If it isn't, remove the dead capacitor, clean the area as well as you can to reduce the likelihood that power may short to ground via charred remains, examine the area for potential shorts - don't want to risk bridging power to ground by attempting to solder a new cap in if a piece of PCB covering a ground plane crumbled away. If there is exposed copper that shouldn't be exposed, cover it with solder mask resin before soldering a replacement capacitor on top.

If you choose to have it repaired by a shop, make sure to get an estimate up-front, the repair could end up costing more than a new GT1030 if the shop is greedy.
 
Reactions: JonathanCrazy
Mar 16, 2021
5
0
10
0
If the card is still under warranty, set it aside until you get the repaired one back.

If it isn't, remove the dead capacitor, clean the area as well as you can to reduce the likelihood that power may short to ground via charred remains, examine the area for potential shorts - don't want to risk bridging power to ground by attempting to solder a new cap in if a piece of PCB covering a ground plane crumbled away. If there is exposed copper that shouldn't be exposed, cover it with solder mask resin before soldering a replacement capacitor on top.

If you choose to have it repaired by a shop, make sure to get an estimate up-front, the repair could end up costing more than a new GT1030 if the shop is greedy.
I am a layman with changing components like that, so I prefer to take them to a store. Using it with blown capacitors is not a good idea, is it?
 
Mar 16, 2021
5
0
10
0
Ceramic SMD capacitors are notorious as shorting themselves over time. Better brands are less affected but they usually appear only in high end cards. Your piece of cinder seems was used for noise filtering in 3.3V or 5V rail. If card works, carefully remove it, clean board with isopropyl and don't bother anymore. Obviously better replace it to new one. 10 uF 16V one should suffice.
ok man, thanks for the reply, appreciate
 

InvalidError

Titan
Moderator
Using it with blown capacitors is not a good idea, is it?
Not without at least cleaning and securing the area to make sure it won't randomly arc over at some future time.

The GPU may not meet EMI regulations without the cap, so there is a very slight chance you may get a fine if the GPU ends up interfering with something and it gets traced to your PC. If the PC has an all-metal case (no windows) though, that chance should be extremely low.
 
Mar 16, 2021
5
0
10
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Not without at least cleaning and securing the area to make sure it won't randomly arc over at some future time.

The GPU may not meet EMI regulations without the cap, so there is a very slight chance you may get a fine if the GPU ends up interfering with something and it gets traced to your PC. If the PC has an all-metal case (no windows) though, that chance should be extremely low.
ok, so I think I'm going to take it to the store so I don't take any risks
 

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