• Now's your chance win big! Join our community and get entered to win a RTX 2060 GPU, plus more! Join here.

    Pi Cast Episode 3 streams live on Tuesday, August 4th at 2:30 pm ET (7:30 PM BST). Watch live right here!

    Catch Scharon on the Tom's Hardware Show live on Thursday, August 6th at 2:00 pm ET (7:00 PM BST). Click here!

Question Can high end CPU air cooler get dead?

Jul 7, 2020
19
0
10
0
The high end air cooler like dark rock pro 4 and noctua nh d15 chromax can this products gets dead? If it happens then where problems occurs? Please explain
Thank you.
 

RealBeast

Titan
Moderator
The high end air cooler like dark rock pro 4 and noctua nh d15 chromax can this products gets dead? If it happens then where problems occurs? Please explain
Thank you.
If you are talking about the cooler itself, sure the fans could go out, but it is quite unlikely and you should have warnings from your computer and often hear the problem. If you mean can they damage the CPU, then:

The CPU can get too hot and if run very hot for extended periods can be damaged, but a spike temp to 100C will shut off the CPU.

This is not likely for those air coolers. Unless you have a high ambient temperature or are really pushing your overclock those coolers will do just fine for an i9-9900K for example. I would really consider an AIO for an i9-10900K that you overclock.
 
Jul 7, 2020
19
0
10
0
If you are talking about the cooler itself, sure the fans could go out, but it is quite unlikely and you should have warnings from your computer and often hear the problem. If you mean can they damage the CPU, then:

The CPU can get too hot and if run very hot for extended periods can be damaged, but a spike temp to 100C will shut off the CPU.

This is not likely for those air coolers. Unless you have a high ambient temperature or are really pushing your overclock those coolers will do just fine for an i9-9900K for example. I would really consider an AIO for an i9-10900K that you overclock.
So does only fans get affects while cooler dies? What happenes to heat sink of the cooler? Is it remains the same or it also get affect?
 

RealBeast

Titan
Moderator
They can get hot and if run very hot for extended periods can be damaged, but a spike temp to 100C will shut off the CPU. Unless you have a high ambient temperature or are really pushing your overclock those coolers will do just fine for an i9-9900K for example. I would really consider an AIO for an i9-10900K that you overclock.
So does only fans get affects while cooler dies? What happenes to heat sink of the cooler? Is it remains the same or it also get affect?
The heatsink is just a block of metal with aluminum fins attached, the fans move all the heat away from the metal sink.

A heatsink alone can passively cool some structures that produce some heat without using a fan, but a CPU needs a fan. For example some NVMe drives have a small heatsink on them without a fan as they don't produce much heat. And some memory has small aluminum covers meant to be a heatsink.
 

Phaaze88

Splendid
Ambassador
I don't know about 'just fans' with air coolers - Karadjgne has actually had a heatpipe blow up on them...
I've never had it happen to me, nor have I heard of any other case of it happening, so I can only call it a freak accident or a major QC issue.
 

Paperdoc

Glorious
Ambassador
Both CPU coolers you ask about are of the heat-pipe design. That is, it is not a simple solid metal block with fins sticking up for heat removal. Instead the heat flows through sealed pipes containing a fluid that evaporates at the hot end (on top of the CPU chip case) and then re-condenses at the cool end where the heatsink fins are fastened to those pipes. In such a system, it is hypothetically possible for the sealed pipes to fail and leak, but that is very rare as Phaaze88 has said. I see that Noctua says the heatsink fans of their unit are soldered to the pipes for permanent contact, and claim that other makers may not do this, implying that simple mechanical crimping may fail over time.

By far, the MOST likely way for such a system to fail is that the FAN motor fails, usually because its bearings wear out. Initially this can cause the fan to run too slow and make a lot of noise; eventually the fan simply stalls and never turns. This also does not happen for many years, but will eventually. Often that can be corrected simply by replacing the fan alone, and not the rest of the cooler system.

