[SOLVED] Buying Olympus E500 in 2020?

Jun 15, 2020
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So I am thinking of finally buying my first DSLR camera.
Yeah, it needs to be DSLR. Im done with compact cameras that have almost none adjustment.
So I basically know nothing about DSLR-s. Only basic stuff. But I would love to start learning because I think it may be benefitial for my future job- Web design.
My budget is very low and I don't want to spend too much for a camera that may dissapoint me in future. I don't really need video recording feature but It will be nice to have atleast HD video with stabilization so I can practice with it.

But in the end I want camera that will make really nice and clean photos with nice bokeh effect so I can play with it. I mostly shoot people and nature at day time.
I found Olympus camera for like 60$ with 2 lenses and bag. Is it a good deal or should I save up some money for something better with video option?
 
The price doesn't actually seem too bad considering it comes with two (probably kit) lenses, but it would probably be better to look for something at least a few years newer. That model came out in 2005, which was only a couple years after "semi-reasonably priced" DSLRs started appearing on the market. So, it was still the early years for DSLRs, when features and specifications were improving substantially from one year to the next. As such, there are a number of features on modern cameras (or even 2005-era digital point and shoot cameras) that you may take for granted that will be missing.

Looking over the specs, most notably that camera lacks "live-view", meaning you can't frame shots using the LCD, and must use the through-lens optical viewfinder instead. Many professional photographers might be fine with that, but if its your first time coming to a DSLR, it probably won't be particularly comfortable, and looking through a viewfinder is not always going to be practical. That feature is common on newer DSLRs, and many compact models now do away with the optical viewfinder entirely. Also, there's no video support, a feature that tends to be common on newer models. And a lot of other smaller features are likely to be missing as well.
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
So I am thinking of finally buying my first DSLR camera.
Yeah, it needs to be DSLR. Im done with compact cameras that have almost none adjustment.
So I basically know nothing about DSLR-s. Only basic stuff. But I would love to start learning because I think it may be benefitial for my future job- Web design.
My budget is very low and I don't want to spend too much for a camera that may dissapoint me in future. I don't really need video recording feature but It will be nice to have atleast HD video with stabilization so I can practice with it.

But in the end I want camera that will make really nice and clean photos with nice bokeh effect so I can play with it. I mostly shoot people and nature at day time.
I found Olympus camera for like 60$ with 2 lenses and bag. Is it a good deal or should I save up some money for something better with video option?
It could be a 15 year old camera. It got good reviews. $60 is awful cheap. It is hard to say, might be a dteal, might be junk.
 
Jun 15, 2020
13
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Seller told he doesn't know the value of it but he knows it works fine.
What used camera should I consider buying for price up to 100$?
 
I'd pass on the e500 tbh, at this point, the image quality, iso performance and autofocus are all subpar. I picked up a lumix G1 a year ago just for fun for $30, it's fun to use but the image quality is quite poor under all but the perfectly lit conditions. The oly e-500 is worse than that.

It's really the lenses that will kill the wallet. If you're patient, you can use inexpensive manual lenses to great effect paired with an older mirrorless body. I'd say keep an eye out for a sony nex body ~$60-$70 and adapt a old manual 28mm f2.8 or 50mm f1.8 lens to it.
 
The price doesn't actually seem too bad considering it comes with two (probably kit) lenses, but it would probably be better to look for something at least a few years newer. That model came out in 2005, which was only a couple years after "semi-reasonably priced" DSLRs started appearing on the market. So, it was still the early years for DSLRs, when features and specifications were improving substantially from one year to the next. As such, there are a number of features on modern cameras (or even 2005-era digital point and shoot cameras) that you may take for granted that will be missing.

Looking over the specs, most notably that camera lacks "live-view", meaning you can't frame shots using the LCD, and must use the through-lens optical viewfinder instead. Many professional photographers might be fine with that, but if its your first time coming to a DSLR, it probably won't be particularly comfortable, and looking through a viewfinder is not always going to be practical. That feature is common on newer DSLRs, and many compact models now do away with the optical viewfinder entirely. Also, there's no video support, a feature that tends to be common on newer models. And a lot of other smaller features are likely to be missing as well.
 
Jun 15, 2020
13
1
15
0
And problem is I can't see that camera before buying so that is not the best idea. Even if I can see it I don't really know on what things should I look at. In my life I was holding DSLR maybe 2 times for like 5 minutes so I can't really have knowledge about them.

Yeah, I can see it is really expensive hobby that maybe I will give up on later and market in my place for cameras almost doesn't exist. Spending 250$ for my first used camera doesn't sound good to me but that is all I can find in my place. I think these cameras are overpriced.
 
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kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
And problem is I can't see that camera before buying so that is not the best idea. Even if I can see it I don't really know on what things should I look at. In my life I was holding DSLR maybe 2 times for like 5 minutes so I can't really have knowledge about them.

Yeah, I can see it is really expensive hobby that maybe I will give up on later and market in my place for cameras almost doesn't exist. Spending 250$ for my first used camera doesn't sound good to me but that is all I can find in my place. I think these cameras are overpriced.
What to look for. Does it write to the compact flash card correctly. Does it focus automatically. Does it expose a fully lit (sun at your back) scene correctly. Does the build-in flash work. Do all the dials work. Does the LCD panel work. Does the battery compartment latch closed. Does the lens come off easily after unlatching. Are there any visible particulates inside the lens. Are there scratches on the front of the lens.
 

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