Question Cable not connected? For my sapphire pulse.

ZenoZ43

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Just plugged in my new sapphire pulse radeon rx vega 56. I also plugged in vga cables to both slots. I go to turn on the monitor and it says cable not connected. I'm not sure what the problem is.
 

ZenoZ43

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Oct 31, 2016
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Please provide FULL PC specs first of all. Which GPU and PSU is that ? Which cable did you plug in, PCI-E ?
i5-6500
Gigabyte GA-Z170-HD3P
16GB DDR4 2400 RAM
2TB HDD
250GB SSD
Sapphire pulse RX Vega 55 8GB HDMI2
EVGA 650 W 80+ Gold PSU

The cables i plugged into the graphics card are 8 pin and say evga on them. I assume thats just because of the power supply brand
 
You mean to say one of these ? Anyways, do you have the latest BIOS installed on your system ? Try to clear and reset the CMOS/BIOS settings to factory defaults, and then try again , if need be.

I think your GPU requires TWO 8-PIN cables.

 

ZenoZ43

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Oct 31, 2016
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You mean to say one of these ? Anyways, do you have the latest BIOS installed on your system ? Try to clear and reset the CMOS/BIOS settings to factory defaults, and then try again , if need be.

I think your GPU requires TWO 8-PIN cables.

Yeah those. I have them plugged into both of the slots
 

ZenoZ43

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Oct 31, 2016
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You mean to say one of these ? Anyways, do you have the latest BIOS installed on your system ? Try to clear and reset the CMOS/BIOS settings to factory defaults, and then try again , if need be.

I think your GPU requires TWO 8-PIN cables.

I also have no idea what you mean by cmos or bios
 
Okay, sorry. Let me explain.

The BIOS (or Basic Input/Output System) is a firmware stored in a chip on your computer's motherboard. It is the FIRST program that runs when you turn on your computer.

The BIOS performs the POST, which initializes and tests your computer's hardware. Then it locates and runs your boot loader, or loads your operating system directly. The BIOS also provides a simple interface for configuring your computer's hardware. When you start your computer, you may see a message like "Press F2 or something similar, for setup." This setup is your BIOS configuration interface.

When you make changes to your BIOS configuration, the settings are NOT stored on the BIOS chip itself. Instead, they are stored on a special memory chip, which is referred to as "the CMOS." CMOS stands for "Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor."

Like most RAM chips, the chip that stores your BIOS settings is manufactured using the CMOS process. It holds a small amount of data, usually 256 bytes. The information on the CMOS chip includes what types of disk drives are installed on your computer, the current date and time of your system clock, and your computer's boot sequence.

On some motherboards, the CMOS is a separate chip. However, on most modern motherboards, it is integrated with the RTC (real-time clock) on the southbridge.

Your BIOS memory is non-volatile: it retains its information even when your computer has no power because your computer needs to remember its BIOS settings even when it's turned off. That's why the CMOS has its own dedicated power source, which is the CMOS battery.
 

ZenoZ43

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Oct 31, 2016
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Okay, sorry. Let me explain.

The BIOS (Basic Input/Output System) is firmware stored in a chip on your computer's motherboard. It is the first program that runs when you turn on your computer.

The BIOS performs the POST, which initializes and tests your computer's hardware. Then it locates and runs your boot loader, or loads your operating system directly. The BIOS also provides a simple interface for configuring your computer's hardware. When you start your computer, you may see a message like "Press F2 or something similar, for setup." This setup is your BIOS configuration interface.

When you make changes to your BIOS configuration, the settings are NOT stored on the BIOS chip itself. Instead, they are stored on a special memory chip, which is referred to as "the CMOS." CMOS stands for "Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor."

Like most RAM chips, the chip that stores your BIOS settings is manufactured using the CMOS process. It holds a small amount of data, usually 256 bytes. The information on the CMOS chip includes what types of disk drives are installed on your computer, the current date and time of your system clock, and your computer's boot sequence.

On some motherboards, the CMOS is a separate chip. However, on most modern motherboards, it is integrated with the RTC (real-time clock) on the southbridge.

