Question Can I change the speed of an ethernet cable?

ProChecker

Commendable
Jan 18, 2017
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I bought a 1gbps ethernet cable and I’m afraid that if I connect it to my ps4 it will consume all my internet speed. Because my internet is also 1gbps. I have a Nighthawk M1 router.
Iwanted to ask if there is a way I can change the ethernet speed on the router or ps4?
 
Not really. You might be able to force it say 10mbps but the router would need that option.
You are better off using QoS if your router has it and put a limit on how much bandwidth the IP address of the ps4 can use.

If we use 1gbit as a example, but it works the same at 100m or 10m. Ethernet only runs at 2 speeds. Full speed or zero. So if it runs for 1 second at gigabit and then 9 seconds at zero you get a average speed of 100mbps over 10 seconds. The speeds you see in your pc are average speeds. If it didn't you would see it running 1gbit or zero depending on the small period of time it was looked at.

What happens when you have say a router with a internet connection say 50mbps what happens is the pc sends data to the router at 1gbit and the router puts it in a memory buffer and sends it out at 50mbps, So it may look like you are running 50mbps but that again is the average rate the data is really being sent between the router and pc at 1gbit
 
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I can think of 3 options. First, set the port on the router or switch to 100 mbps instead of auto negotiate. Second, you can buy those ethernet splitters that split the 1x4 pair native wiring into 2x2 wiring. You'd need one splitter on each end. The PS4 and router/switch will auto negotiate based on only have 2 pairs available which is a maximum of 100 mbps. Third, use QoS if your switch/router supports it. Personally I wouldn't worry about this. As was already mentioned your PS4 isn't going to be using 1 gbps anyway.
 

nigelivey

Distinguished
I can think of 3 options. First, set the port on the router or switch to 100 mbps instead of auto negotiate. Second, you can buy those ethernet splitters that split the 1x4 pair native wiring into 2x2 wiring. You'd need one splitter on each end. The PS4 and router/switch will auto negotiate based on only have 2 pairs available which is a maximum of 100 mbps. Third, use QoS if your switch/router supports it. Personally I wouldn't worry about this. As was already mentioned your PS4 isn't going to be using 1 gbps anyway.
Except you have to explicitly set both ends of a link to a speed, you can not have one on auto (only option on a PS4) and force the speed on the router/switch. It simply doesn't work like that!! QOS can only actively determine your priority on upload not download.
 

TJ Hooker

Glorious
Herald
Except you have to explicitly set both ends of a link to a speed, you can not have one on auto (only option on a PS4) and force the speed on the router/switch. It simply doesn't work like that!!
What do you think "auto" means, if it wouldn't automatically adjust to the speed the other end of the link is using?
 
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Doesn't work that way it is kinda random. When you have it set to auto the 2 ends send signalling to get it negotiated. When you set it to some value it disables this signalling so the other end that is still auto gets nothing back. Used to be it would drop to 100 half duplex on the auto end when that happens. Some chipset seem to be smarter I think they default to full duplex. Been a long time since I read the documents on hardware standards for ethenet ports but the last I saw said the results with only 1 end set to auto is undermined.
 
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Well admittedly I have not tested this with the PS4 specifically, but on my switch I keep auto negotiate turned on and then change auto advertisement from Max to 100-FD and it works fine for me without doing anything on the client. I guess it depends on whether the PS4 has full support for the auto negotiate signalling. I assumed it did.

Also, my router supports rate control. I can throttle both the download and upload independently. I set a max allowed bandwidth and the router clamps the bandwidth out the WAN port for any IPs matching the rule. Of course...that's not QoS per se, but it is an option if your router supports it.
 
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You don't have to set the speed at both ends. Just one is enough. What is required is that auto negotiate must be enabled on both ends.
 
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You don't have to set the speed at both ends. Just one is enough. What is required is that auto negotiate must be enabled on both ends.
You are making many assumptions here. It is very uncommon for most consumer gear to have any ability other than auto. The ability to set speed and duplex is common on commercial switches but most large providers like cisco and hp for example do not give you the ability to run auto at the same time as setting these values. I am not sure if it is even allowed by the standard. I have only seen this option on some of the lesser known brands so it is not a common thing.

But it all doesn't really matter since almost everyone on this forum is not likely to have equipment that has any abilities to set this.
 
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That is simply not the case, both ends must be set the same. This isn't an argument worth having if you do not understand this basic networking principle.
Surely you've plugged a device advertising 10/100 into a switch advertising 10/100/1000 and vice-versa and observed that they link at 100M. No?

I will say that leaving a 10/100/1000 device set on autoneg and the other fixed at 100-FD will typically result in a duplex conflict. But that's not what I'm suggesting to be done. Side note, I do believe autoneg and 100-HD typically results in successful link for well behaving clients. Correct? If so that would be yet option as well.

My cheap Linksys LGS308 supports the ability to keep auto negotiate turned and select the advertised speeds (presumably by setting the technology ability bits described in the 802.3 28/40 FLP frames) and effectively making it appear like a 10/100 or 100-only auto device. Unfortunately I don't think the more popular Netgear GS108E has this ability. But I think the GS108T does. If the OP does not have a switch with this capability or willing to purchase one that does then he'll have to consider other options or move on. Though personally I don't see what the big deal is. It's not like the PS4 is going to saturate a 1 gbps connection with any regularity.

BTW...please accept my sincere apology if anything I've posted comes across as argumentative. That's never my desire on this forum or the many others I participate in. My main motivation for posting at all is to learn. So I definitely encourage people to step forward and let me know if I've gotten something wrong. I'd rather take one on the chin and learn something than to continually misspeak. :)
 
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hang-the-9

Titan
Moderator
I bought a 1gbps ethernet cable and I’m afraid that if I connect it to my ps4 it will consume all my internet speed. Because my internet is also 1gbps. I have a Nighthawk M1 router.
Iwanted to ask if there is a way I can change the ethernet speed on the router or ps4?
If you tie a string to the cable and tighten it, it will make it harder for the data to get through and will lower your speed.


But realistically, your PS4 is not going to be using anywhere near your full bandwidth at any time, even when you are downloading new games to it, just plug it in and see how it runs.
 

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