[SOLVED] Cable TV (Coax) Wireless connection to a TV

HorridJohn

Distinguished
Mar 3, 2011
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Hello. I did a search for this and came up empty. I apologize if I was asking the question wrong.
This is likely to be a case where the answer is simply "No." but it seems conceptually easy.
The short version:
I want to take a standard Coax Cable signal change it into a wireless signal; receive the signal; process it back into a Coax Cable Signal and connect it to a TV.
Longer version:
I have a standard (Coax) cable jack (with service) in one room. I have a TV in another room. Running cable in between is not an option. Distance is less than 10 meters.
I want to convert the incoming Cable Signal to a wireless signal and then receive the wireless signal, and convert it back into a suitable Coax cable signal and connect the feed to the Coax jack on the TV.
Superficially, this seems really simple. Apparently, it is not.
I am guessing that the Coax is carrying a very large (RF) signal and converting it to a Wireless (Radio) signal and back "should not" be a problem. I have found solutions that will send 1 channel, but nothing that allows the person watching TV to change the channel without a send/receive adapter for the remote to switch the single channel broadcast. [It reminds me of trying to record Cable TV back in the 80s.]
You would think that simply amplifying the (already RF) Cable signal and receiving it 30 feet away on an antenna would work or setting up a low power transmitter/receiver link on a different frequency would fit the bill. However, I do not see any consumer device capable of doing so (for less than $200.00).
Is there around this issue or are my options: Run Cable. Move the TV or Do without. ??
Thank you.
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
Hello. I did a search for this and came up empty. I apologize if I was asking the question wrong.
This is likely to be a case where the answer is simply "No." but it seems conceptually easy.
The short version:
I want to take a standard Coax Cable signal change it into a wireless signal; receive the signal; process it back into a Coax Cable Signal and connect it to a TV.
Longer version:
I have a standard (Coax) cable jack (with service) in one room. I have a TV in another room. Running cable in between is not an option. Distance is less than 10 meters.
I want to convert the incoming Cable Signal to a wireless signal and then receive the wireless signal, and convert it back into a suitable Coax cable signal and connect the feed to the Coax jack on the TV.
Superficially, this seems really simple. Apparently, it is not.
I am guessing that the Coax is carrying a very large (RF) signal and converting it to a Wireless (Radio) signal and back "should not" be a problem. I have found solutions that will send 1 channel, but nothing that allows the person watching TV to change the channel without a send/receive adapter for the remote to switch the single channel broadcast. [It reminds me of trying to record Cable TV back in the 80s.]
You would think that simply amplifying the (already RF) Cable signal and receiving it 30 feet away on an antenna would work or setting up a low power transmitter/receiver link on a different frequency would fit the bill. However, I do not see any consumer device capable of doing so (for less than $200.00).
Is there around this issue or are my options: Run Cable. Move the TV or Do without. ??
Thank you.
Not possible. For a single channel, maybe. For the 100s of different frequencies carried on a cable company coax? Nope.
 
Reactions: HorridJohn

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
Hello. I did a search for this and came up empty. I apologize if I was asking the question wrong.
This is likely to be a case where the answer is simply "No." but it seems conceptually easy.
The short version:
I want to take a standard Coax Cable signal change it into a wireless signal; receive the signal; process it back into a Coax Cable Signal and connect it to a TV.
Longer version:
I have a standard (Coax) cable jack (with service) in one room. I have a TV in another room. Running cable in between is not an option. Distance is less than 10 meters.
I want to convert the incoming Cable Signal to a wireless signal and then receive the wireless signal, and convert it back into a suitable Coax cable signal and connect the feed to the Coax jack on the TV.
Superficially, this seems really simple. Apparently, it is not.
I am guessing that the Coax is carrying a very large (RF) signal and converting it to a Wireless (Radio) signal and back "should not" be a problem. I have found solutions that will send 1 channel, but nothing that allows the person watching TV to change the channel without a send/receive adapter for the remote to switch the single channel broadcast. [It reminds me of trying to record Cable TV back in the 80s.]
You would think that simply amplifying the (already RF) Cable signal and receiving it 30 feet away on an antenna would work or setting up a low power transmitter/receiver link on a different frequency would fit the bill. However, I do not see any consumer device capable of doing so (for less than $200.00).
Is there around this issue or are my options: Run Cable. Move the TV or Do without. ??
Thank you.
Not possible. For a single channel, maybe. For the 100s of different frequencies carried on a cable company coax? Nope.
 
Reactions: HorridJohn

HorridJohn

Distinguished
Mar 3, 2011
15
0
18,510
0
Thank you. After another hour of searching around for additional information; that was the conclusion that I arrived at as well.
I do not understand wired data transmission well enough to know why it is possible to send a stream of data down a single wire that contains 100 channels of 60+ frames per second, but it cannot be re-amplified; sent; received; and viewed.
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
Thank you. After another hour of searching around for additional information; that was the conclusion that I arrived at as well.
I do not understand wired data transmission well enough to know why it is possible to send a stream of data down a single wire that contains 100 channels of 60+ frames per second, but it cannot be re-amplified; sent; received; and viewed.
It can be, but not cheaply. The frequencies are high, and amplifiers for very high frequencies are expensive.
 

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