Your BIOS memory is non-volatile: it retains its information even when your computer has no power because your computer needs to remember its BIOS settings even when it's turned off. That's why the CMOS has its own dedicated power source, which is the CMOS battery.
So i need to reset those to make the cable connection problem work?
 
NO, it's not always necessary to reset/clear those settings. I was just suggesting an alternative solution, just in case all other troubleshooting steps fail.

Though, it would be better at least you have the latest BIOS installed on your PC
 

ZenoZ43

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NO, it's not always necessary to reset/clear those settings. I was just suggesting an alternative solution, just in case all other troubleshooting steps fail.
My old graphics card died and thats why i have this new one. But the old graphics card was giving me a no display message when i went to turn on the computer. After taking out the old card and plugging the monitors into the motherboard they worked fine. Idk if that helps
 
My old graphics card died and thats why i have this new one. But the old graphics card was giving me a no display message when i went to turn on the computer. After taking out the old card and plugging the monitors into the motherboard they worked fine. Idk if that helps
I'm not sure if I understand you correctly, but you mean to say, when you plug the Monitor's cable to the onboard graphics/iGPU, then the system works fine ?

So, this was a problem even with your OLD graphics card ? Exact same system behavior ? Do you have the latest BIOS ?
 
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ZenoZ43

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I'm not sure if I understand you correctly, but you mean to say, when you plug the Monitor's cable to the onbaord graphics/iGPU, then the system works fine ?

So, this was a problem even with your OLD graphics card ? Exact same system behavior ? Do you have the latest BIOS ?
Yes its a similar problem. Except with the OLD graphics card my monitor said no signal. With the NEW one the monitor says cable not connected. I also have no clue if i have the latest bios
 

ZenoZ43

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From your description this sounds more like a Motherboard issue, or some problem with the PCI-E slot itself. Or, could it be a bad/faulty cable connection from your Monitor ?
Just finished making sure everything is plugged in correctly and now instead of the message i was just getting, im getting the no display message.
 

ZenoZ43

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Yes, you have already told this before as well. The onboard graphics seem to work, but not the discrete GPU.
So i unplugged the graphics card and ran the computer normally. Then disabled the onboard graphics and plugged the graphics card again. The computer works now! Unfortunately i am getting high frames in games but am still lagging and the fans dont spin anymore. What happened
 

exploding_psu

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So i unplugged the graphics card and ran the computer normally. Then disabled the onboard graphics and plugged the graphics card again. The computer works now! Unfortunately i am getting high frames in games but am still lagging and the fans dont spin anymore. What happened
Mind if I chime in? I run the exact same card as yours. For the fan situation, I think it's normal. The heatsinks on this card is so heavy the fans rarely spin. I can play games for 3 hours straight without the fan spinning even once. But to make sure, you can manually fire up the fan through the Radeon Software (radeon settings? Something like that) just to make sure the fan isn't dead

For the lagging, driver? Mine was a stuttery mess before I updated the driver, it was a day and night difference..

EDIT : removed the part of my post that has nothing to do with the query, my bad
 
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ZenoZ43

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Oct 31, 2016
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Mind if I chime in? I run the exact same card as yours. For the fan situation, I think it's normal. The heatsinks on this card is so heavy the fans rarely spin. I can play games for 3 hours straight without the fan spinning even once. But to make sure, you can manually fire up the fan through the Radeon Software (radeon settings? Something like that) just to make sure the fan isn't dead

For the lagging, driver? Mine was a stuttery mess before I updated the driver, it was a day and night difference..

EDIT : removed the part of my post that has nothing to do with the query, my bad
Whuch driver update are you on where it works fine? At what point do your gpu fans typically turn on?
 

exploding_psu

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Jul 17, 2018
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Whuch driver update are you on where it works fine? At what point do your gpu fans typically turn on?
I'm on 19.5.2 Adrenalin 2019 with Driver Packaging Version
19.10.15.05-190522a-342855C-RadeonSoftwareAdrenalin2019 (at least that's what the software told me, I say just install whatever is the latest one).

The fans only spins during benchmarking sessions, and when the PC is booting.
 

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