There are TWO independent systems that watch for problems with CPU cooling because that chip is so important and so expensive to replace if it is damaged by overheating. Every CPU has a temperature sensor built into the chip by the maker that feeds its reading out on one chip pin. The BIOS and Windows constantly monitor that measured temperature. If it exceeds a first-level limit, the system will warn you and start running everything at a much slower rate so that heat generation is reduced. If it exceeds a higher limit, the system will shut down everything to stop all operation. In addition, almost all mobos do another check. They watch the speed signal being fed to the CPU_FAN header (presumably, from the fan on the CPU chip). If it stops (no speed signal) (OR, in some cases, if it falls slower than a low limit you can set), it calls that a fan failure. Since NO cooling can cause a big problem, it may warn you clearly and, without actually waiting for the CPU temperature sensor to show a rise, simply shut down the system. Some mobos that do this also will NOT allow you to start the system if it gets NO CPU_FAN speed signal as soon as it starts up.
 
Jul 7, 2020
19
0
10
0
Both CPU coolers you ask about are of the heat-pipe design. That is, it is not a simple solid metal block with fins sticking up for heat removal. Instead the heat flows through sealed pipes containing a fluid that evaporates at the hot end (on top of the CPU chip case) and then re-condenses at the cool end where the heatsink fins are fastened to those pipes. In such a system, it is hypothetically possible for the sealed pipes to fail and leak, but that is very rare as Phaaze88 has said. I see that Noctua says the heatsink fans of their unit are soldered to the pipes for permanent contact, and claim that other makers may not do this, implying that simple mechanical crimping may fail over time.

By far, the MOST likely way for such a system to fail is that the FAN motor fails, usually because its bearings wear out. Initially this can cause the fan to run too slow and make a lot of noise; eventually the fan simply stalls and never turns. This also does not happen for many years, but will eventually. Often that can be corrected simply by replacing the fan alone, and not the rest of the cooler system.

There are TWO independent systems that watch for problems with CPU cooling because that chip is so important and so expensive to replace if it is damaged by overheating. Every CPU has a temperature sensor built into the chip by the maker that feeds its reading out on one chip pin. The BIOS and Windows constantly monitor that measured temperature. If it exceeds a first-level limit, the system will warn you and start running everything at a much slower rate so that heat generation is reduced. If it exceeds a higher limit, the system will shut down everything to stop all operation. In addition, almost all mobos do another check. They watch the speed signal being fed to the CPU_FAN header (presumably, from the fan on the CPU chip). If it stops (no speed signal) (OR, in some cases, if it falls slower than a low limit you can set), it calls that a fan failure. Since NO cooling can cause a big problem, it may warn you clearly and, without actually waiting for the CPU temperature sensor to show a rise, simply shut down the system. Some mobos that do this also will NOT allow you to start the system if it gets NO CPU_FAN speed signal as soon as it starts up.
Perfect ans what I was looking for. Thank you so much I appreciate. So it must gives bad affect to cpu and another components of pc. At this moment when CPU is overheated and shutdown itself. does any components fail?
 

Paperdoc

Glorious
Ambassador
No. The important reason for both of those systems to detect potential overheating of the CPU is to PREVENT permanent damage. So they interrupt what you are doing and either slow your system or shut it down completely BEFORE the CPU gets hot enough to damage anything. If that happens, then you must identify why the overheating started, and fix that cause before you can use your machine again. Otherwise the same problem will happen, and it will shut down again.
 
Jul 7, 2020
19
0
10
0
Perfect ans what I was looking for. Thank you so much I appreciate. So it must gives bad affect to cpu and another components of pc. At this moment does components fail.
No. The important reason for both of those systems to detect potential overheating of the CPU is to PREVENT permanent damage. So they interrupt what you are doing and either slow your system or shut it down completely BEFORE the CPU gets hot enough to damage anything. If that happens, then you must identify why the overheating started, and fix that cause before you can use your machine again. Otherwise the same problem will happen, and it will shut down again.
ok. I appreciate. Thank you for sharing your valuable knowledge sir.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS