Caltech Develops Self-Healing System for Integrated Chips

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Abion47

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I for one welcome our new Terminator overlords, just so long as they let me go back in time and get some Twinkies.
 

dalethepcman

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This is appears to be more of a "smart grid" approach, than "self healing" as this chip doesn't actually repair itself, it just attempts to route around a broken part to another part that can serve the same function.
 

danwat1234

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Do modern microprocessors x86/arm have any redundancy if a few transistors fail, or some sort of checking and rerouting to disable a 'unit' if something is clobbered in there or a section of SRAM, etc? Or no?
 

azgard

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[citation][nom]danwat1234[/nom]Do modern microprocessors x86/arm have any redundancy if a few transistors fail, or some sort of checking and rerouting to disable a 'unit' if something is clobbered in there or a section of SRAM, etc? Or no?[/citation]

A lot of designs incorporate tolerance provisioning, classic example are with GPU manufacturer's and binning of chip's as well as disabling and/or underclocking cores.
 

Vorador2

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More than self-healing, it's CRC&ECC on steroids. In any case, for the space program this is really good news, since this allows a far greater degree of redundancy on electronics.
 

Non-Euclidean

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[citation][nom]Abion47[/nom]I for one welcome our new Terminator overlords, just so long as they let me go back in time and get some Twinkies.[/citation]
No need, friend.

On March 12, 2013 it was reported, Twinkies are slated to return to store shelves by Summer 2013 after they, along with other famed Hostess Brands, were purchased out of bankruptcy by Apollo Global Management and Metropoulos & Co.
 

kenyee

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Sounds like the custom ASIC inside the chip is a single failure point. Nice that they can reroute parts of the rest though...
 

gm0n3y

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[citation][nom]kenyee[/nom]Sounds like the custom ASIC inside the chip is a single failure point. Nice that they can reroute parts of the rest though...[/citation]
Unless they build multiples ASIC units that can detect errors on one another. Of course if a unit itself is defective it might erroneously start deactivating other parts of the chip. Redundancy on the redundancy.
 

Duckhunt

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Damn fantastic. Will it be profitable?

What if they hit the power supply pin with the laser? or ground circuit attached to the pin for the ground? Can It use another pin to reroute?
 
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