[SOLVED] Can A weak GPU cause high CPU temperatures during gaming or similar tasks?

mihirl.727

Commendable
Jul 18, 2018
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1,510
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I have heard that the work of rendering and various tasks are shared between a CPU and GPU
Can an i5 9300H face higher temperature if paired with low end GTX 1050 4GB or is the CPU temp independent of GPU during gaming or any such other intense tasks?
 

Phaaze88

Polypheme
Ambassador
Yes its a Dual Fan gaming laptop but the GPU stays absolutely warm (50-60C) but the CPU skyrockets.So is the CPU weak for the task or the weak GPU causes CPU to be overloaded
Neither. Your laptop's cooling sucks.
The good gaming laptops are above the 2000USD mark, and for people who can't, or don't want to spend that much, end up paying the compromise in cooling, because it's the first sacrifice the manufacturer makes.
-plastic shells, which don't help at all
-shared heatsink
-few open vents, or lack thereof, beneath the laptop
It just doesn't work out in the long term, which is something laptop reviews can't accurately represent.

The tiny package of laptops is the greatest limitation for gaming models, and shouldn't be skimped on:
-metal, or mostly metal, shell
-cpu and gpu have their own heatsink, and they may even have an extra fan too
-half, or most of the bottom side has open vents
Expensive and has some weight to it, but that's just how it(ideal gaming laptop) is. The original laptop design wasn't intended to contain the same kind of hardware that's packed into desktops; at best, they were meant for APU systems.
 
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RealBeast

Titan
Moderator
I have heard that the work of rendering and various tasks are shared between a CPU and GPU
Can an i5 9300H face higher temperature if paired with low end GTX 1050 4GB or is the CPU temp independent of GPU during gaming or any such other intense tasks?
Not to any significant extent, in other words they are each independently cooled and having a lower "power" CPU will not cause the GPU to overheat.
 

Phaaze88

Polypheme
Ambassador
If this is for a laptop, then yes - ahh, who am I kidding, this happens in desktops too, it's just not as severe.
They heat each other up, because the cheaper models run on a shared heatsink.
The models with the separated heatsinks and triple fan coolers cost more.
 

mihirl.727

Commendable
Jul 18, 2018
12
0
1,510
0
If this is for a laptop, then yes - ahh, who am I kidding, this happens in desktops too, it's just not as severe.
They heat each other up, because the cheaper models run on a shared heatsink.
The models with the separated heatsinks and triple fan coolers cost more.
Yes its a Dual Fan gaming laptop but the GPU stays absolutely warm (50-60C) but the CPU skyrockets.So is the CPU weak for the task or the weak GPU causes CPU to be overloaded
 

Phaaze88

Polypheme
Ambassador
Yes its a Dual Fan gaming laptop but the GPU stays absolutely warm (50-60C) but the CPU skyrockets.So is the CPU weak for the task or the weak GPU causes CPU to be overloaded
Neither. Your laptop's cooling sucks.
The good gaming laptops are above the 2000USD mark, and for people who can't, or don't want to spend that much, end up paying the compromise in cooling, because it's the first sacrifice the manufacturer makes.
-plastic shells, which don't help at all
-shared heatsink
-few open vents, or lack thereof, beneath the laptop
It just doesn't work out in the long term, which is something laptop reviews can't accurately represent.

The tiny package of laptops is the greatest limitation for gaming models, and shouldn't be skimped on:
-metal, or mostly metal, shell
-cpu and gpu have their own heatsink, and they may even have an extra fan too
-half, or most of the bottom side has open vents
Expensive and has some weight to it, but that's just how it(ideal gaming laptop) is. The original laptop design wasn't intended to contain the same kind of hardware that's packed into desktops; at best, they were meant for APU systems.
 
Reactions: mihirl.727

mihirl.727

Commendable
Jul 18, 2018
12
0
1,510
0
Neither. Your laptop's cooling sucks.
The good gaming laptops are above the 2000USD mark, and for people who can't, or don't want to spend that much, end up paying the compromise in cooling, because it's the first sacrifice the manufacturer makes.
-plastic shells, which don't help at all
-shared heatsink
-few open vents, or lack thereof, beneath the laptop
It just doesn't work out in the long term, which is something laptop reviews can't accurately represent.

The tiny package of laptops is the greatest limitation for gaming models, and shouldn't be skimped on:
-metal, or mostly metal, shell
-cpu and gpu have their own heatsink, and they may even have an extra fan too
-half, or most of the bottom side has open vents
Expensive and has some weight to it, but that's just how it(ideal gaming laptop) is. The original laptop design wasn't intended to contain the same kind of hardware that's packed into desktops; at best, they were meant for APU systems.
So whether I chose GTX 1650 or GTX 1050 my HP Pavilion 15 Gaming was meant to heat up.Glad I didn't chose 1650 model cause for $120 extra I would get the same cooling.I do not game on this but was just wondering.
Kudos👍
 

Phaaze88

Polypheme
Ambassador
Nvidia crippled the original 1650 too hard; it couldn't even compete with 3 year old RX 570s and 580s. It was a hard pass, at least on the desktop, and that's why they launched the much more competitive Super variant.
I don't know how well it scales in laptops, but I'd imagine it's just as bad. None of the laptop models are afforded the same power budget as their desktop counterparts.
 

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